Internet

A Google of Google Stories

Research Buzz says that the Usenet archives are back. You can now search back to May 1995 and find all the old stupid things you said. Google Groups

Techreview has a Story on the next generation of smart search engines.

Wired has A Look at Monika Henzinger, the director of research at Google, and her life as a \"woman\".She says, \"I\'m a scientist. I really think of myself as a scientist.\"

The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine is everything you ever wanted to know on the subject.

InternetWeek takes A Look at google\'s guts. They have about 8,000 servers, had 10.9 million unique visitors in March, has indexed 1.3 Web billion pages on over a petabyte of storage, and does it all on Linux.

The Semantic Web

Scientific American has an Interesting Story by Tim Berners-Lee (you may know him from such projects as the WWW) on what they call \"The Semantic Web\"
The Semantic Web will bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can readily carry out sophisticated tasks for users. Kinda like what librarians do now.

E-libraries hoping to profit

siliconvalley.com has a Story on a few companies going after the college student market by collecting academic texts that readers can search and view via the Web on any PC. They say college students are \"very attractive to us because of the photocopying and research they do\". Attractive college students... I know there\'s a joke there somewhere.

``The expected market growth will not occur quickly enough to meet the profitability imperatives of all players currently in the market, particularly those with high burn rates and questionable value propositions,\'\' Eduventures.com\'s Chen wrote in a February report.

More Fun With Studies

The PIP recently released the results of a rather uninteresting study that was reported almost everywhere for some reason.

They asked \"How concenered are you about the following types of internet crime\", and \"Which one of these types of Internet crimes converns you the MOST\".

From those 2 questions they draw this conclusion:
\"... and 50% of Americans cite child porn as the single most heinous crime that takes place online\"
Did I miss something there?
The #1 answer in to both questions was Child Pornography, but how did they arrive at that conclusion?

SiliconValley.com put it best when they said, \"People least worried about big Internet risk\".

eMarketer.com has a the Report broken down with lots of nifty charts and grafts.
So what have we learned here?
People worry about child pornogrphy [Which is horrible, awful and should be illegal, but doesn\'t come after you and steal your stuff], meanwhile they\'re being DOS\'d, or a Cracker [Note: not Hacker] just grabbed their credit card numbers.

If you are so inclined, you can actually go Read The Full Report. -- Read More

Web Freedom Lost

CNET has This Story that says A combination of new technologies, recent laws and international restrictions--sometimes related, more often not--are making possible a kind of online regulation once thought impossible.

Meanwhile, More than 60 federal Web sites violate U.S. privacy rules by using unauthorized software to track the browsing and buying habits of Internet users, according to a congressional report, Full Story @ CNN

The BBC simply says \"Cybercops arrest online liberty\"
This Story on your slowly eroding freedoms online.

Wired takes a look at a different kind of censorship in This Story on the increasing power of corporations.

What\'s doing at Yahoo!

A Story on Yahoo! is making the rounds.
They say searching for anything related to the words
\"Nazi,\" \"Ku Klux Klan\" or even \"hate\" on Yahoo! will now
bring up banners promoting peace and tolerance. It
doesn\'t work for me, but maybe this is a plan for the
future.
In other Yahoo! news...Now you See Boobies and
Now You Don\'t. They started to peddle
porn, but gave up when groupd like the AFA put up a
fuss.Remember, if you don\'t like it, that means it\'s
no good for anyone.

Jeffrey Zeldman on NewBreed

If you haven\'t checked out this months NewBreedLibrarian you missed an Interview with Jeffrey Zeldman, and and Cool Report from the ACRL conference in Denver.

There\'s also a neat Interview were they asked three students at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign why they chose to pursue an MLS.
I got my MLS to meet more women, live the Rock-N-Roll Lifestyle, and make millions so I can retire at 25.Things haven\'t worked out so well for me....

Why Not .lib

Ever wonder why We don\'t have our own TLD?That is, why there is no LISNews.lib, or loc.lib.
Well, Searcher Magazine has a Story to answer your questions!


One reason was it cost $50,000 to apply for, another, who would run it? I\'m sure we\'re all looking forward to those exciting new .aero\'s!

Surfing by Degrees

[Here...] comes still another Internet study, as if we need one, which attempts to herd users into categories based on \"occasionalization\" (their word not mine or Webster\'s). I wonder how much they charged for that anyway? Try to win that one on Wheel...Vanna, I would like an \"E\" please.
So, which group do you fall under?

Search engines grapple with constant Web growth

CNN has A Look At search engines.

With the internet over 550 billion pages, they say much of the most interesting and valuable content remains hard to find, and search engines are just having a hard time keeping up.
I never seem to have any trouble, is it just me?

Meanwhile This Story talks about the The Internet Engineering Task Force and it\'s work to keep things moving.

And the USA Today wonders aloud if the Net\'s free ride is ending. Will we have to pay for Yahoo! in the future?

Syndicate content