Technology

Your Digital Rights, Gone?

This Story from Wired says content owners and digital rights management companies are discouraging the growth of digital music by taking liberties with their control of copyrights.


This One says First-sale rights do not exsist on software, since you only \"licensed\" it.


While This One from CNET says some bad things about the new \"Product Activation technology\" from Microsoft. The technology FORCES each user to register the software over the Internet or by phone.

And of course many people feel Mandatory Library Censorware is the worst of all.

The Wireless Library

Sharon Giles Writes:

\"From the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library (from their alert service LibLines)
With the opening of Sophie\'s Agora and Internet Café the HAM-TMC Library will have wireless capabilities. This means that our patrons with laptops and other portable computers may gain access to the internet without being constricted to the computer labs.


There will be 6 access points in the library\'s café, each capable of supporting 250 users anywhere in the library. However, to ensure that signals reach every level of the library, access points will be installed on each floor, allowing laptop users internet access from the stacks, study carrells and study rooms.

Whether you use a laptop or a handheld device all that is needed to access the wireless ports is a wireless PC card adapter.



Click here for more information on wireless technology.

\"

Chudnov on Open Source and Libraries

Online has an Interview with Dan Chudnov, from OSS4LIB.org, a cool site that highlights free software you can use in you library. It\'s a good interview for all you librarian geeks out there, way to go Dan!

I guess there are a few of us that can write code and site at the reference desk out there.

P2P Quickies

A trio of stories on Peer to Peer sharing [aka P2P, not to be confused with B2B, B2C or Y2K].


This one from Wired talks about how a new company, CareScience, is working to set up a P2P exchange for medical records.

Salon has One on PopularPower, and the emerging P2P business world. There are several companies hoping to make some money off of the latest internet buzz words.
If none of that made any sense, read This One, a nice look at what P2P is all about.

There may come a day when ILL is done like this.

Results of Web Proxy Use in Libraries

Peter Murray writes \"Last month a call for participation was posted to several mailing lists for a survey on
web proxy use in libraries. A report based on survey responses is now available at:
pandc.org/proxy/survey/report.html


Seventy-four responses came in from the survey. By far, the most popular use of
proxy servers in libraries is for remote resource access. The turn-key solution
EZproxy was by far the most popular, followed by Innovative\'s Web Access
Management product and the freely available Squid and Apache proxy servers.


Proxies for filtering and proxies for bandwidth conservation are equally popular
reasons in libraries. Microsoft Proxy server is a popular package for these
uses, but a wide variety of software packages are in use. Proxy servers are
also being used to gather statistics on resource use.

The report has numerous anecdotes and information from specific libraries,
including URLs to user documentation, description of systems, and software
packages.


Interested in adding your own library\'s experiences to the report? You can
still take the survey at the URL below; I\'ll periodically recompile the
responses and update the report:
pandc.org/proxy/survey/survey.html \"

The New Wireless Nation

Teri Ross Embrey writes \"It is becoming an increasingly wireless nation with recent reports predicting wireless growth to be significant for 14-25 years olds. So it is no suprise that for an article on wireless for IT Executives Information Week that the highlighted IT executive came from an Orland Park high school. Are libraries next? \"

NPR Connection show on Digital Libraries

Andy Breeding writes \"This morning\'s NPR talk show \"The Connection\" did an hour-long segment on Digital Libraries. Speakers include Anne Wolpert, Director of MIT Libraries and Brewster Kahle, President and Founder of the Internet Archive.

Information on the show is available at: theconnection.org

A RealAudio recording of the broadcast is available at:

The Web Site \"

SUNY\'s Library-Software Contract Includes Code

The Chronicle has a Story on a contract the State University of New York signed with Ex-Libris. The contract requires Ex-Libris to place in escrow a complete copy of the software source code and all related documentation. That means SUNY can look at the source code and documentation for the company\'s library-management system. Sounds like a good move.

Earth’s Largest Library in Sight?

Remember Steve Coffman\'s ELL story in Searcher? He proposed making an Amazonian library with all the Amazon benefits. Infotoday now Says OCLC\'s new strategy may just be on track to reach this goal. OCLC\'s new Four Corners strategy:

Metadata-Formerly called cataloging, but now expanded beyond the traditional OCLC records to new sources from a variety of partners and even some pre-publication metadata, all designed to serve the end-user and the librarian


Content Management-Will enable OCLC to help librarians manage their local collections, including archiving and digitizing local collections


Discovery/Navigation with the next generation of reference services, such as the Portal Management Service—Will help librarians create their own Web sites and portals, as well as effective interfaces for patrons dealing with the Extended World Catalog


Fulfillment-Rapid information-delivery services, including an integrated \"Click to Borrow or Buy\" feature.

I think most librarians would be happy if they just lowered their prices.

Open Access Wave of the Future

The Chronicle has an Interview with William Y. Arms , the guy who runs Dlib Magazine. He has some interesting things to say about the future of libraries. Mr. Arms says that once people are able to get all they need from the internet, they will stop going to the library, ease of access leads to use, and the library is harder to use.

\"I think it may be possible to have substantial research programs without access to conventional libraries\".

Some provocative stuff in this one.

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