Money Issues

L.A. Public Library Cuts Prompt Demonstration Outside Main

Los Angeles Public Library supporters are gathered outside Central Library today to protest a two-day-a-week closure caused by budget cuts.

The demonstration started at 9:30 a.m. outside the Fifth Street entrance, 630 W. Fifth Street, said Mark Siegel, a city librarian.

Each of the city's 73 libraries will now be closed Sundays and Mondays because of a massive budget shortfall. Library services absorbed a 28% reduction in its workforce.

Siegel said at least seven librarians and 50 support staff have been laid off in the restructuring. He said Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the City Council had misplaced priorities in allowing the cuts.

"We just completed a massive rebuilding program, and people aren't able to use their libraries," he said. "We want them to move us up on the list."

Video from ABC news and story from the LA Times and the LA Daily News.

Priorities in Indianapolis: City Finds Millions for NBA Team but Cuts Library Budget

Dozens of readers stretched out with books on blankets and in lawn chairs on the American Legion Mall across the street from the main branch of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library, reading quietly to themselves to protest proposed budget cuts that could reduce hours and close library branches.

"I am here supporting the libraries of Indianapolis and hoping they don't get closed," said Mindy Grayson as she cracked open a weathered copy of the 1931 classic, The Impatient Virgin.

The city's library system is facing a $7 million budget deficit by 2014 as acknowledged by Mayor Greg Ballard Monday. "Over the past few months my administration has engaged the library system to prevent branch closings," Ballard said.

Ballard's comment came as he announced a $33.5 million deal to loan operating funds to the Indiana Pacers to keep the NBA team at Conseco Fieldhouse for the next three years.

Should Drugs and Sex Support Libraries?

That is the question that has been raised by a commenter in Will Manley's blog Will Unwound. The proposal is to legalize marijuana and prostitution and tax them heavily to help finance publically supported libraries. Reactions are invited

U.S. Public Libraries...We Lose Them at Our Peril

LA Times Op-Ed by library aficionado and author Marilyn Johnson:

The U.S. is beginning an interesting experiment in democracy: We're cutting public library funds, shrinking our public and school libraries, and in some places, shutting them altogether.

These actions have nothing to do with whether the libraries are any good or whether the staff provides useful service to the community. This country's largest circulating library, in Queens, N.Y., was named the best system in the U.S. last year by Library Journal. Its budget is due to shrink by a third. Los Angeles libraries are being slashed, and beginning this week, the doors will be locked two days a week and at least 100 jobs cut. And until it got a six-month reprieve June 23, Siskiyou County almost became California's only county without a public library. Such cuts and close calls are happening across the country. We won't miss a third of our librarians and branch libraries the way we'd miss a third of our firefighters and firehouses, the rationale goes … but I wonder. -- Read More

Pennsylvania's Libraries Faced with Another Round of Budget Cuts

As Gov. Rendell prepares to sign a $28 billion state budget that cuts aid to libraries by 9 percent, or $5.4 million, things are likely to get worse. To Pennsylvania's 624 public libraries - whose state funding was slashed 20 percent last year - the new budget reads like a book with the climactic ending ripped out. In recent years, libraries have coped with repeated rollbacks in funding by reducing hours and staff, charging small fees for borrowing movies and CDs, and scaling back on book-buying and special programs, such as the popular children's story time. Now, librarians say, they will have to pare even more while library use is higher than ever - thanks in large part to the economy. A spokesman for Rendell defended the latest cuts as the necessary cost of the recession. "The state can't print money," Gary Tuma said Friday. "We have to balance the budget with what we have." [Personal Note - they say they can't "print money" but Pennsylvania has the largest full-time legislative body that wastes incredible amounts of money solely for political reasons - e.g., both the republicans and democrats have their own separate printing departments - and that's just the tip of the iceberg].
Read more at: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/97751079.html

Pondering Budget Reprogramming

Lenora Oftedahl flagged on the PNLA list a story by Fox Chicago News. This television station is located in the same geographic area as ALA Headquarters. In light of the Illinois Budget Crisis, one writer at the station questioned whether libraries were justifiable expenses or if the money could be better spent shoring up policing, education, and public pension budgets instead.

Struggling Economy Makes For More Library Users

DUNEDIN – As the economy grew tougher, the community leaned harder on the Dunedin Public Library reports the Tampa Bay Weekly.

Anne Shepherd, library director, said libraries have quickly become sources of e-government – governmental services that now deal with business online whereas before there was an office people would visit to do business.

This first started with early voting, Shepherd said, which was the first time the library was particularly impacted by large amounts of people coming for nontraditional library services. Then the economy changed.

“In the past, what we saw was people coming in to read their e-mail, print boarding passes, kind of fun or recreational uses of the computers,” Shepherd said. “And now, starting about three years ago, we saw a big change, where people are coming in desperate. Sometimes in tears. ‘I have to apply, I don’t have a job, I want to apply, I don’t know how to use a computer.’ And at first we were kind of shocked, like how could these agencies have done this to these people, but then we decided we couldn’t do anything about that. Instead, what we’ll do is learn how to help these people.”

California's Broke, But San Diego's Getting a New Library

San Diego is getting a new expensive main library. The City Council took an historic vote last night to go ahead with construction of a new central library downtown.

Anyone who has lived in San Diego for a while knows that the dream of a new central library has been in and out of the news for years. The architect, Rob Quigely, designed its imposing dome shape in the 1990s. The site on Park Boulevard in the East Village was chosen a decade later, and now, finally, a contract will be signed to break ground. The First phase is estimated to cost about $150 million.

Mayor Jerry Sanders reminded the city council that $17 million has already gone into planning and well over $100 million has been scraped together so far to build it. Another $32 million is required to finish the job. Without that, the doors won’t be able to open in 2014, the state mandated deadline. The vote was not unanimous.

“We’ve invested nearly 20 years into planning for this new central library,” Sanders said. “As you make your decision, I want to remind you that not one cent of this project’s funding can be used for other city services. It can’t be used for branch libraries, can’t put additional police or firefighters on the streets, and it can’t be used to fix potholes.

Illinois Talking Book Program Will Remain Open

The Voice of Vision program, which provides talking books to visual or physical impaired residents in 12 counties, including dozens in Geneva and Batavia, has received funding to remain open for at least another year.

The DuPage Library System, which operated Voices of Vision in Geneva, and the Illinois State Library have signed an agreement to keep the center open thanks to a grant from the federal Library Services and Technology Act.

The center was slated to close after July this year because it had not received 97 percent of its 2010 grant from the state, which was worth about $450,000.

UK Authors fear cut in income from library loans

Authors fear cut in income from library loans
Minor romantic novelists might not be the first group to come to mind when you consider deprived victims of the current public spending cuts. But they and a host of the UK's lesser known authors are up in arms at the prospect of a drop in their already limited incomes through cuts in the money paid out on library loans.

Syndicate content