Public Libraries

New York City Public Library

There is an interesting article by ADA LOUISE HUXTABLE, an architect in today's (Dec. 3, 2012) Wall Street Journal about changes to the New York City Library. "There is no more important landmark building in New York than the New York Public Library, known to New Yorkers simply as the 42nd Street Library, one of the world's greatest research institutions. Completed in 1911 by Carrère and Hastings in a lavish classical Beaux Arts style, it is an architectural masterpiece. Yet it is about to undertake its own destruction. The library is on a fast track to demolish the seven floors of stacks just below the magnificent, two-block-long Rose Reading Room for a $300 million restructuring referred to as the Central Library Plan."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323751104578151653883688578.html

The only place where creativity, business, art, education, youth, and experience come together

For the Non-Artist: A Case for Taxpayer Support of the Arts

Finally, the arts are not, and should never be, limited to artists and 'arts lovers.' Creativity exists in everything that people do. It takes huge amounts of imagination and critical thinking to run a business (I grew up in a family business), or to create and manage a manufacturing process, or design a new widget, or promote different living environments. Art and creative thought is sought and appreciated by people who must turn thinking into action, and action into profit. The creative thinker - Steve Jobs, for example, and a thousand others like him - is the one who succeeds where others don't, who expand when others stay static, and who drive change toward the new, and the untried, and the next best thing - or the next best place. And the key -- perhaps the only -- place where creativity, business, art, education, youth, and experience come together is the public library. It is my absolute conviction that the Central Library should be rapidly developed in this regard. Its funding is critical to the cross-sector interactions that will continue to drive Buffalo's reimagining.

Hard-hit Queens area is getting temporary library

A hard-hit area of Queens is getting a temporary library — set on blocks in the sand.

The permanent Queens Library at Arverne was badly damaged by superstorm Sandy.

On Friday, a double-wide trailer is being set up next to the library.

It's expected to open to the public by Monday.

Why Good Libraries are Important for Education

Neighborhoods with high poverty rates have lower test scores. Education is affected by lack of access to resources. Libraries and their staff (both in schools and out of schools) are part of those resources that can help bridge the achievement gap between rich and poor students. Working-class children hear 10 million words before they enter kindergarten compared to the 30 million that kids with professional parents hear. That initial vocabulary gap is predictive of reading comprehension in high school (Beth Fertig "Why Can't U Teach Me 2 Read?"). The gap is developed in part by lack of access to literary materials, which libraries provide free of charge, and probably continues because of the perpetual inaccessibility of libraries to the inner-city. I'm sure Schaumburg has great test scores that are in part due to its great main library and school libraries. Let's make it a city goal to have good libraries, and our students (and their test scores) will benefit from the plentiful access to educational resources.

Libraries on the radio

This morning Wisconsin Public Radio devoted an hour to discuss the role libraries play in our lives and communities. Guests: --Wayne Wiegand (WEE-ghend), library historian and author of books including Main Street Public Library: Community Places and Reading Spaces in the Rural Heartland. He's a former professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison --John Cole, Founding Director of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress

Raccoon Seeks Shelter in Queens Library During Sandy

From NBC News.

Librarians Without Borders hosts Prominent Guatemalan Educator and Social Activist

From November 11-29 Librarians Without Borders' hosts their Guatemalan partner, Jorge Chojolán, on a speaking tour in five North American cities: Toronto, London (Ontario), Ottawa, Montreal, and Los Angeles.

Jorge is the founder and director of the Asturias Academy, a progressive K-12 school that offers education for students from low-income and indigenous families. The speaking events will focus on education reform, leadership, libraries, literacy, and indigenous issues and culture in Guatemala.

Since 2009, Librarians Without Borders has worked with Jorge and the Asturias Academy to promote literacy and libraries in Guatemala. Through many hours of fundraising, planning and hard work, Asturias was able to open a community library to students and their families in January 2011.

For detailed information on the events, time, and places, read more here. All these events are free and open to the public.

Those Libraries that Are Able Come to the Aid of Sandy Victims

Some libraries in NYC were lucky. Remarkably, NYPL’s system, incorporating libraries in Manhattan, Staten Island, and the Bronx, suffered virtually no structural damage, says Angela Montefinise of the NYPL. Queens and Brooklyn have separate systems.

Some stories from:

  • Freeport Long Island
  • Lindenhurst LI
  • Morris Heights Queens library may not be available for voting on Tuesday
  • Far Rockaway Queens branch in shambles
  • Los Angeles' library cards could double as identification, debit cards

    A Los Angeles City Council committee unanimously approved the proposal from Councilman Richard Alarcon. The ID card would include a resident’s photograph, full name, address, date of birth and details on height, weight, and hair and eye color. The card would not be a driver’s license and could not be used as an ID to board a plane. The card could also be a pre-paid debit card that allows residents to build credit.

    Why the Brooklyn Public Library Changed My Life

    "I have been able to make a difference in the lives of others, and in my own life because of the opportunities and programs I found at my local Iibrary. It was definitely one of the most rewarding jobs I could have ever done. It has made me stronger, more skilled and equipped for the working world and more confident in who I am as a person. I can truly say I've discovered a lot about myself because of the summers I've spent in programs at the library. Brooklyn Public Library has forever changed my life."

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