Libraries

Hoopla wants to be a free Netflix for library users

Hoopla wants to be a free Netflix for library users:
Hoopla, a new streaming service for libraries, lets patrons borrow digital movies, TV shows, audiobooks and music. The selection isn’t comparable to Netflix, but it is free if you have a card at participating library. Hoopla is based in Holland, Ohio, and is owned by library distributor Midwest Tape.
https://www.hoopladigital.com/

Wasdin: Investment in Omaha's libraries pays off for citizens

Article at Omaha.com written by Gary Wasdin (executive director of the Omaha Public Library)

I think librarians in other cities will find this article interesting. How does your per capita cost compare?

SUV Crashes into Library in New Jersey

Why is it always the library? Fortunately it was closed and undergoing renovation at the time.

Video from ABC News about vehicle crashing into Hawthorne, NJ Library.

New Addition to the Little Free Libraries

"The Library Bench" (English, Chinese and Spanish) on New York's Lower East Side. Designed by Chat Travieso.

High School Library Trashed

With the majority of a high school library’s irreplaceable book collection documenting African-American history lost, the ire of the community grows.

Highland Park residents will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at the city’s Nandi’s Knowledge Café on Woodward Avenue to discuss the loss and what, if anything, can be done.

“Our history was stolen, it was trashed,” said Linda Wheeler, a former special education teacher for the Highland Park School District said of the tossed books. “It rivaled the collections of many community colleges. You can’t put a value on that. It is malicious destruction, it’s a crime.”

Earlier this month thousands of books from the library of Highland Park Renaissance Academy were thrown in the trash. Wheeler said the collection consisted of 10,000 books.

Wheeler’s father and longtime resident Earl Wheeler said a parent volunteer in the district told him the library’s books were thrown out.

“There were at least four (trash bins) and two were left before we discovered what was happening,” Wheeler said.

Wheeler called historian Paul Lee, who rallied a group of volunteers. The group went at night with flashlights, climbed into two bins and retrieved 1,000 books.

Wheeler said he was told the library was being rehabilitated by the Leona Group, a charter management company that operates schools in Highland Park.

From The Detroit News.

Weird Stuff You Can Check Out @ Your Library

From NPR (doesn't that make me sound like Carl Kasell): weird stuff that can be borrowed from different public libraries.

Items include fishing poles, snow shoes, garden seeds, pictures for your walls and bridal magazines. Anyone out there in LISNews-land lend other non-book items? If so, please comment below.

The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech

June 25th article in Time.

Usual mishmash of an article that manages to use shushing and stern librarians.

Has this great typo - “I think there’s some value to the ability to hold a book in one’s hand,” said Maureen Sullivan, president of the American Library Association. “There’s something very special about the tactical experience, a personal connection that happens there.”

I assume they were trying to use tactile. If the article now has the word tactile it is a correction because the word used above was directly out of the article.

Full piece.

Younger Americans Want Great Library Programs and Spaces More Than E-Books

If there's one thing older generations like to complain about today's young people, it's their devotion to electronic devices. What kind of world will we end up with if kids these days are all reading books on their smart phones? Which leads to the question of the future of libraries, the public's brick-and-mortar meccas for the printed word, which despite increased usage post-recession are still struggling to keep their doors open.

A Pew Research Center report released today offers some insight into the minds of the very same younger Americans who will grow up to define what our libraries will become.

Full piece

And Yet Another Urbana Story...

Source: State Journal Register
Dateline: Urbana IL — Some Urbana residents are upset and calling for the library director's resignation after thousands of books were mistakenly removed from the shelves.
(See two previous articles below)

Director Debra Lissak says the removal at the Urbana Free Library was a "misstep" and some of the titles are being returned.

The (Champaign) News-Gazette says workers removed art, gardening, computer science, medicine and cooking books from the stacks when they were culling the collection to remove volumes that were more than a decade old.

About half the library's 66,000 adult non-fiction books meet that threshold, but not every older book was removed because the process was halted.

Libraries Check Out E-Sales

Public libraries across the U.S. are getting into the online book-selling business, providing convenience for patrons but also raising concerns that the sales threaten to commercialize taxpayer-supported institutions founded to provide information free-of-charge.

The practice is poised for a boost, as three of the largest library systems in the U.S.—all serving New York City—prepare to start selling print books through their online catalogs by July.

At least 75 of the 8,951 public-library systems in the U.S. are offering online patrons the option to buy new print copies of titles in their catalogs, and an additional three dozen are preparing to do so, according to book distributors, library officials and library-software developers.

Those selling print books online include libraries in Orlando, Fla.; Jacksonville, Fla., Burley, Idaho; Mount Laurel, N.J.; and Douglas County, Colo. The Boston Public Library is among those considering adding the service.

Full article in the WSJ

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