Journals & Magazines

'LJ,' 'SLJ' Virtual eBook Summit Draws 2,500 Attendees

Calvin Reid from Publishers Weekly reports that the one-day online event was extremely successful. The Summit featured a keynote by technologist Ray Kurzweil and more than 15 hours of presentations, "E-Books: Libraries at the Tipping Point" focused on every aspect of the developing e-book market and its impact on public, school, and academic libraries. Held September 29 and organized by Library Journal and School Library Journal, the virtual "summit" on e-books certainly delivered on its promises.

The web meeting brought together more than 40 respected experts (including this reporter and PW features editor Andrew Albanese) from across the spectrum of library professionals, academia, and tech journalism as well as the LJ/SLJ staff. An audience of more than 2,500 digital attendees (representing more than 800 public libraries, over 400 academic libraries, and more than 400 school libraries) attended the one-day virtual conference. Ian Singer, v-p, content & business development for Media Source, parent company of LJ and SLJ (no longer affiliated with PW), said the conference was meant to address the fact that "public and school libraries are struggling to understand the e-book industry. We wanted to bring libraries and publishers together and offer a huge knowledge dump about what e-books are and what the challenges are for libraries."

Did you attend? What did you think of the event?

Penguin Full-Page New York Times Ad Defends 'Speak'

Further to our earlier story about an associate professor at Missouri State U. who referred to the young adult novel "Speak" as "soft pornography," the Penguin Young Readers Group has taken out a full page ad in today’s New York Times to defend the novel by Laurie Halse Anderson.

In an op-ed piece earlier this month in the Missouri News-Leader, Wesley Scoggins wrote that Speak was not appropriate for students of the Republic School District and also challenged Slaughterhouse-Five and Twenty Boy Summer.

From Publishers Weekly: “That such a decorated book could be challenged is disturbing,” said Penguin’s Shanta Newlin about the decision to run an ad. With Banned Books Week now in full swing (Sept. 25-Oct. 2), Penguin believes the ad points to the larger issue of books still being challenged in large numbers across the country, Newlin added. The ad, in fact, notes that "every day in this country, people are being told what they can and can't read," and it asks Times readers to "read the book. Decide for yourself." -- Read More

Lying Librarians and Honest Journalism.

The south Florida paper, the Sun Sentinel has a problem with public libraries.

"Some day in the future, boys and girls might read on their electronic devices about cavernous, well-air-conditioned, book-loaning storehouses from the past. They were called libraries.
...
Book reading devices such as the handheld iPad, the Amazon Kindle, or even a computer laptop, allow readers to download free library books without ever setting foot in a library."

So here is a newspaper, itself an industry on the brink of extinction, bitterly distracting its few final readers from that fact by attacking the local libraries as dinosaurs. Libraries, I should say, account for many of the print editions that the newspaper is still able to sell. Our library probably receives 40 copies of the daily Sun Sentinel. And yet you need to go down 27 paragraphs to get to this:

"The past five years in Palm Beach County have seen staggering growth: Circulation is up 36 percent, visitors 50 percent, and computer users 83 percent, according to the system's statistics."

You can almost hear the "wink, wink" that piggybacks onto the words, "according to the system's statistics," like libraries are making this stuff up. Thanks for the support.

Really, what does it cost to read an ebook, I mean a bestseller?

The Kindle is a minimum $139, but for that price you need a place with wifi to download a book. Add 3G for another $50 to truly be independent. -- Read More

Cooler Than a Book...It's BOOKER

Another video book review of the Book Prize Finalists from the Washington Post's hipper than hip Ron Charles:

Cites & Insights September/October 2010 Available

A very special (and very long) Cites & Insights is now available: Volume 10, Issue 10, September/October 2010.

It's at http://citesandinsights.info/civ10i10.pdf, if you're not seeing the links.

The 60-page issue (which, at 1.5MB, may take a little longer than usual to download) is PDF-only and consists of one essay:
But Still They Blog: The Liblog Landscape 2007-2009
Except for a few paragraphs (most of page 56), this is taken entirely from the book But Still They Blog: The Liblog Landscape 2007-2009, which is still available. Page 56 summarizes what's not in the issue--a few graphs, one column of quite a few tables, a substantial portion of one text-only chapter...and all 521 liblog profiles.

Pages 57-60 contain an index to liblog names and people's names within the issue--since it came directly from the Word document used for the book, it was easy to create a new index (the book index uses W0rd's internal indexing features), and a group of advisers from that august body, the Library Society of the World, encouraged me to include it.

Since the issue includes dozens of tables and a fair number of graphs, and since it would be vastly longer in printed-HTML form, no HTML version is provided. -- Read More

eBook Use in Libraries, Survey and Summit

Speaking of ebooks, do you use them in your library? And wouldn't you like to know how widespread their use is in libraries?

LJ/SLJ is taking a survey and wants your participation. It is designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences. This survey is open to all types of libraries, and high level results will presented during LJ/SLJ's first ever virtual summit, ebooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point to be held on September 29, 2010. Detailed results will also be reported in LJ and SLJ later in the fall.

Contest ends September 3. Prizes...including an iPad for one lucky sucker...for your participation! Start here.

August 2010 Cites & Insights available

Cites & Insights 10:9, August 2010, is now available.
The 34-page issue (PDF as usual, but HTML versions of each article are available--the article titles are links) includes:
Perspective: On Social Media and Social Networks pp. 1-10

I no longer believe "Social Media" names anything real--or at least not anything interesting (except to marketers). That's the "tl;dr" version. I think the longer version is worth reading.

The CD-ROM Project pp. 10-13

It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide, which may be all I really need to say about the first of three CD-ROMs reviewed here--in this case, a seven-CD set that works very well.

Perspective: On Words, Meaning and Context pp. 13-18

Do you own your words? If people feel free to moonwalk away from what they say, is it possible to have useful discussions?

Making it Work pp. 18-26

It's summertime (for most but certainly not all C&I readers), and that seems like a good time to deal with some miscellaneous items--sort of a reversion to the old "The Library Stuff" sections. I discuss a baker's dozen worth of posts and library-related discussions. -- Read More

Journal liberation: A primer

Journal liberation: A primer

Given that Nature is one of the most prestigious academic journals now publishing, one that has both groundbreaking current articles and a rich history of older articles, these are strong words. But dropping subscriptions to journals like Nature might not be as as much of a hardship for readers as it once might have been. Increasingly, it’s possible to liberate the research content of academic journals, both new and old, for the world. And, as I’ll explain below, now may be an especially opportune time to do that.

Response from the UC to the Public statement from Nature Publishing Group

Response from the UC to the Public statement from Nature Publishing Group [PDF]

We find this to be an implausible explanation given the remarkably large sums of money others and we already pay to NPG every year. The notion that other institutions are subsidizing “our discount” is nonsensical. If anything, other institutions are simply paying too much.

Cites & Insights article links fixed

The article links for Cites & Insights 10:8 (in this post and on the C&I site itself) have been fixed and should be working.

(Actually, the links were fine; I just misnamed the four files.)

Sorry about that.

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