Internet

How to free refereed literature online

Wired has a nifty Story on E-Journals. With the big puch to E-Publish Journals some insist that simply publishing electronically is not enough --and that open, free access to the full content is needed. Critics insist that peer review is critical to ensure quality control and patient safety. Without peer review, researchers may exaggerate their findings. Some people say that faster publication time compromises quality, others insist that the benefits of electronic publication remain unparalleled by print. So far, few online-only journals have managed to survive.

\"These new online journals will give scientists an alternative,\" Cockerill said. \"They will finally be able to publish their research in high-quality journals, with full peer review, but without surrendering control to a publisher that will limit the subsequent distribution of that research.\" \"There\'s already a threat to paper journals,\" Kassirer agreed. \"Unless journals get on the Internet, their life is threatened.\"

Wasssup With The Web

SF Gate has a Story on the Digital Divide and how it is still growing, as some racial minorities, the disabled, and low-income families are not jumping online as fast as others.

In other Net News...

The NY Times has a Story on the a Florida appeals court that declared Internet service providers must divulge the identities of people who post defamatory messages on the Internet. This could be a big can of worms!

Trouble brewing for on-line publishers.

The Pfeiffer Report has an interesting Report on online publishing. They say all is not well in the online world, no one is making and money, and that spells trouble. They say since there is no way of supporting the considerable cost of on-line publications, they will begin to fold up shop. Now in the fututre the online versions of magazines and newspapers will simply be an extension of the print versions. Could on-line content really be on the verge of going out of fashion? Is it all about profit?

\"Traditional publishers will be able to incorporate on-line activity as part of the overall publishing project; some major sites will be able to survive with ad-revenues and associated income streams. But for most publications (in other words, the on-line equivalent of the thousands of magazines which fill newsstands around the world) it is still not quite clear what a valid on-line business model could look like\"

Free Scholarly Electronic Journals

Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship has a rather interesting Article on electronic journals. This is very interesting, they say with well over 1,000 free journals out there, there are several high-quality and useful journals available, free.

\"A fairly comprehensive list of free scholarly electronic journals in the science, technology, and medical fields was compiled and was examined using citation analyses. The results indicate that, unlike the situation five years ago, there are several free scholarly electronic journals that have a significant impact on their respective fields.\"

The Internet Made Them Do It

I thought I would post this quote from George Bush, from the debate on October 11, 2000. The question was about the differences on gun control. Anyone have any comments?


But let me say something about Columbine. And listen, we\'ve got gun laws. He says we ought to have gun-free schools. Everybody believes that. I\'m sure every state in the union has got them. You can\'t carry a gun into a school, and there ought to be a consequence when you do carry a gun into a school.


But Columbine spoke to a larger issue, and it\'s really a matter of culture. It\'s a culture that somewhere along the line we begun to disrespect life, where a child can walk in and have their heart turn dark as a result of being on the Internet and walk in and decide to take somebody else\'s life.


So gun laws are important, no question about it, but so is loving children and character education classes and faith-based programs being a part of after-school programs.\" -- Read More

Authority Control on the Web

Barbara B. Tillett, Ph.D. The Director, Integrated Library System Program Office at The LOC has written a nice presentation given at The Bicentenial Conference on Bibliographic Control for the New Millennium. The Full text of her paper is available, or the Summary is
here. She talks about the current trends taking shape in this area, like the DC for Authorities and the basic data elements recommended in the IFLA \"Minimal Level Authority Record\", and The Dublin Core.

Publishers invest in online library

Random House, Bertelsmann, and McGraw Hill are ganging up to make an investment in online library company ebrary. They are putting up a collection of books, journals, maps, periodicals, and digitally archived material, and they say most of this was previously inaccessible via the Web. No membership or subscription fees, but printing will cost you.

\"\"As a publisher -- as well as an investor -- we welcome this innovative yet practical approach to making content available to all in digital form, using a model that will also bring our authors additional revenue while safeguarding their copyrights from unauthorized exploitation,\" said Richard Sarnoff, president of Random House Ventures, in a statement.\"

Ebrary\'s site says it\'ll launch in Fall of 2000.Implications for traditional libraries?

Factors Affecting the Usability of Web Sites

Computer-Mediated Communication Magazine has a nice Article on the usabilty of web sites.

\"This article contemplates factors affecting the usabilty of web sites. It addresses issues from both the disciplines of psychology and computing and attempts to consider the relevance of these issues with regards to a study carried out at the Centre for Information Environments Research at Brunel University. The study was developed in order to investigate issues affecting the usability of web sites. A test site was created and investigations revealed some interesting findings, some of which are detailed in the article.

The Latest at COPA

This Story, from Wired, gives an update on
the Commission on Child Online Protection [COPA]unanimously endorsed a largely hands-off approach to the Internet, while saying that practices such as mislabeling adult sites as innocuous should be against the law. The final report does not recommend additional criminal laws or a .xxx or .sex top-level domain. Instead, it calls for more \"public education\" and \"responsible adult empowerment.\"

Be sure to check out the COPA Research Papers , a collection of Pro and Con reports from a wide spectrum of folks on both sides of the debate, including:
European Union, Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, Morality in Media, OCLC Office of Research, Peacefire.org, and U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Science.

Metadata to the Rescue?

Internet
World
has a nice
Story
that likens the internet to a library where
books are strewn across the floor rather than arranged
in neatly organized stacks. They say libraries have
\"metadata\": specific descriptive elements like \"subject\"
and \"author\" that are recorded and indexed in a
standardized way, unlike the net, which is a big mess.
Maybe The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative will finally
take off.?

\"What we see is that the necessary expertise to
develop metadata applications is declining,\" says
Stuart Weibel, co-director of the Dublin Core Metadata
Initiative.

Syndicate content