Librarians

What libraries can do!

Bill Drew writes \"I have been trying to think how libraries might help their user communities in response to the attacks yesterday. I am helping by providing links to information resources I have found or that have been sent to me. I started with links from the Tourbus service sent to me by Jo Anne Ellis of SUNY ESF at Syracuse University. I am then adding others as I find them.
The URL is: morrisville.edu/library/timely.html

Other things we can do:
- listen to your patrons.
- provide a safe haven away from the news if it is needed.
- stay open to provide normality.
- be human and admit your own responses.
- share news and information sources with other libraries and librarians.

Any other suggestions are welcome.

Article contributors wanted

Librarian career development newsletter Info Career Trends is seeking article contributors. The immediate need is for the November issue on \"networking and mentoring,\" but queries are also welcome for future issues. For more information, see the web page
- click on \"Contributor Guidelines\" for more on contributing and a list of upcoming themes. Back issues and an online subscription form are also accessible from this page.
Rachel, the editor, mentioned that the theme of January\'s issue will be \"keeping current\" and she thought some of the LISNews authors might have something to say, hint, hint!

State to pay librarian $108,000 salary

From the Honolulu Star Bulletin:
\"State librarian Virginia Lowell is slated to get a pay raise from the Board of Education tomorrow, which would boost her annual salary to $108,000 from the current $85,302.\"
Full Story

Unlikely kicking guru kick-starts punters

You guessed it, the unlikely guru is a former librarian! In this story from The Nando Times, Geoff Calkins writes:\"You wouldn\'t think she\'d know anything about kicking,\" says James Gaither, the Memphis punter. \"But she knows everything there is to know.\" Meet Carol White, former high school librarian, current kicking guru and possible savior-passing-through at Memphis.\"
Full Story

Librarians are Sexy

That\'s about all there is to it folks: just a short notation in Nick Denton\'s weblog entry for August 27th. Some pretty high praise from the founder of Moreover Technologies which takes online current awareness to a new level. The entry in the \'blog is to Peter Scott\'s list of library weblogs.

Law Librarians as Newscasters

Susannah Crego writes \"I wrote an article on law librarians acting as newscasters in their law firms. It is now available on the Law.com website.
Too many law firms believe librarians are unnecessary. \"Hey, it\'s all available online.\" In order to combat that, law librarians need to do more than just provide legal research assistance. One way-provide news.
The Story is Here
Or go to law.com and click on Law Librarians on the right side of the page. My article is sthe first one in the section titled: \"Breaking News.\"

This is a story not just for Lawbrarians, but for all of us, I think.

Trustees Fire Librarian for Wanting to Improve Services - Entire Staff Quits

When trustees of the Magness, (TN) library fired the librarian for wanting to relocate the library and provide patrons with improved service, the rest of the library\'s employees walked off the job. According to the article, the board member who served Librarian Susan Curtis with a piece of paper stating that \"her services were no longer needed, said, \"The board wants to strive to make the Magness Library more of what the original benefactors described it to be. We can be the cornerstone of Main Street revitalization. The library shouldn\'t just be a dusty, old book depository. Donations like the $100,000 given by Carrier Corporation could open the doors to making the library a place where piano recitals could be conducted and small community plays could be held.\" more... from The Southern Standard. ---- Also be sure and read what the community says about it at the end of the article.

Cartoon converts librarian to hero

jen writes \"They could have done without the \"mild-mannered librarian\" label IMHO.

Monika Antonelli leads a secret life.

By day, she\'s a mild-mannered librarian at the University of
North Texas. In her spare time, she\'s the voice of cartoon
superhero Chiaotzu and a shape-shifting cat called Puar on the popular TV series Dragon Ball Z. \"

Full Story.
I wonder how many other librarians moonlight at such a cool job?

Librarians Adjust Image in an Effort to Fill Jobs

The New York Times reports on the ALA\'s effort to challenge stereotypes about librarians in order to attract young people to the field:

In a Web site promoting a campaign by the American Library Association, librarians ride Harleys, surf and skateboard. They are young and hip. They wear dreadlocks and practice yoga. And like Ms. Garzolini, they are known to enjoy an occasional night at a bar. There is a cook and caterer, a \"popular culture junkie\" who started a hip-hop program for the Cleveland library and a \"surfer dude\" who owns a record company.

Colleges and universities are turning out more library and information science graduates than ever, the association says, but public libraries must compete with the growing number of higher paying jobs in the private sector, a formidable competitor even with the economy slowing. [ More ]

The ALA\'s campaign has been dubbed \"@ Your Library\" - the anti-stereotype part can be found here.

For the record, I was *attracted* to the profession by the stereotypes - I\'ll take quiet, bookish squares over jocks and hipsters any day, thank you very much ;)

Librarians Compared to Executioners

For the Indianapolis Star, Matt Schwartz writes...

\"The guillotine\'s blade is poised above a naked spine. The victim waits silently, his last words already written onto his body. Soon, the blade hits with a thunk. This is no medieval tale. This is right out of the 21st century. The executioner is a librarian. He is cutting out and photographing the pages from bound newspaper volumes and transferring the images to microfilm. His victim, critics say, is Indiana\'s history... Most of the newspapers were thrown away after the process was complete. About half came from bound volumes whose spines were cut away, disbound in library parlance, so the pages could lie flat as they were filmed.\" more...

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