Internet

Searches bringing up more pay-for-placement

With all the dot.coms trying to find ways to make money, more and more search engines are asking for $$ to show up higher in search results. The Mercury News has a story that even mentions librarians and their current love for google. Blame this garbage on the online advertising slump, they say. traffick.com has a Story that says Search Engines Must Continue to Be Referees - fair arbiters of relevance - or consumers will gravitate to different sources of information.

``The idea of paid placements would have never been entertained in years prior,\'\' said Danny Sullivan, who writes the Search Engine Watch newsletter. But now, ``we\'re having more and more paid placement and other paid programs\'\' on search engines.\"

Contenders for the Crown: Six E-Libraries

eduventures.com has what looks like An Interesting Report on what the call eLibraries.

\"E-libraries are poised to become an important component of the e-learning industry, particularly in the higher education market. A major impetus for the e-library industry\'s growth is its acceptance by publishers and other content providers. Virtually every major publisher - including Pearson, McGraw Hill, and Houghton Mifflin - has signed agreements to distribute works via e-libraries.


The six leading e-library firms profiled in the report are Questia, XanEdu, ebrary, Britannica.com, Jones e-global Library, and NetLibrary. Within the next year, e-library businesses will seek to prove the merits of their business models by gaining market acceptance. However, the long-term success factors for e-libraries will be content, channels to end-users, and connection to curriculum.\"


You Download a free overview of the report Here, it\'s a PDF. The full report is not free, you can only read the overview for free.

law would erase free Web users anonymity

Freep.com has an Article on new legislation that would require
free Internet service providers to collect more
information about subscribers, eliminating anonymity.
They use the excuse that child pornographers are
hiding behind untraceable free Internet e-mail
accounts.

\"What they\'re proposing to do verges on being
unconstitutional. There is a right to free speech and to
be anonymous in this country and law enforcement is
way out of line in trying to force the collection of
identifiable information because of a perceived
problem with a miniscule part of the online
population.\"

Extending to the Internet

A Nice Story from Infotoday on how libraries need to use and improve their Internet presence. Your libraries web site can be used as a portal to guide your patrons to the information they need, and that makes a good first impression, and brings your patrons back for more!

The Electronic Commons

The American Prospect has a Story that advocates Building a Global Public Library out of the internet. They say this could have significant benefits for traditional, bricks-and-mortar libraries that face burdens from growing costs.

\"Instead of trying to maintain large collections, especially of infrequently used materials, conventional libraries will increasingly reconfigure themselves as information centers that provide guidance and access to online sources, some of which will be commercial and impose new charges. The development of more extensive, trustworthy online sources in the public domain will make this transition more affordable and desirable. \"

Open Science Online

The American Prospect has a Story on PubMed Central and The open-source approach to publishing on the internet.

\"The open-source business model takes explicit advantage of this dynamic. So could biomedicine. As digital networks develop, the role of the major medical journals as the exclusive purveyors of certain kinds of data may well become obsolete, but their role in framing and interpreting the data will be ever more in demand.\"

URLs Just Fade Away...

Lee Hadden writes:
\" A new study by Philip Davis and Suzanne Cohen of Cornell studied the
citation use of undergraduate students in Economics 101 over a period of
three years, 1996-1999. They found that most of the URLs are no longer
effective; that the use of printed book citations have dropped from 30% to
19%; that there has been a substantial increase in the use of popular,
un-referreed materials such as newspaper articles has increased from 7 to
19%, and that web citations have increased from 9 to 21%. Effectively,
scholarly use of library materials have dropped in favor of web-based
services available in the rooms of students. There is a need for college
professors to insist on greater use of refereed and academic resources by
their students.


Their research will be printed in a forthcoming article in the Journal
of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS), due Feb. 15, Vol.
52 (4). Read more about it- a preprint of the article is available at:
people.cornell.edu/pages/pmd8

Dubya Exits the Information Superhighway


This Story
from Capitolhillblue
says President Bush has now \"exited the information
superhighway\" avoid having his e-mail become public,
something I\'m sure BIll Gates, and Bill Clinton wish
they would\'ve done.

     \"Now that presidential e-mail is subject to
open records, it\'s going to be a phone-call
relationship,\" Bush said.

Mining the \'Deep Web\' With Specialized Drills

The NYTimes has an Interesting Story on search engines. They say regular search engines have access to only a fraction of 1 percent of what exists on the Web and as many as 500 billion pieces of content are missed. They talk about specialty search engines like Moreover, a site I use all the time for LISNews. It\'s nice to see some very positive things said about librarians in this one.

\"People may know to come to the library, but they probably do not know which reference books to pull off the shelf. Of course, in such cases, patrons can at least consult a reference librarian. On the Web, people are usually fending for themselves.\"

That\'s my final search!!

My friend sent in this story from Wired. I don\'t mean to be crude, but the only difference between this game show and the \"actual\" daily life of a librarian is that the payoff is greater.\"Web Challenge has no rules regarding which search engine contestants use, or how many browser windows can be open simultaneously. Contestants bypass search engines and go directly to informational sites such as GolfDigest.com or the Internet Movie Database to get their answers. The first team to find the right answer wins $150. But if no one answers correctly within the two-minute time limit, the prize is forfeited.\" -- Read More

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