Cool Sites

The Internet Classics Archive

The Internet Classics Archive lets you select from a list of 441 works of classical literature by 59 different authors, including user-driven commentary and \"reader\'s choice\" Web sites. Mainly Greco-Roman works (some Chinese and Persian), all in English translation.

What Is Print?

MOMA.org has put together a neat site, What Is Print?.

It\'s a look at all the different kinds of print, woodcut, lithography, etching, and screenprint. They have nice examples and explanations for each area.
You must have flash, and I\'d recommend a newer browser as well.

Digitized Linus Pauling Research Notebooks Available

Images of Pauling\'s 1922-1994 notebooks from the Oregon State University Library:

As with many scientists, Linus Pauling utilized bound notebooks to keep track of the details of his research as it unfolded. A testament to the remarkable length and diversity of Dr. Pauling\'s career, the Pauling Papers holdings include forty-six research notebooks spanning the years of 1922 to 1994 and covering any number of the scientific fields in which Dr. Pauling involved himself. In this regard, the notebooks contain many of Pauling\'s laboratory calculations and experimental data, as well as scientific conclusions, ideas for further research and numerous autobiographical musings.

The entire collection will be available by 2/28/02. The library has also assembled an exhibit to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Pauling\'s birth.

Collecting Bibliomysteries

Bibliomysteries was created by academic librarian Marsha McCurley, using her own collection of bibliomysteries as the starting point. Bibliomysteries are mysteries that haves settings, plots, or characters in them related to the world of books, writers, archives and libraries.

Science Fiction Citations for the Oxford English Dictionary

Researchers Mike Christie and Sue Surova are searching for citations of SF terms for the OED. You can contribute, too: if you have old SF stuff, be on the lookout for the word \'humanoid\' before 1940, or \'parallel universe\' before 1960, or \'UFO\' before 1953, or...

I\'m particularly curious to know if anyone other than Alfred Bester has ever used the term \'jaunt\' to describe self-teleportation. It doesn\'t have to be fiction -- just about any written source would do. Anyone have a citation?

Book Forager

Bob Cox pointed out Book Forager, they say \"Book Forager offers an easy way to find the kind of read you are looking for\".

It\'s a kind of wizard [not the D&D kind, but the install kind], that leeds you through choices, and finds a book based on what you entered.

You can choose things like, happy, sad, short, long, and so on.

Fun With Words

A few interesting English oriented sites.Shakespeare Search serves Shakespeare enthusiasts and students with a line-oriented search engine. fun-with-words.com is the website dedicated to amusing quirks, peculiarities, and oddities of the English language. 2002 List of Banished Words from Lake Superior State University, is the 27th annual List of Words Banished from the Queen\'s English for Mis-Use, Over-Use and General Uselessness.

Free Online GIS Tutorial

A free online tutorial for those of you interested in (or forced to wrangle with) geographic information systems:

Are you new to GIS and mapping? Would you like to learn what it is all about and learn how to create your own maps? Our online MapCruzinTM Map-Tutorial and Atlas is designed to give you a quick-start introduction to the basics of GIS and it won\'t cost you a dime . . .

Thanks to Fred Stoss.

E-cyclopedia\'s glossary of 2001

The Beeb has E-cyclopedia\'s glossary of 2001.

They say \"Many of the defining moments of 2001 spawned their own words and phrases. At year\'s end, we take stock of these additions to the news lexicon.\"

Dont be left behind, if you can\'t use \"Blinkin\", \"gastroporn\", \"impeachment nostalgia \" or \"weblog\" in a sentence , you are soooo 2000. They are also taking Submissions.
Link Stolen from Mefi.

LISNews Listed as Site of the Week at IASL

I just came across this today, and thought I\'d give all us authors, especially Blake, an electronic high five. There are other really cool sites of the week there too. Check \'em out.
From the web site of the IASL Site of the Week:
\"Each week or so, the International Association of School Librarianship (IASL) Webmaster selects a different Internet site to be her \'Site of the Week.\' This is meant to be an informal way of bringing intersting sites to the attention of users of School Libraries Online. The sites may be related in some way to school libraries or the work of teacher librarians, or they may be interesting examples of a particular kind of resource, or they may be topical or related to a current event. Or they may just be sites that have caught the eye of the Webmaster, for one reason or another. This is a personal, unofficial selection!\" To visit the site, Click Here.

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