Literacy

Spell wears off as children ditch books

The end of the Harry Potter saga has seen children ditching books in favour of their PCs, according to a new survey.

JK Rowling's series on the pint-sized wizard took the plaudits for the surge in children's improved literacy, but as his magic starts to wear off, children are becoming less enthusiastic about reading. Results show the next generation of young readers are not as enthralled in the books as children who were brought up on Harry Potter and as a result Scottish children have recently lost confidence in their reading ability.

Eurodollywood: Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Expands to United Kingdom

Entertainment superstar Dolly Parton was at London’s Savoy Hotel today and travels to the Magna Science and Adventure Park in Rotherham tomorrow to announce the launch of her Imagination Library program in the United Kingdom.

Where the Wild Things Came From

Slate.com: By the end of the 19th century, the art in kids' books had become madcap and zany and irreverent. From the postwar period, one can trace the imagery and style that are familiar from the classics of one's own childhood. Jump on over to Slate.com to see a slide show on the history of children's book illustration in the United States, based on Timothy G. Young's new book, Drawn To Enchant.

FreeRice - Boost Your Vocabulary and Feed Hungry People

The website FreeRice (http://www.freerice.com) has two purposes. First, they want to help people improve their English vocabulary. The site gives you a word and four possible synonyms. Get it right, and you advance to a higher level with tougher words.

At the same time, advertisers who appear at the bottom of the screen donate 10 grains of rice per correct word to the World Food Programme, which in turn sends it to countries in need around the world.

As of now, FreeRice has paid for just under 4 billion grains of rice, hovering at around 200 million grains per day. Not bad considering it launched on October 7 with 830 grains!

A Good Mystery: Why We Read

The New York Times asks the question why we read. PERHAPS the most fantastical story of the year was not “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” but “The Uncommon Reader,” a novella by Alan Bennett that imagines the queen of England suddenly becoming a voracious reader late in life.

At a time when books appear to be waging a Sisyphean battle against the forces of MySpace, YouTube and “American Idol,” the notion that someone could move so quickly from literary indifference to devouring passion seems, sadly, far-fetched.

Review readers comments or add your own.

Harry Potter the most re-read book in the UK

Nearly 80 percent of Britons have re-read a book, with the Harry Potter series the most likely to be picked up again, a survey revealed on Friday. Some of the books that are re-read for pleasure are classics such as Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre".

A Different Approach to Teaching Information Literacy

This article suggests a new approach to teaching information literacy: creating “a framework that focuses on higher education’s need to prepare students to be content creators within their disciplinary or professional specialties. Delineating the skills that students need in order to create content within the disciplinary context could be a more meaningful way of encouraging the integration of a wide variety of skills into the curriculum. Although information professionals may be able to neatly compartmentalize various literacies [e.g., media, technical, information], these divisions are beside the point for student content creators.”

Why Johnny, or in this case Mr. Johnny, Can't Read

Ever heard of Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome (also known as Irlen Syndrome)? It is not a vision problem, but a problem caused by the brain incorrectly processing what the eye is seeing. People with SSS are highly sensitive to particular wavelengths of light which causes them to see print in a distorted fashion. For some, words seem to swim across the page. For others, they swirl in a circular motion. Others have what is called the “rivers” effect, where the words on the printed page run together. Standard vision exams and educational assessments do not detect this condition.

Though he never learned to read as a child, Del Kennedy somehow managed to get through high school and into adulthood. Now in his late 50's, Kennedy has conquered this form of dyslexia partly with the help of the Muskogee (OK) Public Library’s Adult Literacy Services, and will speak about his voyage at a meeting at the library later this week. Report from the Muskogee Phoenix.

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet Gives Poor Families Books

As reported in The Economist, the President of Chile, a medical doctor and breath of fresh air after the cruel rule of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, has instituted a project to give a box of nine books to over 400,000 impoverished families. Her choices, among others, are Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye".

In today's The Lede (blog) from the New York Times...If You Had to Pick Nine Books...you are welcome to view other reader's opinions, and offer your own choices if you so desire. What would you choose?

Who says teens don't read?

A Disturbing New Trend! Despite the Internet, video games and technological pastimes, teens are still reading. In fact, from 1999 to 2005, teen book sales increased 23 percent, said Albert Greco, a Fordham University marketing professor and publishing expert.

The average Barnes & Noble Booksellers, he said, has 74 shelves dedicated to young adult literature. Religion, meanwhile, averages 110 shelves.

"It's growing and will continue to grow for the foreseeable future," he said.

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