Public Libraries

NYPL Changes Plans For Fifth Avenue Library

From the New York Times: Responding to objections raised by scholars, writers, artists and others, the New York Public Library has revised its plan to remove most of the books from its flagship Fifth Avenue research center to make room for a circulating library. Library officials said that an $8 million donation would help pay for enough new storage space to keep 3.3 million of its 4.5 volumes.

The change, approved by the library board on Wednesday, marks a significant shift in the Central Library Plan, a $300 million proposal to turn the historic building into the world’s largest combined research and circulating library.

“I’m very pleased both by the outcome but also by the process,” said Anthony T. Grafton, a Princeton University history professor who serves on the plan’s advisory panel. “It seems to me we saw a great public institution and its leader actually listening to the response of its public.”

The gift, from Abby S. Milstein, a lawyer and trustee, and her husband, Howard P. Milstein, a banker, will cover the cost of building 30,000 square feet of storage space to keep 1.5 million books that would otherwise have been sent to a warehouse in New Jersey. Scholars and others have protested plans to send the books away, arguing that research would be inhibited by the inevitable resulting delays in retrieving books, and that the changes would diminish the library’s role as a leading reference center.

“This is a great outcome,” Anthony W. Marx, the library’s president, said in an interview. “We’re investing in good old-fashioned books for research, but we’re also working to ensure digital access and provide more education programs in branches.” -- Read More

Bedbugs arrive in county library's mail

YUCK!... The St. Clair County Library got a little bit more than it bargained for with some returned materials this week.

Library Director Allison Arnold said bedbugs caught a ride into the Port Huron branch of the library Tuesday with a package of materials that had been borrowed through the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

One year later residents see fee system benefits

Although it was a public relations concern at the time, the $80 library-card fee imposed on users not residing in the Santa Clara County Library District in July 2011 has since proven mostly beneficial to Los Altos and Los Altos Hills users.

Nearly 14 months after the fee went into effect, statistics show increased patronage of the Los Altos main and Woodland Branch libraries by local residents and more materials available to them with decreased competition from nondistrict users.

Glasgow libraries to offer cancer support services

Cancer support and information services will be offered in libraries across Glasgow in what is thought to be the first project of its kind in the UK.

Macmillan Cancer Support and Glasgow Life are working together to ensure every cancer patient in the city can get help within their local community.

Should L.A. give Undocumented Immigrants I.D. (library) Cards?

Important story from the LA Times earlier this week: Los Angeles is considering a major step in providing ID cards to illegal immigrants. The Los Angeles Public Library card could one day become a form of identification for the city's large illegal immigrant population that would allow them to open bank accounts and access services.

Here's the follow-up in the Opinion Pages.

Chicago Library Patrons Return More Than 100,000 Items During Amnesty Period

Patrons gave more than [Fixed that link] 100,000 books and other items back to the Chicago Public Library during a three-week period where the library granted amnesty from fees.

Spokesman Leland Elder said in a news release that Chicago libraries received 101,301 items during the Once in a Blue Moon amnesty period, which started on Aug. 20 and ended Tuesday. The amnesty applied to overdue books, CDs, DVDs and all other materials.

OH County Library Hires Firm to Study Employees’ Compensation

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County has hired a Cleveland consulting firm to study the pay and benefits of library employees compared with those of their peers doing similar work elsewhere.

That firm, The Human Resource Department, will be paid between $12,000 and $13,500 for the compensation study, depending on its scope.

The services and personnel committee of the library’s board of trustees will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday at the Poland library to discuss the library system’s compensation philosophy and the compensation study.

Story from The Youngstown Vindicator (interesting newspaper name!)

Do homeless support agencies see an uptick in use when the library closes?

Good Question... The library in Seattle has been closing during for a week for the last 4 years. Seems like there might be some historical data that these shelters and services could show about any increase in visits.

A New PAC Just for Libraries

EveryLibrary is launching today as the first and only national political action committee (PAC) for libraries. Focused exclusively on local library ballot initiatives and measures, EveryLibrary is dedicated to helping libraries win at election time. The organization, found online at www.everylibrary.org, will fundraise nationally to support local library ballot committees and PACs, and provide them with technical support and consultancy on how to run – and win – at the ballot box.

“EveryLibrary is built on the idea that any library ballot initiative anywhere matters to every library everywhere,” says John Chrastka, executive director of EveryLibrary. “EveryLibrary will allow us to raise funds and support specific ballot measures that keep libraries open and thriving. Elections are the “last mile” of library advocacy and this new PAC is an amazing opportunity for our community to talk directly to voters.”

EveryLibrary is conducting a $50,000 fundraising round from September 5 to November 7, 2012 to underwrite the fees associated with its legal filings and to create campaign toolkits, voter education materials, and messaging targeted to 2013 election initiatives. Visit http://rally.org/everylibrary to learn more and to donate today. Individuals, corporations, unions, and certain foundations are eligible to donate. EveryLibrary will use donations to support local committees and PACs while providing technical assistance to campaigns.

Cincinnati girl abducted from PL

2 year old child abducted from the Cincinnati Public Library
Cincinnati Police are investigating the abduction of Taishaionna Page. She is a 2-year old black child. She was taken today from the Main branch of the Cincinnati Public Library at 800 Main Street in downtown Cincinnati.

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