Journals & Magazines

Cites & Insights 8:11 (November 2008) available

Cites & Insights 8:11, November 2008, is now available for downloading.

The 26-page issue (PDF as always, but with HTML versions available from links here or at the Cites & Insights home page) includes five essays:
Bibs & Blather: Books and Blogs

Mostly updated versions of Walt at Random posts--library blog books going out of print soon, a progress report on The Liblog Landscape 2007-2008 (with more progress since the post) and notes on Technorati, blogs as a whole and the liblog landscape.

Making it Work: Libraries and the Social Web

Notes on aspects of social-web applications in libraries beyond blogs and wikis.

Perspective: How Common is Common Language?

An original "research" project: What happens when you try 300 everyday sentences against Google--and when you try just the first eight words of each sentence? The answers may surprise you.

Library Access to Scholarship: OA Controversies -- Read More

The Journal of Distance Education - archives now online

The Distant Librarian points out that the Journal of Distance Education has made its complete run of archives (1986-2008) available online. Here's the link from to the posting by The Distant Librarian. There's no mention on whether or not the archive is free, but a browse through shows the option of clicking on HTML full text or PDF for many of the articles.

Sage Publications gives free access to its journals through All Hallows Eve

Sage Publications (Human Factors, Am. J Sports Med, Ed Researcher, etc) is offering free access to all of its Journals until 10/31/08.

Simply register at their site and start reading.

Are journal editors biased against certain kinds of authors?

Social Science Statistics Blog In a working paper entitled "Can We Test for Bias in Scientific Peer Review?", Andrew Oswald proposes a method of detecting whether journal editors discriminate against certain kinds of authors. His approach, in a nutshell, is to look for discrepancies between the editor's comparison of two papers and how those papers were ultimately compared by the scholarly community (based on citations). In tests he runs on two high-ranking American economics journals, he doesn't find a bias by QJE editors against authors from England or Europe (or in favor of Harvard authors), but he does find that JPE editors appear to discriminate against their Chicago colleagues.

Cites & Insights 8:10 (October 2008) available

Cites & Insights 8:10, October 2008, is now available.

The 28-page issue is PDF as usual, although HTML versions of each essay are also available from the Cites & Insights homepage or via the links below.

This issue includes five essays:
Trends & Quick Takes

Improving patents, the future of the internet, why I give Pew such a bad tome, the HD watch, the purloined bibliography and invisible gifts, plus five quicker takes.

Interesting & Peculiar Products

Six of them--including a hockey-puck home theater PC and a digital projector that throws a 98"-diagonal image from 15 inches away--and six Editors' Picks and Group Reviews

Net Media/Making it Work: Blogging about Liblogging

A range of posts and commentary about liblogs and library blogs, some up to a year old, all worth noting.

Offtopic Perspective: 50 Movie Western Classics, Part 2

From the sublime (The Outlaw) to the ridiculous (Gone with the West), with spaghetti westerns, singing cowboys and much more in between--including Bill Shatner playing an arrogant, sexist, tinhorn ruler who doesn't happen to be on a starship but is instead a half-Comanche bad guy (White Comanche)--and Shatner also plays his sort-of-good-guy twin. I couldn't make this stuff up if I tried. -- Read More

New Electronic Journal: The Journal of Library Innovation

The Western New York Library Resources Council is pleased to announce plans to publish The Journal of Library Innovation, one of the first journals devoted explicitly to innovation and creativity in libraries. This peer reviewed, electronic journal will publish original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, letters, as well as book and product reviews. The journal will also welcome provocative essays that will stimulate thought on the current and future role of libraries in an Internet Age.

The inaugural issue will be published in January 2010. Please watch for a call for papers in the near future. For more information, please contact Editor-in-Chief Sheryl Knab (sknab@wnylrc.org) or Managing Editor Pamela Jones (pjones@medaille.edu).

Kenney: It's time for ALA to set its journals free

Brian Kenney: "librarians are the most vocal advocates for open access to journal content—except, apparently, when it’s their own publications. I suspect this is because of ALA’s outdated, carrot-on-the-end-of-the-stick, publishing model: keep the publications locked away as the supreme benefit of membership. "

Finally, there is common sense. If you want your content to be used, then readers need to be able to discover it through a search engine and read it in a click. Or find it in their feed aggregator. We need to be able to forward it, post our disagreements with it, blog about it, and have it pushed to us on Facebook. It must, in short, be integrated into our professional lives. Or else it becomes irrelevant, no matter how good it might be.

A league table of journals

A league table of journals: The Australian government is revising its research assessment system, and is in the process of setting up ERA, Excellence in Research for Australia. This new system was an early commitment of the Labor Government elected in November of last year, and is replacing the Research Quality Framework (RQF) which the previous Government had started to develop in 2006, and which was intended to carve up AU$600 million in block grant research funding. That system did not reach fruition, despite (and partly because of) being very costly. The new system is designed to benchmark Australian research better within an international context, and is - for the moment - not intended to lead to a ranking-based carve-up of the research funding pot, though that option has been left in for the future.

Cites & Insights 8:9 (September 2008) available

Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large 8:9 (September 2008) is now available.

The 26-page issue (PDF as usual, but HTML versions of the individual essays are available using the links below or at the C&I home page) includes the following five essays:
Bibs & Blather: Projects and Rejects

40% less self-indulgent than the five-part post! Some new information! Otherwise, it's largely the same material. If you feel you already know all this, skip right on over to:

Perspective: Updating the Book Discovery Projects

Microsoft dropped its project--and in the process released all limits on 300,000 scanned books and gave the scanners to its partners. That and lots more in this multipart roundup.

Perspective: On Conferences in a Time of Limits

Why do we go to conferences--and will conferences change significantly thanks to high travel costs? Some semi-informed musings and non-predictions.

Old Media/New Media -- Read More

Phone Research Articles

Ok - I know this reply is several years late. In doing a Cuil search, I came across the very kind review by Daniel of a Searcher article I wrote on phone research (I've included that post below). Even years late, his review totally made my day - so many thanks, Daniel.

I just wanted to let anyone interested know that a copy of the article is available for free on my website www.risasacks.com. If it's useful to you - help yourself. There is also a copy of the follow-up, sequel article, "The Search Goes On." Finally, having had an article and a sequel, we had, of course, to write the 'prequel' - 'Before You Pick up the Phone" will be in the September issue of Searcher, and will be available on my website in about three months. If any of these are useful to you, please feel free to download them and pass them on. (and Daniel, I'd love to hear how you found the unlisted number of the Canadian MP).

Excellent article in Searcher about using the phone
Sat, 03/26/2005 - 01:08 — Daniel

The March 2005 (v.13, no.3) print issue of Searcher Magazine has this good article:

Anatomy of a Phone Search: Primary Research Using the Original "Online"
By Risa Sacks, p. 42.

The article is a great primer on picking up the phone to do primary research. Ms. Sacks discusses how much personal information to disclose to people you are interviewing, and how to use referrals from one person to gain entree with another potential source of information. -- Read More

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