Librarians

Nazi Era Book Left in Illinois Library Book Drop

From The Chicago Sun-Times: LaGrange Park Public Library officials are brimming with curiosity over who dropped off a rare book stamped “Secret!” from notorious Nazi Commander Hermann Goring, which is now under study at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

“It’s a great mystery,” library director Dixie Conkis said. “We had the book in our possession for a while not knowing quite what to do with it, but felt that because it was marked ‘secret’ it was probably a rather important book.”

The book, “1938-1941: Vier Jahre, Hermann Goring-Werke,” likely was left in the library’s book drop. It easily could have been discarded if not for Ursula Stanek, circulation services director, who grew up in Mannheim, Germany. The book sat on her desk for several weeks in the spring until she noted the inside cover was stamped “Geheim!” meaning “Secret!” with letterhead from Goring, the Nazi state secrete police commander.

Thanks to the librarians, the book now has a permanent home in Washington DC's Holocaust Museum, which had only previously had a reprinted copy.

Wife, colleagues helped make book MTSU librarian's final triumph

Thanks to some help from family and friends, Neil Scott was able to see his final book finished before passing away.

An MTSU librarian and author of several books, his latest book tells the story of the collision between the HMS Oranto and HMS Kashmir off the coast of Scotland near the end of World War I while ferrying hundreds of American soldiers from New York to various British ports.

When his father told him about two great-uncles who were in a ship that collided in World War I, Scott was hooked. He had to tell the story of the HMS Otranto and the HMS Kashmir. The Kashmir survived, but Otranto was left dead in the water.

Full article

Ember Stevens - How to Impress a Librarian - How to teach Boolean Operators

Here's a interesting talk about Boolean Operators by Librarin Ember Stevens at a non-library event.

http://youtu.be/1uWHkmq7zY0

Personally I found it pretty entertaining. In a day and age where some begin to doubt the need to teach boolean operators to undergraduates (see here), it is nice to see Boolean operators being explained in a entertaining way. 

Have you done it better or seen it done better? How do you teach Boolean Operators?

Library World Records is back online

The website for Library World Records, the Guinness Book of World Records for libraries and books is now back online.

Library World Records is fascinating book first published in 2004 after research work began on the book in 2002. The book was further extensively updated in a second edition in December 2009. Library World Records provides hundreds of intriguing and comprehensive facts about ancient and modern books, manuscripts and libraries around the world.

A much bigger brand new 3rd edition of the book is being researched at the moment and further details of this brand new edition will be revealed on this website around winter 2012.

Link:
http://www.lwrw.org.uk/Page1.htm

Godfrey
BSc, MSc.
London, Britain.

End of Summer Reading Challenges, and the Librarian Has Promised...

Here, at the Montgomery (AL) City-County Public Library Hampstead Branch, the librarian has agreed to kiss a pig if the kids read 1,000 books this summer.

We hear of dyeing hair green, jumping off a roof...what unusual deals have you or your colleagues made as promises to your summer reading program groups? Please add comments!

Check out the Library Card Table

From Brian Herzog, Swiss Army Librarian:

Earlier this summer, my coworker Tommy got the idea for a library art project: mail a letter to 200+ libraries across the country, asking them to send him one of their library cards.

He enclosed a return envelope, and most of them responded! For the next few weeks, Tommy's envelopes, with new library cards enclosed, poured into the library from all over the country. It was fun to see the variety and creativity of library cards.

Tommy's project was dependent on how many library cards he received. In the end, the number he got fit more or less perfectly on one of the coffee tables in the library, so he got permission to arrange them on a table and cover them with a protective epoxy. It looks great in the library, and the plan is to leave it in the library permanently. Tom also put up a sign on the table explaining what he did - the table is very eye-catching, and has already proved popular with staff and patrons.

Russell Shank dies at 86; former head librarian at UCLA

Russell Shank was an early proponent of automating library services and a fervent supporter of 1st amendment rights in libraries. He was a past president of the American Library Assn.

Full piece

Lost in the Stacks Hits the Big Time

Brooklyn librarian band "Lost in the Stacks", including LISNews author Rita Meade, had a lovely mention in the New York Daily News yesterday.

Fact Check - The $227,000 Librarian

A one minute twelve second intensive research project on the $227,00 librarian pension revealed some interesting things.

Of course, the claim is startling; the annual pension for a four-star general: $149,000. The pension for a San Diego city librarian: $227,000.

Full article

“Libraries need to admit that we suck at search and get over it”

"Libraries are metadata specialists and many librarians are metadata search specialists. Our training for users too often tries to turn them into mini-librarians too, as though being a specialist at finding things in the library is or should be a crowning achievement in life. So I really do think libraries are NOT experts at search. In fact, compared to Google I think we pretty much suck at it. I also think most librarians are specialists rather than experts at search. But what I don’t understand is why this seems to be such a challenge to librarians."

http://carolbycomputerlight.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/the-difference-between-an-expert-and-a-specialist/

This has shades of "Reference is dead" posts (here , here , here, here etc) and "Libraries need to give up the notion that question answering is a core service of the library" -- Read More

Syndicate content