Money Issues

Fifth Third starts fund to save libraries

More Good News from Cincy, where Fifth Third Bank launched a \"Save the Libraries Fund\" to support five local library branches that may be closed because of budget cuts.

This after Commissioner Todd Portune, Cincinnati Mayor Charlie Luken and a handful of other elected officials Friday signed a declaration saying the library should not close five branches to help resolve a $4.3 million budget deficit.

State Libraries Face Bookkeeping Woes

Lack of space and funding is biting libraries in Utah. Libraries across the state may be forced to make a choice between having literary classics on their shelves, or Internet access. Read More.

British Library closed by strike action for first time

To follow up on Ryan\'s story, The Guardian Says the British Library was closed by strike action for first time.
The 24-hour closure was over the library\'s refusal to raise a 4% pay award to staff. These include the library assistants - some of them earning only £10,000 to £15,000 a year.The strike closed the new St Pancras building\'s total of six reading rooms and a similar room at the library\'s outstation in Boston Spa, West Yorkshire. Scholars at a third centre, the British Newspaper Library at Colindale, north London, were only able to work if they had ordered material in advance.

British Library faces strike

Managing Information reports:

The management of the British Library has been notified by the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union that it plans to take strike action over the Library\'s 2001-2002 pay offer.

A recent BL press release stated the British Library\'s management is \"disappointed that PCS has decided to strike. The pay offer averaging 4% has already been accepted by two of the three unions that represent staff at the Library. The offer is double the current rate of inflation and higher than the average for the cultural sector (3.8%). Furthermore, staff are aware that the Library does not have the funds to improve on the offer\".

Complete article, plus additional coverage from the Times.

Seattle libraries close doors to save money

Charles Davis writes \"The first of two weeklong library closures begins in a few weeks, as
the Seattle Public Library tries to reduce spending by $1.8 million to
help the city balance its budget next year.
All libraries in the city will shut down from Aug. 26 to Sept 1. That
means residents will not have access to catalogs, book drops,
computers, Web site, mobile services or even the automated
telephone line. Employees will not be paid.
More at
The Post Int. \"

Budget Cuts Force More Library Closures

The public library system of Cincinnati & Hamilton county in Ohio is shutting the doors on five of its forty-one branches on September 1. The library has lost over $4 million in state funding. Soma patrons intend to contact the governor\'s office. Read More.

Budget Cuts Force Seattle Public Library Closure

Book drops closed, no access to catalog, web site shut down, computers not available, no programs, no telephone service, etc. This is all for just one week in August and one in December, but yikes, what happens next time? Read the press release.

Ohio Governor Orders $375 Million in Budget Cuts

With Ohio\'s slumping economy, cuts to state funding for some agencies is necessary to fill a $1 billion gap. According to Governor Taft, \"In these tough times we have to tighten our belts, while giving priority to basic education support and programs affecting seniors and the health and safety of our citizens.\" Others criticize the move, saying that the cuts will jeopardize some citizens. The Columbus Dispatch has More Here.

Library\'s journals come with hefty prices

Gary Price, from the VAS&ND, sent over This One from Canada, on journal prices.

They repeat what we most likely already know, Libraries at research institutions,
including the University of
Guelph, have been struggling
with higher material prices for
two decades, and one of the
most prominent problems is the
skyrocketing price of prestigious,
high-end journals professors
want. The price of journals increased 226 per cent between 1986 and 2000, while
the cost of monographs (books) increased 66 per cent.

\"Libraries are being starved for funds. What is most seriously happening is the
price of materials is going up, and libraries are less able to purchase them. It
is most acute with journals,\" said Chris Dennis, chair of the Canadian
Association of University Teachers librarians committee.

\"What\'s causing the problem is the increased commercialization of the
industry. Academics need to know articles have been scrutinized by their
colleagues,\" Dennis said. \"

Minnesota cuts Library Development Services

Gregg Martinson writes \"Minnesota has closed it\'s professional resource library, severely reduced the capacity of the services in the state library for the blind and reduced it\'s professional support system for school libraries across the state. The uproar in the library community has been severe, and the commissioner for the state has responded in a curt fashion. Don\'t expect a response from Jessie \"the Mind\" Ventura. Its a sad time for librarians, especially school librarians in Minnesota. \"

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