Libraries

The ToyBrary

CNN has a short transcript on toy library in Los Angeles where kids can check out toys. An auction is being planned for later this year of a Shirley Temple Red Cross doll, it could bring in a million dollars.Can you just imagine how much fun it would be to be a ToyBrarian?

Cold War thinking at the Library of Congress

Mark C. Rosenzweig writes:Here\'s an Associated
Press Story
of residual Cold War thinking at the
Library of Congress.


My Response:


Open Letter to James Billington, Librarian of Congress

Dear Mr. Billington,

As the Chief Librarian and Archivist of the Reference
Center for Marxist Studies in New York City, an
independent educational institution with custodianship
of the library, documentation and records of the
Communist Party USA, it is of great interest to me how
the historical papers of the CPUSA, sent to the USSR
for safe-keeping during a turbulent period, have
become the property of the principals involved in the
recent announcement from your office \"Library of
Congress Opens to Researchers the Records of the
Communist Party, USA\".

Much More.... -- Read More

No more Prison Libraries in WA?

Holly Blosser writes \"Washington Gov. Gary Locke is proposing abolishing law libraries in correction facilities to save money. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has this article
about it. This would place all the burden on the Washington State Law Library, and they definitely don\'t have the resources to handle these requests. Doesn\'t make much sense to me, and I think there will be much opposition to this plan (or I hope so, at least).
\"

Will Libraries Survive?

The American Prospect has an Interesting Story on the past and future of libraries. Geoffrey Nunberg makes some very interesting points.

\"If we truly believe that universal access is both a public good and a private right, though, we have to realize that the public interest in obtaining information won\'t be satisfied simply by providing everyone with access to a computer and modem, no more than the public interest in reading books was satisfied once Carnegie had provided buildings to house them.\"

Why be a librarian?

Lee Hadden writes:\" The Winter 2001 issue of Occupational Outlook Quarterly (published as
a government document by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics) has a cover
story about the library profession. Entitled \"Librarians: Information
Experts for an Information Age,\" this 14 page article is available in PDF
format from their homepage at: bls.gov/opub/ooq/ooqhome.htm


This interesting article has information on library job growth
projections, future salaries in the profession (\"More jobs, more money\"),
and some idea of where the field is going. Not only does it ask (and
answer) the question, \"Why be a librarian?\", the article also suggests what
other things a graduate can do with a library degree. A good recruiting
tool.
     Cool. And free.

WA Considering Dropping Prison Libaries

Gov. Gary Locke wants to save money by eliminating
prison law libraries, which some say blocks
reasonable access to the courts, which some also say
will cause a flurry of lawsuits. Full Story from Seattle P-I.

\"It\'s wholesome activity,\" Alexander said. \"It\'s not
like we\'re setting up a motorcycle club for
prisoners.\"

American Libraries Disservice To Persons With Disability

Here\'s an Interesting Article by Joe Redman, no explanation by me needed.

\"American libraries, on the other hand, have a tradition of professed inclusion and equality. Mission statements and codes of ethics have fought against censorship and for intellectual freedom. Concerning persons with a disability however, libraries have shown an uncharacteristic conservative trend of exclusion, reflecting societies attitudes instead of setting an example for change. Libraries, from institutional to public, have often found themselves in the position of being the only contact many persons with a disability have with the outside world. Libraries have even had a tradition of subtle social activism. \"

Thieves plunder libraries for profit

Detroit News has a Sad Story on the growing trend of rare book theft from libraries. Demand for rare books and maps is skyrocketing, and the best place to find one is a library. Put it on eBay for a quick profit!Of course, rare books are not the only stuff stolen!

\"If you steal an atlas, and say there are 100 maps in there that you can sell for $50 each to a decorator, or a collector, it is very, very lucrative for thieves,\" said Detroit rare book dealer John K. King, who recently caught a seller trying to pass on an almanac lifted from the Detroit Public Library. \"Now people are stealing them, cutting them up and selling them on eBay.\"

Library of Congress Goes Digital

Wired is Reporting The Library of Congress has finally met its ambitious goal of putting 5 million historical items online by the year 2000. There are fears that the library will focus on archiving print media instead of dealing with the new digital information. The National Research Council\'s report A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress said that very thing.

The Book(s) Checked Out From The Library Today

Someone suggested \"At Salon Table Talk:
What You Checked Out of The Library Today\" over on Salon.

A topic for everyone, but especially for those of us who either cannot or will not buy books in abundance. Besides, libraries are about the coolest places on Earth, yes? So, tell us what book(s) you checked out today! CDs, videos, records, etc etc are OK too!


Me, I took one on a 350 year old Native American Village in my backyard.

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