Authors

At Google, the Book Tour Becomes Big Business

When Tina Fey visited the Bay Area in April on her book tour for “Bossypants,” she made just two stops. She gave an interview before a sold-out crowd at the Orpheum Theater, as part of the City Arts & Lectures series. And she dropped by the Mountain View headquarters of Google.

Full article at NYT

J. Patrick Lewis Named Children's Poet Laureate

J. Patrick Lewis's wordplay, humor, and technical facility—as well as his love of writing for children—have earned him an important place in history: today the Poetry Foundation named him the nation's third Children's Poet Laureate.

Full article at School Library Journal

John McPhee The Art of Nonfiction No 3

John McPhee, The Art of Nonfiction No. 3
I think we can all agree John McPhee is the greatest nonfiction writer of all time. The Paris Review has a great interview.

"And if somebody says to me, You’re a prolific writer—it seems so odd. It’s like the difference between geological time and human time. On a certain scale, it does look like I do a lot. But that’s my day, all day long, sitting there wondering when I’m going to be able to get started. And the routine of doing this six days a week puts a little drop in a bucket each day, and that’s the key. Because if you put a drop in a bucket every day, after three hundred and sixty-five days, the bucket’s going to have some water in it."

A Book Store. That’s Right. Book, Singular.

A Book Store. That’s Right. Book, Singular.
The book is Mr. Kessler’s account of NASA’s 2008 Phoenix Mars Lander mission, reported during 90 days inside mission control, in Tucson, alongside 130 leading scientists and engineers. Publishers Weekly calls the book a “slightly offbeat firsthand account of scientific determination and stubborn intellect” that “delivers a fascinating journey of discovery peppered with humor.”

The store is part marketing ploy, to be sure (Mr. Kessler is a creative director at an advertising agency), but also part meditation on the meaning of the book in an age of e-readers and a bankrupt Borders.

In Elite Library Archives, a Dispute Over a Trove

In Elite Library Archives, a Dispute Over a Trove
In a move that has turned scholarly heads, Paul Brodeur, a former investigative reporter for The New Yorker, who donated thousands of pages of his work to the library, is demanding that the papers be returned. He claims that an institution renowned for its careful stewardship of historical documents has badly mishandled his.

The charges are roiling the genteel world of research archivists, who usually toil in dust-jacket obscurity, and inciting a lively debate about which pieces of the past are worth preserving.

Three Cups of BS




Author of the book "Three Cups of Tea" on 60 Minutes.

Dean Koontz's dog days

Author Dean Koontz has written more than 100 books - including thirteen number one bestsellers.

"You're incredibly prolific," says CBS' Anthony Mason. "Where does that come from?"

"The imagination's a muscle partly. And the more you use it the easier it becomes," says Koontz.

His success - he ranks number six among the world's best-paid writers - has built him a stunning California home he calls "Amazing Grace," with carved book cases in his library.

Interview transcript and video available at CBS News' Sunday Morning

George R. R. Martin Profiled in New Yorker

This week the New Yorker published a profile of fantasy novelist George R. R. Martin–exploring his relationship with his online fans (and detractors).

Story at Galleycat

Was John Steinbecks Travels With Charley a fraud?

Was John Steinbeck’s Travels With Charley a fraud?
"My initial motives for digging into Travels With Charley were totally innocent. I simply wanted to go exactly where Steinbeck went in 1960, to see what he saw on the Steinbeck Highway, and then to write a book about the way America has and has not changed in the last 50 years."

On Eve of Redefining Malcolm X, Biographer Dies

For two decades, the Columbia University professor Manning Marable focused on the task he considered his life’s work: redefining the legacy of Malcolm X. Last fall he completed “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention,” a 594-page biography described by the few scholars who have seen it as full of new and startling information and insights.

he book is scheduled to be published on Monday, and Mr. Marable had been looking forward to leading a vigorous public discussion of his ideas. But on Friday Mr. Marable, 60, died in a hospital in New York as a result of medical problems he thought he had overcome. Officials at Viking, which is publishing the book, said he was able to look at it before he died. But as his health wavered, they were scrambling to delay interviews, including an appearance on the “Today” show in which his findings would have finally been aired.

Full story

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