News

Spider-Man Faces Being Banned In Nebraska Public School

Follow-up blog entry at Comicbook.com to this story.

After watching the news story on Omaha’s KETV Channel 7 website, I did some research into the title of the book, since it’s never mentioned but the cover appears on air. The graphic novel is Spider-man Volume 2: Revelations. Written by J. Michael Straczynski, with luscious curves provided by John Romita, Jr., Revelations was published in 2002 in hardback. Both Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and the Marvel Comics website do not list the book as having been published within the last 6 years, so I don’t know why the book was reported as being new, other than the fact that it was apparently new to that library’s collection.

Now here’s where the school district might have dropped the ball in a big time way. On the copies I have been able to find, the book says in big white letters “Rated PG, Ages 12+.” This book would have been fine in middle or high school, just not in the hands of a 6-year old! Whoever reviewed this book didn’t do their job. Mrs. Svendsen has a right to complain.

Full blog entry here.

What's News Over @ LISWire.com The Librarian's News Wire

LISWire.com, The Librarian's News Wire, is the sister site to LISNews.org. Birdie (AKA Robin K. Blum) and I run LISWire where we allow member companies and organizations to send their full-text news releases and multimedia content to librarians, journalists, library professionals and the general public.
Our main feed can be found at http://www.liswire.com/rss.xml
We have many other feeds that are all listed at http://www.liswire.com/topics/

If you'd prefer an email a few times a week, subscribe to our email annoucements. This is a one way list that contains the latest releases from the site.

Here's a few of the latest releases:

Oregon State Library Joins BCR's Shelf2Life Program
--- http://liswire.com/node/367/

2009 LITA/Brett Butler Entrepreneurship Award winner announced
--- http://liswire.com/node/366/

Spring Series Library Open Solutions Webinars Announced
--- http://liswire.com/node/365/

Four on the Floor: Evergreen Indiana Continues to Grow
--- http://liswire.com/node/364/

Library Partnerships
--- http://liswire.com/node/363/

Queens Library Invites You to Welcome the Shanachies
--- http://liswire.com/node/362/

WIND ENGINEERING 1977-2008 now in one on-line package
--- http://liswire.com/node/361/

Library Card Leads Police to Alleged Thief

Sheboygan police say they were able to track down a theft suspect because he left behind his library card, which he apparently used to try to unlock a tavern door.

Full story here.

How To Save Newspapers

David Carr of the NYT imagines a secret meeting of top newspaper people complete with cigars and cognac. On the Agenda:

  • No more free content
  • No more free aggregators
  • No more commoditized ads.
  • Throw out the newspaper Preservation Act.

    United, newspapers may stand.

  • Things To Consider Together

    Dave Winer, the gentleman who helped birth RSS, posted at his blog thoughts about a post-newspaper world. Jamie LaRue, director of Douglas County Libraries in Colorado, posts his thoughts about a replacement role libraries can play for news. The thoughts from LaRue are notable to consider in light of what the Nebraska Auditor of Public Accounts said in LISTen #62.

    Bucking trends, laid off journos start off news outlet

    Writing for the PBS Media Shift site, Megan Taylor looks at four Arizona journalists who chose to not go the much-maligned PR "escape route" and started their own news outlets. The site known as The Arizona Guardian is one example of such a paradigm shift.

    Final Edition: Rocky Mountain News to Shut Down Today

    Colorado's oldest newspaper, the Rocky Mountain News, is shutting down today, and industry analysts say it won't be the last to be pulled under by a rising tide of financial woes.

    E.W. Scripps announced yesterday that it is closing the 150-year-old Rocky, which has won four Pulitzer Prizes in the last decade, leaving Denver, like most American cities, a one-newspaper town.

    These are dark days for the struggling news business. Hearst threatened this week to close the San Francisco Chronicle unless major budget cuts are imposed or a buyer is found, and is also prepared to close the Seattle Post-Intelligencer if it cannot be sold. The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News filed for bankruptcy protection this week, joining Chicago's Tribune Co. and the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in Chapter 11 status.

    Full story in the Washington Post

    Some bright spots in Nebraska

    Students rally after hearing library branches may close

    Nine-year-old Grace Doll and her friends often visit Lincoln’s South Branch Library.

    So when the Sheridan Elementary fourth-grader heard the Library Board was proposing the closing of the South and Bethany branches to save money, she recruited classmates to rally after school Monday to support the 27th and South streets library.

    “I’ve been coming here since I was 2, and when I heard about its possible closing I wanted to do something about it,” she said Monday, taking a break from the protest. “It wasn’t hard to get my friends involved. They love reading and they just love to come here.”

    Full story here.

    Nebraska Librarians In Hot Water Over 'Rock Band'

    Librarians in Nebraska are under investigation by local news media and the state after a youtube video surfaced of these book-lovers setting up and playing Rock Band and Dance Dance Revolution.

    Further down in article: Most librarians I've known are surprisingly cool. They are dedicated people who like education, books and kids. I'd speculate that the librarians in Nebraska are buying game systems to draw kids to the library by actually making the place relevant to the interests and lifestyles of the people in the community. Shocking, right? After purchasing the games and systems, the librarians set them up and tried them out. Amazing, right?

    Story at G4

    Philip Jose Farmer Passes Into His Riverworld

    Legendary science fiction author Philip Jose Farmer died yesterday morning at his home in North Peoria. He was 91.

    Farmer was well known as the man who wrote the Riverworld series of books which are considered classics of science fiction and explore the world of life after death.

    Normally a sort of reclusive figure, Philip Jose Farmer was passionate about his local libraries. Indeed, he gave them the credit for fostering his love and of reading and writing.

    More news from the PJ Star.

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