Internet

Why Clifford Stoll is RIGHT about the internet

Every once in a while the.effing.librarian has a good point....
Why Clifford Stoll is RIGHT about the internet:
Yet for his goofs, Stoll gave me one of the wisest pieces of wisdom, ever. On one television program, he espoused having two computers, one for online and one that never touches an outside network. Because that was the only way to guarantee that your data would be safe. One day, you'll wish you'd listened to him.

The Internet will be a fad with little value

The Internet will be a fad
He thought the Internet had no future. Merely a fad. A passing fancy.
We were reminded of scientist Clifford Stoll yesterday when we posted a photo from when the Internet first came to NPR. MPR News reporter Curtis Gilbert recently stumbled upon a gem from the MPR archives, a 1995 interview with Stoll by MPR host Paula Schroeder. Stoll was promoting his book Silicon Snake Oil (at the same time he also published a Newsweek article titled, "The Internet? Bah!")

"STOLL: I'd say it's not that important. I think it's grossly oversold and within two or three years people will shrug and say, '"Uh yep, it was a fad of the early 90's and now, oh yeah, it still exists but hey, I've got a life to lead and work to do. I don't have time to waste online." Or, "I'll collect my email, I'll read it, why should I bother prowling around the Worldwide Web or reading the Usenet" simply because there's so little of value there."

Do Personal Analytics Make Google Less Creepy?

Do Personal Analytics Make Google Less Creepy?
Unquestionably, there are abuses of user data that go too far. But the truly troubling stories have a halo effect. Early adopter culture is hardening against the idea of any kind of data collection about users. But cultural norms are always changing. Isn't it possible that there are some kinds of data collection that could be valuable to users?

Google itself has begun trying to change the norms around this. It created a new opt-in monthly account activity report that provides Google users with some basic analytics about their Googling habits.

What If You Have A Digital Divide And Nobody Cared?

CNN's online presence is carrying a piece by Amy Gahran that comments on a recent Pew Internet and American Life Project report that notes a lack of interest in the Internet itself by that 20% of the population among other findings.

The full report is available PDF download.

The question that does arise is how the Internet can be irrelevant to a particular part of the American population and why.

Some Notes on Tweeting for Public Libraries

Some Notes on Tweeting for Public Libraries
I've been thinking a lot about public libraries/organizations and social media lately, especially on the differences between Twitter and Facebook. I wanted to jot down some notes about what I think works and what doesn't, & figured I'd share them publicly so that folks can do anything from heartily disagreeing with them in the comments to potentially benefiting from them. I've had a personal Twitter account and followed libraries with it since fall of 2007, but have only recently started tweeting for a library system (about a month now). I still have a lot to learn, but I've also learned a lot. These notes take the form of advice, and it's advice I stand behind, but I'm not claiming to be an expert (highly recommended, by the way: this Geek Girls Guide podcast episode on The Cult of Social Media, which covers, among other things, how often "social media expert"/guru/maven is invoked and why it is often a misapplied phrase).

With no further ado, some thoughts (gentle and otherwise) on tweeting for public libraries...

The next cyber security bill is even worse than SOPA

The next cyber security bill is even worse than SOPA
Just when you thought it was safe to go out on the InterWebs comes a new effort by Congress to put a snoop on every cellphone and two spies in every cable modem. Contrary to what you may have read, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act is not SOPA II. But in many ways, it's worse.

Preserving The Internet... and Everything Else

Preserving The Internet... and Everything Else
Without the Internet Archive, the Internet would have no memory. As the world's foremost expert on backups I cannot emphasize enough how significant the Internet Archive is to the world, to any average citizen of the Internet who needs to source an old hyperlink. Yes, maybe it is just the world's largest and most open hard drive, but nobody else is doing this important work that I know of.

A library website template that allows your patrons to find what they want

The All New Iflux One-Pager: A library website template that allows your patrons to find what they want.
http://influx.us/onepager
About a year ago the partners at Influx released One-Pager, a free template for library websites.
They've updated it and it is better than ever. In fact, good implementations of One-Pager will be better than most library websites.

Pinterest for Libraries

The only way you’ve not heard about Pinterest yet is if you have been totally living under a rock. Allow me to enlighten you. Pinterest is a social photo sharing website, styled like a pin-board, that lets you create and manage theme based photo collection. Not only has it become a rage with home users, it is also being used by businesses and non profits to gather visibility and let people know about them.

Interestingly, libraries too are jumping on to the Pinterest band wagon as well, to encourage visitors to use their services as well to facilitate the library experience of existing users. Here are 20 creative ways libraries around the world are using this new social platform to communicate with the common reader; twenty categories are suggested.

1. Pinning book covers
2. Reading lists
3. Attracting children and teenagers
4. Displaying archives
5. Letting people know about new acquisitions
6. Helping out in research
7. Showing off your library
8. Sharing infographics related to learning
9. Promoting library activities
10. Sharing digital collection
11. Managing reading programs
12. Sharing ideas with parents
13. Bringing focus on library staff
14. Getting new ideas for library displays
15. Collecting ideas for programs
16. Drawing attention to the local community
17. Sharing craft projects
18. Connecting to other libraries
19. Encouraging book clubs
20. Interacting with patrons -- Read More

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