Archives

\'King of Porn\' Empties Out His Castle

Luis Acosta writes \"The Washington Post has this amusing and informative feature about a Library of Congress curator\'s private archive of erotic literature being donated to the Museum of Sex, a new museum soon to open in New York. Between the jokes about the collector\'s eccentric enthusiasm, the article recognizes how his contribution will help further the new museum\'s worthy mission, \"to bring the best of contemporary scholarship on sex and sexuality to a larger audience.\" \"

Special Collections in Prague Damaged by Flood

Paul Coleman writes \"This article in the New York Times reports damage to libraries, museum collections, and historic site archives wrought by the floods in central Europe. \"[O]ne of the librarians,\" the reporter writes, \"was near tears as she recounted how hundreds of rare books were soaked despite being moved for safekeeping.\" \"

Battle over Yale\'s Vinland map

Charles Davis writes \"Two new studies add fresh fuel to a
decades-old debate about whether a
parchment map of the Vikings\' travels
to the New World, purportedly drawn
by a 15th century scribe, is authentic
or a clever 20th century forgery.
see
The Full Story, from CNN.\"

The man who owns TV nostalgia

jen writes \"My favorite quote:
\"If you handle enough Eva Gabor negligees from \'Green Acres,\' after a while you know what kind of stitch the studio used.\"
Full Story \"

For The Fourth

Lee Hadden writes: \"There is an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal, July 3,
2002, pages B1 and B3, on the preservation efforts of the National Archives
to protect and display the major documents of American history.\"

He also points out the Wachenheim Gallery at the New York Public Library has one of only five or six copies
of Jefferson\'s original draft
he had mailed to
friends, to show where
the congressional
editors had struck. It\'s on display
through July 13.

Bob Cox points out This Story that says the Dallas Central Library has one of the few remaining
original printings of the Declaration of Independence, hermetically sealed in a glass box controlled for
temperature, humidity and light. The copy now on permanent display in Dallas was discovered in 1968 in the basement of a used-book
store in Philadelphia that had closed after 132 years.

Russia pays off debts with archive donations

Charles Davis writes \"Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s,
Russia has owed Finland a considerable amount that was
previously negotiated in the form of bilateral trade exchanges.
There have been numerous and varied efforts to find ways of
paying off the debts, currently standing at around EUR 538
million, and one recent example has greatly benefited the
Helsinki University Library, Finland\'s national copyright reference
library.
Last Monday an agreement was signed between the
establishment and the Russian Federation, under which the
University Library will receive around four million pages of
archived microfilm and microfiche material.
Read the
Full Story Here. \"

Historic documents put away for restoration

Charles Davis writes \"It is a source of Baltimore pride, an icon of American history
and perhaps the most vivid symbol of Independence Day aside
from the flag itself.

But for now, the oldest manuscript of Francis Scott Key\'s
\"Star-Spangled Banner,\" the celebrated poem that became the
words of America\'s national anthem, is off-limits.

And so are many
of the other
prominent
symbols of
history that
patriotic Americans might be hoping to visit to celebrate the
birth of their nation.
Full story at
Sunspot.net \"

\'Superarchives\' Could Hold All Scholarly Output

Chronicle.com has a Story that says several colleges are now looking to share more of that work by
building \"institutional repositories\" online and inviting their
professors to upload copies of their research papers, data sets, and
other work. The idea is to gather as much of the intellectual output
of an institution as possible in an easy-to-search online collection.
One college has called its proposed repository a \"super digital
archive.\"

I\'m involved in one of these projects myself, it\'s going to be fun to get off the ground.

Archive of the Dot Com Era

Batman writes \"The University of Maryland is starting an archive of business documents from the Dot Com era.

Full Story \"

Neat! An assistant professor of entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland\'s Robert H. Smith School of Business, this week launches an online archive of business plans, PowerPoint presentations, internal e-mails and other artifacts of the Gilded Age.

Great Oldies From All Over

Charles Davis passed along This ananova Story on a cookbook thought to be the earliest printed in English that has
been unearthed at the Marquis of Bath\'s ancestral seat.

It dates from 1500 and includes recipes for the likes of
chopped sparrow and roasted swan.


MSNBC Has This One on an image of the French countryside, the world\'s oldest photo, captured by Joseph Nicephore Niepce on a thin pewter plate, has passed its first full-scale analysis with flying colors and is now awaiting an airtight case that will keep it safe for centuries to come.

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