Journals & Magazines

Cites & Insights Volume 10 index available

The title sheet and indices for Cites & Insights Volume 10 are now available.

The PDF combines a volume title sheet, two-page index to articles cited, and 13-page general index.

That completes Volume 10. The paperback version will be announced when it's ready.

Cites & Insights December 2010 available

Cites & Insights 10:12 (December 2010) is now published and available for downloading.

The 34-page issue is, as always, in PDF form. Five of the six (6! count them, 6) essays are available separately, using the links below. (As always, My Back Pages is exclusively for PDF readers.)

This is not the end of Volume 10, although it is the last issue as such. A title sheet and indices will follow, probably later in November, and the annual paperback print volume will become available at some point.
Contents
Bibs & Blather (pp. 1-2)

Announcing the publication of disContent: The Complete Collection, a limited-edition casebound. Also updating plans for The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010 and repeating the same info as the paragraph above regarding the rest of Volume 10.

Perspective: Futurism and Deathwatches (pp. 2-17)

Thoughts on good and bad futurism and (always-bad?) deathwatches...including the final disContent column, "'Is Dead' Isn't Dead--But Maybe It Should Be."

The CD-ROM Project (pp. 17-19) -- Read More

Journal of Library Innovation Publishes Second Issue

Journal of Library Innovation has just published its latest issue at
http://www.libraryinnovation.org. We invite you to visit our web site to
review articles and items of interest.

Thank you for your continuing interest in our journal,
Pamela Jones
Medaille College
Phone 716-880-2451
pjones@medaille.edu

Journal of Library Innovation
Vol 1, No 2 (2010)
Table of Contents
http://www.libraryinnovation.org/issue/view/2

Editorials
--------
The Price of Innovation (3-5)
Sheryl Knab

Innovative Practice: Reports from the Field
--------
Quick and Dirty Library Promotions That Really Work (6-14)
Eric Jennings, Kathryn Tvaruzka

Accommodating Community Users in an Authenticated Library Technology
Environment (15-21)
Jonathan T. Younker

Making Physical Objects Clickable: Using Mobile Tags to Enhance Library
Displays (22-28)
Laura Baker

The Library is Undead: Information Seeking During the Zombie Apocalypse
(29-43)
Margeaux Johnson, Amy G. Buhler, Chris Hillman

Reviews
--------
Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming Obstacles Between Vision & Reality (44-45)
Jean Tate Hiebert

The Mobile Marketing Handbook: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Dynamic
Mobile Marketing Campaigns (46-47)
Sarah Passonneau

The Anywhere Library: A Primer for the Mobile Web (48-49)
Justina M. Elmore

Bite-Sized Marketing: Realistic Solutions for the Overworked Librarian
(50-51)
Katie Donahue

Ron Charles Spooktacular Book Review (now with VIDEO!)

OMG, he's lost his bookmark...in the woods...with books he HASN'T even read.

The Washington Post's Ron Charles presents... "I'M NOT A WITCH, I'M A BOOK CRITIC". Guest appearance by author Lisa Scottoline in a reenactment of Hitchcock's shower scene from Psycho. Wild.

Light and Dark in Literary Journals

I was just letting my Wisconsin-bred, serials-acqusitions heart be warmed by the debut of a regional literary journal (Lakeland College's Stoneboat). Then I discovered the news of the temporary closure of the Virginia Quarterly Review due to possible workplace harassment.

The New York Times reports that an audit of the workplace culture is now out.

[edited to fix link]

Cincinnati Library One of the Best

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County has been recognized by Library Journal as a Star Library for 2010 for its level of service. Cincinnati.com has the story.

It is one of 258 public libraries that earned this status out of 7,407 reviewed for the awards, according to a news release issued by the library. Scores are based on 2008 data released by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, according to Library Journal, and scores are determined by rating library visits, circulation, program attendance and public library computer use.

Other Star Library systems recognized this year include Cuyahoga County Public Library, Columbus Metropolitan Library and the Cleveland Public Library, which outscored our local system. Toledo-Lucas County Public Library was 50 points shy of Cincinnati's score, but also made the list, along with several smaller systems in Ohio.

(I did not know this...being an LISNews author is so educational!) Library Journal is a trade publication for librarians founded in 1876 by Melvil Dewey.

Cites & Insights November 2010 available

Cites & Insights 10:11 (November 2010) is now available for downloading.

The 24-page issue is PDF as usual, but HTML separates are available for each essay (click on the essay titles). The issue includes:
Bibs & Blather: Three Times Ten pp. 1-4

Notes about a tenth anniversary, a readership update...and notes and queries about The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010, the nearly-universal English-language liblog project I'm currently working on.

The CD-ROM Project: From Print to CD pp. 4-8

Three different CD-ROMs (and sets) that attempted to add value of some sort to print books or magazines.

The Zeitgeist: Blogging Groups and Ethics pp. 8-18

A brouhaha in one blogging group, thinking about groups and blogs...and thinking about ethics and codes.

Offtopic Perspective: Legends of Horror, Part 1 pp. 18-24 -- Read More

'LJ,' 'SLJ' Virtual eBook Summit Draws 2,500 Attendees

Calvin Reid from Publishers Weekly reports that the one-day online event was extremely successful. The Summit featured a keynote by technologist Ray Kurzweil and more than 15 hours of presentations, "E-Books: Libraries at the Tipping Point" focused on every aspect of the developing e-book market and its impact on public, school, and academic libraries. Held September 29 and organized by Library Journal and School Library Journal, the virtual "summit" on e-books certainly delivered on its promises.

The web meeting brought together more than 40 respected experts (including this reporter and PW features editor Andrew Albanese) from across the spectrum of library professionals, academia, and tech journalism as well as the LJ/SLJ staff. An audience of more than 2,500 digital attendees (representing more than 800 public libraries, over 400 academic libraries, and more than 400 school libraries) attended the one-day virtual conference. Ian Singer, v-p, content & business development for Media Source, parent company of LJ and SLJ (no longer affiliated with PW), said the conference was meant to address the fact that "public and school libraries are struggling to understand the e-book industry. We wanted to bring libraries and publishers together and offer a huge knowledge dump about what e-books are and what the challenges are for libraries."

Did you attend? What did you think of the event?

Penguin Full-Page New York Times Ad Defends 'Speak'

Further to our earlier story about an associate professor at Missouri State U. who referred to the young adult novel "Speak" as "soft pornography," the Penguin Young Readers Group has taken out a full page ad in today’s New York Times to defend the novel by Laurie Halse Anderson.

In an op-ed piece earlier this month in the Missouri News-Leader, Wesley Scoggins wrote that Speak was not appropriate for students of the Republic School District and also challenged Slaughterhouse-Five and Twenty Boy Summer.

From Publishers Weekly: “That such a decorated book could be challenged is disturbing,” said Penguin’s Shanta Newlin about the decision to run an ad. With Banned Books Week now in full swing (Sept. 25-Oct. 2), Penguin believes the ad points to the larger issue of books still being challenged in large numbers across the country, Newlin added. The ad, in fact, notes that "every day in this country, people are being told what they can and can't read," and it asks Times readers to "read the book. Decide for yourself." -- Read More

Lying Librarians and Honest Journalism.

The south Florida paper, the Sun Sentinel has a problem with public libraries.

"Some day in the future, boys and girls might read on their electronic devices about cavernous, well-air-conditioned, book-loaning storehouses from the past. They were called libraries.
...
Book reading devices such as the handheld iPad, the Amazon Kindle, or even a computer laptop, allow readers to download free library books without ever setting foot in a library."

So here is a newspaper, itself an industry on the brink of extinction, bitterly distracting its few final readers from that fact by attacking the local libraries as dinosaurs. Libraries, I should say, account for many of the print editions that the newspaper is still able to sell. Our library probably receives 40 copies of the daily Sun Sentinel. And yet you need to go down 27 paragraphs to get to this:

"The past five years in Palm Beach County have seen staggering growth: Circulation is up 36 percent, visitors 50 percent, and computer users 83 percent, according to the system's statistics."

You can almost hear the "wink, wink" that piggybacks onto the words, "according to the system's statistics," like libraries are making this stuff up. Thanks for the support.

Really, what does it cost to read an ebook, I mean a bestseller?

The Kindle is a minimum $139, but for that price you need a place with wifi to download a book. Add 3G for another $50 to truly be independent. -- Read More

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