Libraries

Libraries Behaving Like Bookstores? Amazing.

Article from 1979 to show that there is nothing new under the sun.

The First Bookless Library

The future library is the brainchild of Bexar County (TX, San Antonio area) Judge Nelson Wolff who got the idea while while reading Walter Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs.

“It's not a replacement for the (city) library system, it's an enhancement,” says Wolff who also happens to be a book collector. The library hopes to secure at least $250,000 to acquire the first 10,000 titles. There will also be 100 e-readers available for checkout.

“We wanted to find a low-cost, effective way to bring reading and learning to the county and also focus on the change in the world of technology...It will help people learn,” said Wolff.


artist's conception of how it might look

Michael Gorman Reminds Us His Enduring Values Mean Never Try Anything New

Some old-school types have mixed feelings about the push to diversify. "I hope the library doesn't turn into something that is a type of cooking-class meeting place with computers attached and no books," says Michael Gorman, former president of the American Library Association and university librarian emeritus at California State University, Fresno.

"If it appeals to youth and the youth are using the library... good luck to you," Mr. Gorman says, "though personally I would pay good money not to attend a standup comedy evening or a hog butchering."

[ See Also! ]

New Pew Internet Report on the Mobile Revolution Coming to Libraries

Findings
Some 13% of those ages 16 and older have visited library websites or otherwise accessed library services by mobile device. This is the first reading in a national survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project on this subject. An earlier survey in 2009 by scholars at the University of Washington found that 6% of Americans ages 16 and older had used a mobile device to connect to a library site, so the incidence of this activity has doubled since then.1

Those who are most likely to have connected to a library site include parents of minor children, women, and those with at least some college education.

Libraries And E-Lending: The 'Wild West' Of Digital Licensing?

Have you ever borrowed an e-book from a library? If the answer is no, you're a member of a large majority. A survey out Thursday from the Pew Internet Project finds that only 5 percent of "recent library users" have tried to borrow an e-book this year.

About three-quarters of public libraries offer e-books, according to the American Library Association, but finding the book you want to read can be a challenge — when it's available at all.

Full piece -- At the top of screen is a button to "click to listen" audio is 7 minutes 50 seconds.

This episode of "All Things Considered" had other pieces about ebooks and publishing in addition to the library one. They were:
Change Is The Only Constant In Today's Publishing Industry
E-Books Destroying Traditional Publishing? The Story's Not That Simple
Margaret Atwood's Brave New World Of Online Publishing

Libraries See Opening as Bookstores Close

From the New York Times:

As librarians across the nation struggle with the task of redefining their roles and responsibilities in a digital age, many public libraries are seeing an opportunity to fill the void created by the loss of traditional bookstores. Indeed, today’s libraries are increasingly adapting their collections and services based on the demands of library patrons, whom they now call customers. Today’s libraries are reinventing themselves as vibrant town squares, showcasing the latest best sellers, lending Kindles loaded with e-books, and offering grassroots technology training centers. Faced with the need to compete for shrinking municipal finances, libraries are determined to prove they can respond as quickly to the needs of the taxpayers as the police and fire department can.

“I think public libraries used to seem intimidating to many people, but today, they are becoming much more user-friendly, and are no longer these big, impersonal mausoleums,” said Jeannette Woodward, a former librarian and author of “Creating the Customer-Driven Library: Building on the Bookstore Model.”

The Harvard Labrary: A Design Experiment in Library Futures

Since November, the Harvard Labrary—a temporary ‘pop-up’ space in an empty storefront in the middle of Harvard Square—has been a public gallery for design student projects on the future of libraries. The projects come out of this fall’s semester-long Library Test Kitchen (LTK) seminar at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. With an open door every Monday through Saturday, the Labrary invites passersby to come in, interact with the projects, or just sit and work.

Full article

22 easy steps to check out an audio book from the library

Comic showing the 22 steps needed to check out an audio book at the library.

Librarian: No one is untouched by this tragedy

"People have been coming in tears. Yeah. I mean one of our programming people, who does programming for children here at the library, her son was shot," Library Director Janet Woycik said Saturday afternoon, as she stood on the second floor of the Cyrenius H. Booth Library on Main Street.

"It's just unbelievable... My neighbor's grand daughter was shot," Woycik said before falling into tears.

Full article

A Dark and Itchy Night

Sigh.

READING in bed, once considered a relatively safe pastime, is now seen by some as a riskier proposition according to this article in the New York Times.

Mark Lillis of Schendel Pest Services examines quarantined crates filled with library books in Wichita, Kansas.

That’s because bedbugs have discovered a new way to hitchhike in and out of beds: library books. It turns out that tiny bedbugs and their eggs can hide in the spines of hardcover books. The bugs crawl out at night to feed, find a new home in a headboard, and soon readers are enjoying not only plot twists but post-bite welts.

Syndicate content