Journals & Magazines

Body + Soul Magazine Promotes BookSwim as "Easier" Than Library

Ouch. In the May 2009 issue of Body + Soul magazine--"A Martha Stewart Publication"--"renting a book" via BookSwim is #1 on a list of "6 Simple Ways to Better Your Life and the Planet."

The magazine copy reads, "Looking for a good read? Try renting books Netflix-style with bookswim.com. It's easier than going to the library and greener than buying from the store. Log on and have your picks delivered to your door in recycled packaging."

Cites & Insights 9:6, May 2009, available

Cites & Insights 9:6, May 2009, is now available.

The 28-page issue is PDF as usual, although HTML separates are available for most essays (from the links below).

This issue includes:
Bibs & Blather

Two million and counting: Notes on the first two million words of C&I, including the most widely-read issues (or, rather, "what I know about readership except for the first two years") and most widely-read essays since 2004. Also a note on one "why" for the two major essays--the other "why" being life changes getting in the way of original essays.

Public Library Blogs

Most of the first 65 pages of Public Library Blogs: 252 Examples, excluding some overall lists of included blogs and the individual blog profiles. If the gurus of Andersonomics are right, this free access to most of the overall text will inspire lots of you to go buy the print book... If not, at least the study will get a lot more readership.

Academic Library Blogs -- Read More

University Press Hears Libraries' Pleas and Freezes Journal Prices

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education today records that Rockefeller University Press is freezing the rates of its journal subscriptions for 2010 at the 2009 levels. Although Rockefeller only publishes a few journals, "the symbolic value of the decision, however, should not be discounted".

More on Due Date Stamps

After a story earlier this week about Due Date stamps, Florida's own effing-librarian wrote to Washington Post columnist John Kelly with his thoughts.

Kelly added most of effing's email to his follow-up column, "Okay, So End of Library Stamps Isn't the End of the World.". Effing's stuff is found here fyi, along with opinions from other readers. Isn't it nice when you can start a dialogue?

Special Issues 19(1) published

Special Issues: Bulletin of the Canadian Association of Special Libraries and Information Services has published its latest issue.

Features

Membership Does Have Its Benefits: Student Experiences with CASLIS
Seven students and new professionals discuss how being involved with CASLIS has benefitted them
By Jennifer Green

Gateway to Canada’s Immigration Stories
A profile of Pier 21’s Scotiabank Research Centre
By Lori McCay-Peet

A Fable About Government Libraries and Oz
A commentary about Library and Archives Canada

Conference Tips for Students and New Professionals
Some tips from a first-time attendee.
By Sarah Harvey

Departments

News and Notes
Information Specialist as Detective Contest results… CASLIS Occasional Paper series… Renovation and Revitalizations in Special Libraries… National Summit on Library Human Resources… Freedom to Read and Special Libraries

From the Desk of the President
“In Times Like These…”
By Robyn Stockand

CLA Student Chapters
Bridging the gap between the student and professional worlds
By Emily Reyns, Brittany Trafford, and Tara Forman

Vendor Views
Vend or Foe?
By Heather Berringer

Reviews
Retro Review: Desk Set.
By Astrid Lange

People in the News

CASLIS Almanac
Upcoming events coast to coast

On the Lighter Side
Librarian Zombie Defense League… Unshelved

New, Edgy and Free; LJ's Book Smack Newsletter

Want "high-impact reviews of street lit, genre fiction, graphic novels, audio, and DVDs, along with edgy RA, in-depth prepub info, and industry buzz" direct from seasoned library-type editors?

Then you'll want to sign up for Library Journal's new twice-monthly newsletter BOOK SMACK (where did they get that edgy edgy name??).
Here's where to subscribe.

ACLU challenges Cleveland Heights Schools over Removal of Nintendo Magazine from Library

A principal's decision to remove a magazine from a middle-school library has drawn criticism for the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school board from the American Civil Liberties Union.

The ACLU said the First Amendment was violated when Brian Sharosky, principal of Roxboro Middle School, confiscated the November issue of Nintendo Power magazine. The magazine covers the world of Nintendo video games, from previews and ratings to secret codes and short cuts.

"Literature should not be removed from a school library simply because one person may find it inappropriate," said Christine Link, ACLU of Ohio executive director, in a statement last week. She called for the board to "immediately order that the magazine be reinstated."

Sharosky deemed that particular issue unsuitable for students in grades six to eight because of a "violent figure" on the cover and content about a game that's rated for mature audiences, according to district spokesman Michael Dougherty

The librarian objected, maintaining that staff members -- including the principal -- are supposed to follow the policy for challenging a publication. That starts with submitting a form to the superintendent and ends with a decision by the school board.

Cites & Insights 9:5 available

Cites & Insights 9:5, April 2009, is now available.

The 32-page issue is PDF as usual, with HTML versions (such as they are) for each essay available via the links below.

The issue includes:
Making it Work Perspective: Thinking about Blogging: 1

Do comments make a blog a blog? Is the "blogosphere" imploding? Have conversations moved elsewhere? And some offhand notes about blogs as a median medium, in an "interesting sweet spot in a casual media hierarchy of length, thought and formality."

Perspective: Writing about Reading 2

Ignoring the Death of Serious Reading, which is as specious as the Death of Blogs, the Death of Print Media and even (in my opinion) the Sudden Death of Newspapers, we look at some other reading-related topics--Aliteracy and Online and Print Reading. A third topic somehow moved over into...

Library Access to Scholarship

The Death of Journals (Film at 11). That's the overall title, and no, I don't believe journals are nearing sudden death either...but the topics this time around do relate to journals: Are print journals obsolete? Should professional journals evolve into blogs?

Net Media: Beyond Wikipedia -- Read More

New magazine is Mine.

Time Inc. and Toyota Motor Corp., partnering on new customized print magazine. You can choose content from 5 different publications (from a group of 8). The print edition will be available to the first 31,000 to request it; 200,000 more can get the online version.

Could personalized content work in a print publication, or is just a waste of paper?

Direct link to subscribe is here. (I already requested my copy.)

Seattle P.I.'s Last Print Edition Out Tomorrow

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper will produce its last printed edition on Tuesday and become an Internet-only news source, the Hearst Corporation said on Monday, making it by far the largest American newspaper to take that leap. Thus ends a 146-year run.

But the P-I, as it is called, will resemble a local Huffington Post more than a traditional newspaper, with a news staff of about 20 people rather than the 165 it has had, and a site consisting mostly of commentary, advice and links to other news sites, along with some original reporting. NYTimes and video and commentary from the P.I. itself .

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