Authors

If you watched Michael Moore on 60 Minutes

Steve Fesenmaier writes "Last Sunday Michael Moore was interviewed on 60 Minutes. He gave credit to librarians for saving his book "Stupid White Men" from being pulped. Read the ALA Cognotes story that includes a great large picture of Moore with courageous librarian Ann Sparanese."

Booking Authors: Advice from the Pros

\"In 1993 Baker & Taylor issued a 79-page directory listing 140 libraries across the country that were \"ready, willing, and able to host author readings and events.\" In distributing copies of Authors in Libraries: A Guide for Publishers to some 200 members of the Publishers Publicity Association (PPA), B&T sought to encourage publishers to book more of their authors in libraries as part of publicity tours. Despite the excitement that the directory generated among publishers and library programmers, B&T\'s promised updates never materialized, and now, almost ten years later, many of the misperceptions that publishers and librarians have long held about each other still exist—at least when it comes to working together to set up author events.\" (from Library Journal)

Onan the librarian

The Spectator has This Story on Robert Gore-Langton the poet who knew how to offend everyone, the subject of a a new and (by all accounts) sympathetic film coming up on BBC 2.
They say the general view hitherto has been that Larkin (1922–85) was a fine poet but a creep of the first order.

\"Larkin is read today not because he was a Meldrewish curmudgeon, but because he was a genius at writing poetry that illuminates the corners of ordinary life in all its sadness. He was the English verse Sinatra.\"

Big-city cowboy

Indystar.com Has One on Bernard \"Stoney\" Baker, writer of Westerns featuring a fictional black hero also named Stoney Baker.
In the past five years, Baker has written three novels about the American West of the late 1800s. This, and he works at General Motors\' Metal Fabrication Plant just west of Downtown Indianapolis.

\"I feel sometimes like I was born a century too late,\" the 52-year-old Baker says as he relaxes in the UAW Local 23 union hall next to the plant. \"I\'m here in this plant, but actually I\'m not here. I dream of the West, of horses. My dreams are in the wide open.\"

Why Kerouac still matters

The Hoosier Times takes a look at the original manuscript of \"On The Road\" which goes on exhibit Tuesday at IU\'s Lilly Library.
They say from the opening sentence and continually down through the mesmerizing scroll of unpunctuated or unparagraphed prose, there are eyebrow-raising differences between the original text and the book that has been assessed as one of the greatest works of American literature in the 20th century.

\"There\'s quite a difference between the manuscript and the book, In some places there is as much as maybe six inches of text not there. In other places there are very different descriptions of some events.\"
-Jim Canary, head of special collections conservation at the Lilly Library

Australian Authors bank on library lending fee

A Story Out Of OZ says The Australian Federal Government paid $14.2 million to 8500 Australian authors and publishers last year to compensate for people borrowing their books from public libraries and in schools.
Without extra income from government schemes, an author said many would-be Australian authors would be forced to give up.

"There are 260 million people in the US, 67 million in the UK, so it's much harder to make a living from people in Australia," he said.

"If the Australian authors go, then our own culture gets ignored."

Steinbeck\'s treasures

California Online has This Story on the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University.
They have 40,000 Steinbeck related items like the Steinbeck family Bible and the portable on which the Salinas author typed \"Travels With Charley.\"
The center has been around since 1971 when Martha Heasley Cox, English professor, founded it.

Framed \"lobby cards,\" posters advertising movies based on Steinbeck\'s works, cover one wall.

Wife and Husband Compete for British Book Prize

SomeOne sent over A NYTimes Story on Claire Tomalin and Michael Frayn, the first couple ever both to be shortlisted for the Whitbread Book of the Year award.
Ms. Tomalin was placed on the list when she won the biography category, with \"Samuel Pepys: The Unequaled Self,\" her account of the life of the 17th-century diarist and naval administrator. Mr. Frayn is the winner in the novel category, for \"Spies,\" a story of suspicion and half-understood childhood memories set in an English suburb during World War II.

\"All this is new territory,\" Mr. Frayn said ominously, It might just finish us.\"

Lost in literature

Here's A LA Times Story that takes a look at Novelist Larry McMurtry.
He's the author of The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, and Lonesome Dove. At 66, he churned out four novels during the past year. But some time ago he lost interest in reading fiction, preferring to spend his evenings with European history and British diaries. He doesn't travel much anymore, either. He stays put in windblown Archer City, where he taps out books on a manual typewriter, tends a sprawling secondhand-book store, breakfasts at the local Dairy Queen, hosts out-of-town friends on the weekends, complains about the dearth of decent restaurants and, as one of those friends puts it, "lives in his own head."

Solzhenitsyn improving in hospital

Thanks to Christy Z for This BBC Story that says Nobel Prize-winning Russian novelist Alexander Solzhenitsyn is improving in hospital after being treated for high blood pressure, according to latest reports.
In other author news, Jean Kerr died, so did Roy Jenkins and Mary Wesley.

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