News

Worthless Study Proves Nothing

I post this one, more to comment on the story, not to report any findings.
This Story was picked up and reported on by about everyone.
A preliminary study of 150 people aged 20 to 35 has shown that more than one in 10 are suffering from severe problems with their memory.
Tiny study, actually, not even a study, a preliminary study, shows some people are stupid, and all of a sudden this is the headline I read... \"Computer-mad generation has a memory crash\" There are so many things wrong with this story I will not waste my time with it.

Please read the entire story critically, and make up your own mind.

Library Automation - Schools

Someone writes \"This is kind of interesting. Sirsi and Sagebrush Corporation have partnered to give Sagebrush a multiuser system to sell to the school market. Sagebrush has been buying marketshare for two years now and this allows them a slice of the pie that normally goes to the larger multiuser systems like Sirsi. None of the major vendors have shown any real talent in targeting this market. Whatt does this mean for Follet and Sirs? My guess is it doesn\'t hurt the bread and butter part of the business for Follet, the single school. To be truthful they could never win thoughs to begin with. However it does make Sagebrush more interesting to the multi-site school installations which are gravey to the larger vendors. So Sirsi now has someone dedicated to this market so that the other large vendors will have to fight for the large sites with the handicap of not really knowing the market.

The Press Release \"

Ladies and Gentlemen, the new Oprah Book is...

The best way to market a new book is to say that it will be the next \"Oprah\" book. Just make sure that the Oprah people know about it first.\"On Wednesday, WMA agent Mel Berger submitted Sandbox Wisdom: Revolutionize Your Brand with the Genius of Childhood, by Tom Asacker, to Warner. Accompanying the hardcover, which was originally published last March by Eastside Publishing, was a letter on Harpo letterhead, indicating that it was to be the next Oprah book club pick. There was just one problem: Harpo, the company that produces The Oprah Winfrey Show, says it has nothing to do with him. \'\'Tom Asacker has no affiliation with Oprah Winfrey, the Oprah Winfrey show or Harpo Productions, and we are looking into this matter further,\'\' a Harpo spokesman told Inside.\" -- Read More

Online Schools

Former Education Secretary William Bennett is one of the folks out selling some new online schools. Bennett once gave schools\' efforts to increase use of computers in teaching an \"F-\". Cnet has the Full Story.


Washington Post has another story on the same thing. Sounds like a big gamble on some vaporware.

\"It\'s a back-to-basics approach,\" Bennett said. \"We\'re combining traditional learning and powerful technology.\"

New Tech Standards for School Administrators

The NY Times has a Story on how Representatives from the ISTE, the National School Boards Association, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and others are trying to put together some sort of standards for clueless school admins.

\"Administrators need to be comfortable about not knowing everything, but they should know who knows,\" she said. \"They don\'t have to be a network administrator.\"

All About AskUsQuestions.com

Brad Stephens sent along this look at AskUsQuestions.com . Check it out, this is a really neat idea, and they will be adding more libraries as they go along.

One of the most important trends for all libraries within the
next five years will be developing a "bricks and clicks"
service orientation. With this orientation, not only will
libraries continue offering existing "in-house"
services, but new services will also be developed and existing
services altered so that they can be offered to patrons outside
of the physical building via the web.

Many libraries have already begun developing such resources with
the implementation of remote patron access to subscription
databases, web accessible catalog systems, and email-based
reference - but more can be done. And more is exactly what
AskUsQuestions.com seeks to provide. -- Read More

The Great Hunt

How are the the strategies you use when you surf the Web similiar to the ones hunter-gatherers used to find food? [more].

This is the intriguing question posed by New Scientist in this article by Rachel Chalmers, \'Surf Like A Bushman\'.

Dogpile Saves Lives

Search Engine Guide has this really strange article about a man who was having a heart attack, jumped on Dogpile did a boolean search, and saved his own life. Who said that Internet was bad for you.\"While doing homework for a class at Sinclair Community College, Mr. Russell found himself facing an adversary even more dangerous than Simon Bar Sinister; chest pains. As the pains quickly became severe and a terrible pressure grew in his chest, Mr. Russell became concerned. He decided to launch a search on Dogpile to help him track down a list of heart attack symptoms to see if they matched what he was feeling. Relying on Dogpile\'s ability to handle Boolean search commands, Mr. Russell typed \'symptoms and \"heart attack\"\' to help him pinpoint the life saving information he needed fast.\" -- Read More

I Saw You in the Paper

Here is an interesting little tidbit by Ananova about a public library in Tennessee publishing the names of patrons who have overdue materials in the local paper. Now, I have always wanted to see my name in the newspaper, but not this way. I hope they are not printing the names of the books that these delinquents have out\"The Lawrence County Public Library, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, published a notice containing more than 100 names of people who have failed to bring their books back.

And the strategy appears to be working, because some books which had been out of circulation for up to two years, have been returned.\" -- Read More

That Guy Who Hit Stephen King OD\'d on Painkillers

You will have scroll down a bit to find this story from the Mount Washington Valley about the man who mysteriously died after hitting the king of horror. It turnd out that he might have overdosed on painkillers. This freaky story takes another odd turn when we find out that the guy may have died on Stephen King\'s birthday.\"The motorist who gained notoriety when he struck Stephen King with his van died of an accidental overdose of a painkiller, according to the state medical examiner’s office.
Bryan Smith, 43, of Fryeburg, died from an overdose of fentanyl, according to toxicology reports. He was found dead in his home on Sept. 22, three days after he was last seen by family members.\". Further down on the page, read about a book that was taken off a required reading list, but not out of the library...and the appeals that will be forthcoming.

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