School Libraries

The Impact of Computers on Schools

Donna Sent along this Story from Tech Source on The Impact of Computers on Schools. It talks about Donald Tapscot\'s \"Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation\" and \"Failure to Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children’s Minds—for Better and Worse\" by Jane Healy. Two books that took 2 very different looks at the computer and it\'s affects on schools.

\"The thrill of using technology in the classroom is compelling. However, it must be tempered by concern for productive use and an awareness of the possible negative effects of computers on young learners. Keeping students’ physical well-being in mind, teachers must carefully arrange computers in the classroom (taking ergonomics into account) and set time limits for computer use. An informed, balanced approach to technology infusion is key, and Tapscott and Healy\'s books are a must-read for all willing to reengineer themselves for 21st-century education.\"

School Libraries Bustling

The American School Board Journal has a nice Story on the different ways school libraries are changing to better meet the needs of their students.

\"I used to spend so much time wandering from table to table, policing kids and telling them to hush or leave,\" says a middle-school librarian in Vermont. \"Now I sit down with the kids and talk with them about books they\'re reading or reports they\'re writing. It\'s made a world of difference — for them and for me.\"

NPR Audio on Philadelphia Schools

From member station WHYY, Martin Wells reports Philadelphia schools are making an effort to get rid of library books that are tattered, inappropriate, or just plain wrong. Some decades old books talk about how man may one day land on the moon, another wrongly says that South African leader Nelson Mandela was executed.


You can listen to the Real Audio report on The NPR Site.

Libraries Need Cash

I saw this sad story from Inside Denver about cutbacks in school libraries, and I thought sharing may help ease the pain. Here are only a few frightening facts:(1)Part-time aides replace librarians who also have been trained as teachers.

(2)Two of five public schools have either no trained librarian or one who works less than half-time, according to the state library.

(3)Since 1994, staffing relative to enrollment has dropped more than 10 percent.
As jobs disappear and librarians retire, the pipeline is drying up. By 2010, the state library predicts, there could be no new library media graduates in Colorado.\" -- Read More

ZapMe to schools: Pay for your free computers

MSNBC is reporting that ZapMe! has zapped public schools with an ultimatum: pay for your free computers or we\'re taking them back.

According to the article, the company is blaming Ralph Nader (a popular pastime these days) because the notion of advertising to a captive audience didn\'t sit well with some folks.

This is an important warning sign to public libraries, too: if your partnership with a corporation sours, you may find yourself worse off than before you started. -- Read More

How to Get Books in the Library With No Money

Greenville News has this story on the creative ideas that school librarians have to get books on the shelves.\"In addition to holding the usual book fairs and cranking out applications for grants, they\'ve cashed in aluminum cans, sold candy and school supplies, urged parents to shop at certain grocery stores and use certain credit cards and accepted hand-me-downs from college and university libraries updating their collections.\" -- Read More

Libraries evolve with info age

Newsobserver.com has a nice Story on the school library of the year 2000. Most of it won\'t be news to you (did you know the school personnel once known as librarians prefer to be called \"media specialists\" now?), but it is still a nice look at how things are going in some school libraries.

\"The more resources you have, the farther you can get beyond the school walls and the more relevant an education will be,\" Bradburn said. \"At the the low end we have schools that have very little technology, maybe just one computer with Internet access.\"

Gifted kids and librarians

Brian writes \"A short Interview with author Judy Galbraith about the relationship between gifted students and school librarians, from Foreword magazine:

\"

Question: It makes sense that school librarians would be a gifted student\'s natural ally. Have you found this to be the case?
Her Answer Follows... -- Read More

If it\'s for the children it must be good

Brian writes \"Often-clueless columnist Bob Greene of the Chicago Tribune is encouraging people to donate their used books to needy libraries in Chicago Public Schools. I have a feeling this will end badly, with the school system deluged with unusable crap.

Chicagotribune.com has the Story

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You want Fries with that Shake(speare)?

The New York Times has this neat article on a plan to combine all the software in schools into one database. The program is entitled Schools Interoperability Framework and involves more than 80 software companies (Mr. Gates and all).\"The new standards, which were developed by the software companies and educators, will allow schools to link together the separate programs that run various functions, including the library\'s checkout system, the school\'s front office, and the cafeteria and transportation systems.\" -- Read More

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