Literacy

Woman helps fill new jail's library shelves

Amanda Allen is quite the super patron. She is the founder of Motor City Kids Book Drive, a nonprofit group that brings books to inner-city kids.

Allen, a Port Huron native, wants to expand the organization into St. Clair County. She decided to start by bringing books to the jail after hearing inmates didn't have many reading choices.
"It will help us because we have plenty of time on our hands while we're here," he said. "I'm not just sitting around, I'm trying to better myself. It would help if we got a couple of books to better ourselves."

Exam measures students' 'information literacy'

Darla writes "The Educational Testing Service (ETS) administers
a test
to determine a person's 'information
literacy'. 

Students "really do know how to use the
technology," said Dolores Gwaltney, library media specialist at
Thurston High School in Redford, Michigan, one of a handful of high
school trial sites for the test over the next few weeks. "But they
aren't always careful in evaluating. They go to a source and accept it."

"

Reading is for the Dogs

The Reader's Shop writes "post-gazette.com reports Whitehall Library in Pittsburgh, PA is participating in a program sponsored by a local dog obedience club. The program is aimed at children who need help with reading skills and is based on "the idea is that children will read to an unbiased listener who can't correct them or make fun of them." Participating as part of the "Reading Education Assistance Dogs" or READ program, Whitehall Library joins 750 programs in 45 states. More Here Or @ The National Geographic"

Pew Report on College Graduate Literacy Skills

According to a recent study conducted by the American Institutes for Research (funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts), "twenty percent of U.S. college students completing 4-year degrees - and 30 percent of students earning 2-year degrees - have only basic quantitative literacy skills." More on this study can be found in the press release, including links to the fact sheet and final report.

The grubby literati in America

Fang-Face writes "An interesting look at the state of literacy in the U.S. and a recent movement decrying the slipping standards thereof. Titled
Who Reads in America?, By Mark Schurmann, Pacific News Service, and posted to Alternet.org, this article intimates that literacy is becoming an underground counterculture."

Starbucks Canada Announces Second Annual Lattes for Literacy Day

From A PR Newswire: On Thursday, January 19th, 2006 Starbucks
cafes across the country will be hosting the second annual Lattes for Literacy
Day.
On Lattes for Literacy Day, 100% of all Starbucks latte proceeds will be
donated to ABC CANADA Literacy Foundation and Frontier College, two important
Canadian charities that are working to ensure that all Canadians have the
literacy skills they need to succeed. The charities will use the funds to help
support youth literacy programs in Canada. The programs address statistics
that show that many Canadians lack the skills needed to meet everyday reading
requirements.

Wheeled Library Sets on Bulgaria-wide Tour

Not Many Details Here, but The Sofia News Agency reports from Bulgaria where Classic and modern books will be delivered even to the remotest parts of Bulgaria through the mobile library to set off by June.

The idea, which will be implemented for the first time in the country after the example of other states, was presented by Deputy Culture Minister Nadezhda Zaharieva.

Every seventh Bulgarian or 13% of the country's population is illiterate, according to latest surveys. The worrisome percentages of illiteracy among Bulgarians is pertaining mainly to the ethnic minority groups, such as Roma population where 60% of the youth lacks basic education.

Dr. Andew Weil promotes National Book Week

Redcardlibrarian writes "Dr. Weil, on his website (www.drweil.com) promotes the activity of reading has a healthy activity:

"Books are more than just educational. They serve as outlets for our fantasies, can be inspirational, motivational, or just relaxing - pretty much anything you want them to be! This is National Book Week - a time when we encourage you to turn off the TV and pick up a book. Visit your local library (if you do not have a borrower's card, call ahead and see what you need to bring), go to a bookstore (new or used), or ask a friend for a recommendation. You can even join a book club - a wonderful way to connect with others and learn from their perspectives. Many coffee shops and bookstores have postings for book clubs that delve into almost any topic.""

Gorman Reacts To Declining Literacy Rates

stevenj writes "Several metropolitan papers offer an article today about the national data released on Dec. 16, 2005 that reported a serious decline in college students' literacy skills. Those who like to follow what ALA President Michael Gorman says to the press may want to see what he had to say, as one of the "experts" who was asked to react to the decline in literacy rates. One of his quotes: "It's appalling; it's really astounding. Only 31 percent of college graduates can read a complex book and extrapolate from it. That's not saying much for the remainder.". This one from the Pittsburgh Gazette was slightly longer than others. Read it at: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05360/628033.stm"

Libraries often 1st step to success

The Republican - Springfield,MA says when it comes to learning English, the public library is essential. Libraries are one of the first places new immigrants visit in their search for information and a way to learn about the language and culture, says Jonas Barrientos, 54, a local English teacher for foreigners.

Barrientos has taught English for Speakers of Other Languages at the West Springfield Public Library for the past 13 years, and teaches English at the Westfield Athenaeum as well.

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