Authors

Doris Lessing's Books to Go to Zimbabwe Libraries

From ABC News:

Nobel Prize-winning novelist Doris Lessing, who died last year, spent her early years in Zimbabwe. She is still giving back to the country whose former white rulers banished her for speaking against racial discrimination.

The bulk of Lessing's book collection was handed over to the Harare City Library (at the corner of Rotten Row and Pennyfeather), which will catalogue the more than 3,000 books. The donation complements the author's role in opening libraries in Zimbabwe, to make books available to rural people.

"For us she continues to live," said 42-year-old Kempson Mudenda, who worked with Lessing when she established the Africa Community Publishing and Development Trust.

"The libraries she helped set up are giving life to village children who would otherwise be doomed," said Mudenda, who said he used to trudge bush paths daily to reach remote villages with books.

Lessing's trust started libraries in thatched mud huts and under trees after the author was allowed to return to Zimbabwe following independence in 1980.

Kent Haruf, Author Of Moving, Colorado-Set Novels, Dies At 71

Novelist Kent Haruf chased writing in his youth, but it wasn't until he was 40 that he'd developed his skills enough to be published. He's best known for National Book Award finalist "Plainsong."

Two minute audio story at NPR:
http://www.npr.org/2014/12/02/367938648/kent-haruf-author-of-moving-colorado-set-novels-dies...

British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94

British mystery and crime novelist P.D. James, whose best-known works featured poet and Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh as a protagonist, has died at age 94, her publisher says.

Phyllis Dorothy James, a baroness and award-winning writer of such books as Shroud for a Nightingale, The Black Tower and The Murder Room, was born in Oxford began writing in her late 30s and published her first novel, Cover Her Face, in 1962.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/11/27/366997584/british-mystery-novelist-p-d-james-...

Ursula K. Le Guin --- "We will need writers who can remember freedom"

Ursula K. Le Guin accepts the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters at the 65th National Book Awards on November 19, 2014.

Author interview - Ben Winters - Last Policeman Trilogy

The Last Policeman trilogy imagines what we would all do if we knew the world would end in six months. Brooke speaks with the author, Ben Winters, about how the media might inform Earth's final days.

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/trilogy-about-end-world/

A Lost Steinbeck Story Resurfaces 40 Years After Author's Death

A short story by John Steinbeck that had never been published before was recently discovered by Andrew Gulli, editor of The Strand magazine. NPR's Arun Rath talked with Gulli about the find.

The lost work was found in a library.

http://www.npr.org/2014/11/16/364545326/a-lost-steinbeck-story-resurfaces-40-years-after-aut...

Roger Ebert's 4 Star Movie Guide and Serendipity

A post on found books, serendipity, and Roger Ebert.

The Medium is the Message

Fifty years ago, Marshall McLuhan published Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man.

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/medium-message-50/

Grossman’s ‘Magicians’ series casts spell on adult readers

Nebula award winner: Eugie Foster

Eugie Foster, the Nebula Award-winning writer/editor had been raising money for cancer treatment; she died September 27th. Her husband posted the following in an update: Eugie Foster, author, editor, wife, died on September 27th of respiratory failure at Emory University in Atlanta. In her forty-two years, Eugie lived three lifetimes. She won the Nebula award, the highest award for science fiction literature, and had over one hundred of her stories published. She was an editor for the Georgia General Assembly. She was the director of the Daily Dragon at Dragon Con, and was a regular speaker at genre conventions. She was a model, dancer, and psychologist. She also made my life worth living.

Memorial service will be announced soon.

We do not need flowers. In lieu of flowers, please buy her books and read them. Buy them for others to read until everyone on the planet knows how amazing she was.

–Matthew M. Foster (husband) -- Read More

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