Technology

New Pew Internet Report on the Mobile Revolution Coming to Libraries

Findings
Some 13% of those ages 16 and older have visited library websites or otherwise accessed library services by mobile device. This is the first reading in a national survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project on this subject. An earlier survey in 2009 by scholars at the University of Washington found that 6% of Americans ages 16 and older had used a mobile device to connect to a library site, so the incidence of this activity has doubled since then.1

Those who are most likely to have connected to a library site include parents of minor children, women, and those with at least some college education.

Invitation to participate in the annual Library Automation Perceptions survey

I’m collecting data for this year’s International Library Automation Perceptions survey.

http://www.librarytechnology.org/blog.pl?ThreadID=245&BlogID=1

This survey, now in its sixth annual iteration, provides an opportunity for libraries to register their perceptions of the strategic automation products they use, organizations that provide these products, and the quality of support delivered. The survey also probes at considerations for migrating to new systems and the level of interest in open source products.

While the numeric rating scales support the statistical results of the study, it’s the comments offered that provide the most insight into the current state of library automation satisfaction. Comments will be published in the survey results, redacted of text that might identify the individual or organization responding.

Please help your fellow libraries who might be in the process of evaluating library automation options by responding to the survey. Any information regarding vendor performance and product quality can be helpful when making strategic decisions regarding automation alternatives. A large number of responses strengthen the impact of the survey and the subsequent report.

If you have responded in previous years, please respond again this year to help identify any trends regarding improvement or worsening of the products or support services.

For more information about the survey, for instructions on how to participate, and to see results of previous year’s surveys, see:

E-Ink Case Turns the Back of Your Phone Into a Second Screen

Story at Wired.com

The e-ink screen that popSLATE uses is the next generation of screens that are at the core of e-readers like Amazon’s Kindle or the Kobo. Like all e-ink screens, it only consumes power when the display is changed. This allows for an always-on ambient visual interface.

What can you do with a second screen on the back of your phone? A lot, it turns out.

The power of having in-house technologists in YOUR library

Jason Griffey: "Really great write up of the internals of the tech team for the Obama campaign over at The Atlantic. Librarians and educators should read it as an argument for why it’s important to have technologists on your team directly, and not just rented out. "

DIY page-turning scanner made out of sheet metal and a vacuum

Google engineer builds $1,500 page-turning scanner out of sheet metal and a vacuum
For the past eight years, Google has been working on digitizing the world’s 130 million or so unique books. While the pace of new additions to the Google Books initiative has been slowing down, members of the team have come up with a new automated scanner design that could both make the project much more cost efficient and give everyone with $1,500 and a little know-how access to a page-turning scanner of their very own. In the video below, Google Books engineer Dany Qumsiyeh presents the prototype design that he and other teammates created during the "20 percent time" that Google (and now Apple, among others) allocates for personal projects, showing the design challenges he overcame along the way.

[Thanks Sassy Ass Sarah G.]

Paper Still Matters

"The other thrill for me, when I saw the document, was knowing that it has been digitized. Digitized! That actually meant that none of us needed to stand in line. We all could have gone to the web site instead. Yet there is something special about seeing the paper and the ink there in person. The lines of people in every city across New York State were a testament that in our digital world, paper still matters."

I Heart Wikis

“In other words, if you see something wrong, fix it yourself. Don’t just stand around saying somebody should do something. Be someone. Because on a wiki, there is no default value for somebody.”

"If you’re a wiki fanboi like me feel free to leave your suggestions for new wiki users in the comments."

The Security Implications of Teaching Librarians to Program

So if librarians are going to learn to program and we don’t want to put our public-facing servers at risk, what kinds of software development tasks could librarians use to cut their teeth? Here are some ideas...
[Fixed that link!]

iPads set to take over from books in school libraries, principal says

Seems Like A Bad Idea...

Principal of Madison Park Primary David Lawton said books would become a "thing of the past".

"The day has arrived - iPads are here ... look out books," Mr Lawton told the News Review Messenger.

"School library budgets are being lowered and our budgets for technology are higher, so it's only a matter of time before technology takes over from the traditional way of teaching.

Finally! A Use For That 80 Terabyte Thumb Drive You Didn't Know What To Do With

80 terabytes of archived web crawl data available for research
Internet Archive crawls and saves web pages and makes them available for viewing through the Wayback Machine because we believe in the importance of archiving digital artifacts for future generations to learn from. In the process, of course, we accumulate a lot of data.

We are interested in exploring how others might be able to interact with or learn from this content if we make it available in bulk. To that end, we would like to experiment with offering access to one of our crawls from 2011 with about 80 terabytes of WARC files containing captures of about 2.7 billion URIs. The files contain text content and any media that we were able to capture, including images, flash, videos, etc.

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