Archives

Volunteers Nationwide Join to Create/Preserve Web Archives on Terrorist Attacks

A large number of volunteers nationwide are joining the Library of Congress and an Internet archive to collect and preserve online information from around the globe about the attack on America. more... from The Washington Post.

A Virtual Walk Through Tin Pan Alley

The Chronicle of Higher Ed is reporting on a cool new Online Archive at Mississippi State University\'s Templeton Sheet Music Collection.
The university\'s library is digitizing and conserving the collection, an archive of about 22,000 pieces of ragtime, blues, show-tune, and war-song folios from the 1890s to the Great Depression.

Bay County\'s Sage Branch Library seems to be taking the opposite approach, selling off volumes from the original collection of the library from 1884.

Book Worms Feasting on Historic Collections at British Library Cause for Concern

The problem of insects and parasites gorging themselves on rare manuscripts and historical texts is such a problem in the UK that the British Library has decided to organize a conference on the issue in order to find a solution. more... from The Times.

Archives of History of American Psychology Provide Insight Into Terrorist Mind

Anyone who\'s studied psychology is familar with the shock boxes of the mid 1900s. A volunteer, sitting on one side of the curtain, despite written warnings, would flip a switch emmitting a direct, high voltage jolt to someone on the other side, as indicated by agonizing screams. It was fake, but the person pushing the button didn\'t know that. From the Holocaust to modern day terrorism, the Archives of the History of American Psychology, in Akron, Ohio, according to director David Baker, \"is bigger and more important than any general psychology archive in the world. Imagine studying the history of art without museums and galleries, or of literature without libraries and bookstores. That\'s what it was like to study psychology before the archives opened in 1965.\" more... from The Plain Dealer.

Help build a Web Archive of the Sept 11 Attack

webArchivist.org is working with The Internet Archive in collaboration with the Library of Congress to identify and archive pages and sites related to the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington on September 11, 2001. They want to be sure that there is a solid historical record of this time.


They are asking for volunteers to help them identify any web sites or pages that have information or content about the Sep11 Attack. They are especially interested in finding sites by individuals -- that record their feelings, experiences or opinions. They are also especially interested in finding non-American sites.

Go to:
webArchivist.org for all the details.

Archiving the Past, but Embracing the Future

From the New York Times, a biography/informational article about Rodney Phillips, the director of the Humanities and Social Services Library at NYPL.

JOHN KIFNER writes: \"This is an amazing edifice, built to honor education and culture,\" Mr. Phillips said. \"I was so lucky to get that job out of library school.\"

Full Story

Bush Delays Release of Reagan Records Again

The Associated Press reports:

For the third time, the Bush administration has delayed release of 68,000 pages of Ronald Reagan\'s White House records, including vice presidential papers from President Bush\'s father. The papers were to have come out in January, 12 years after Reagan left office as provided under law. The White House delayed the release to June 21, then to the last day in August.

On Friday, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales sought a third extension, this time with no deadline, so the administration can review the records and consult representatives of former presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton . . . ``I think it\'s a scandal to hold them back,\'\' Anna Nelson, a historian at American University, said Friday. ``I think the whole point of the Presidential Records Act is to open documents. It goes against the spirit of the law.\'\'

More via the New York Times.

Archival entrepreneur gains leadership honor

Someone writes \"Wayne State University recognizes librarian/archivist by naming her recipient of Emerging Corporate Leadership Award. Article also discusses archival services conducted by her company, which are somewhat unique to the archival world.

Also, a rather non-traditional article for you to include. Most of your material cited relate to \"mainstream\" librarianship. This services as just another reminder of how versatile librarians/archivists can be.


Full Story from Detroit News \"

FDR Presidential Library

Anne Gometz writes \"This two part article in NARA\'s Prologue magazine recounts the history of the first Presidential Library including why it is called a \"library\" rather than an archives. \"


Until Roosevelt, Presidents leaving office routinely took their papers with them. George Washington set the precedent in 1797 when he took his files home with him to Mount Vernon, with the hope—never fulfilled—of building a library to house them.

Subduing the Paper Chase ?

Federal Computer Week reports on the National Archives\' antiquated and ineffectual National Personnel Records Center:

Requests for veterans’ records pour in to the National Personnel Records Center at a rate of 6,000 a day. But the records center, a massive warehouse in St. Louis, is ill-equipped to handle the demand. In an age when agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration can share electronic records almost instantly, the National Personnel Records Center still operates much as it did when it opened in 1955. . . On average, it takes workers at the records center 54 days to respond to written requests for records. But sometimes it takes years.

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