Internet

Why the Open Directory Is not Open

Andrew Goodman writes \"Close scrutiny of the Open Directory Project (www.dmoz.org) is uncovering a series of series flaws in this and other volunteer-edited directories.
http://www.traffick.com/story.asp?StoryID=59
\"


\"Open Directory Category Editors are volunteers -- indeed, an army or self-governing republic of net-citizens -- but their numbers are, nonetheless, finite. It\'s not open to all comers. A recent scathing commentary by one disgruntled ex-editor, Gary Mosher, has described the army of editors as \"as a horrible mix of corrupt generals and untrained privates,\" since \"there are only two kinds of \'guide\' volunteer: The passionate, often self-interested, \'subject spammer\' and the virtuously motivated, but web-ignorant, \'want-to-belonger\'.\" -- Read More

DoubleClick backs off

Yahoo\'s News reports that we are safe from prying eyes for now.


Bowing to intense pressure from government authorities, investors and privacy advocates, Web advertising firm DoubleClick on Thursday backed off plans to amass a giant online database of people\'s names and Internet habits.`This is a great first step forward for Internet privacy,\'\' said Ari Schwartz of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington-based group that tracks civil liberties on the Internet.

``Companies will better recognize they have to take privacy into account before building technologies or
business practices on the Internet,\'\' he said.

What are the search engines up to?

Someone recommended this story at onlineinc, quick updates on the major search engines, read it Here.

All the major search engines are covered. AltaVista, Ask Jeeves, Dogpile and the rest of the major search engines have new developments.

Study Finds Heavy Internet Users Are Isolated

The Washington Post has a not so suprising story about how the internet is changing our lives.

The Internet is creating a class of people who spend more hours at the office, work still more hours from home, and are so solitary they can hardly be bothered to call Mom on her birthday.

Those are some of the conclusions of a major new study of Internet users conducted by Stanford University\'s Institute for the Quantitative Study of Society. But even before its official unveiling here today, the survey of 4,113 people was receiving extensive criticism, guaranteeing another round of debate over the effect of this new technology.


\"We\'re moving from a world in which you know all your neighbors, see all your friends, interact with lots of different people every day, to a functional world, where interaction takes place at a distance,\" said Norman Nie, a Stanford professor of political science and director of the institute. \"Can you get a hug, a warm voice, over the Internet?\" -- Read More

All knowing search tool

Story from PCWorld on a new program called kenjin. You can download it HERE.


Unveiled earlier this week at the Demo 2000 conference in Palm
Springs, California, the free downloadable program is a
\"behind-the-scenes\" search engine. It reads and analyzes the text
on your screen, picks out the major themes, and then combs the
Internet for links related to those subjects.

Kenjin works with almost any sort of document, whether you\'re
working in a word processor or writing an e-mail message.
There\'s no need to activate your browser, no need to type in
cumbersome Web addresses and keywords. You just need to be
connected to the Internet.

19 clicks of seperation

Barbara Shapiro writes \"Fascinating article about how the Web is developing same structure as plant life. Here at the Seattle Times\"

This is a really neat article that claims the average degree of seperation on the web is 19 clicks. If you buy the 6 degrees theory, this is very similar.

Thus was born the \"19 clicks of separation\" theory of
the Web. This scientific effort to size the Web has
helped reveal the organic way in which the global
network is growing.

Like the celebrated \"six degrees of separation\" that
supposedly can connect any two people on the planet,
researchers at the University of Notre Dame recently
estimated that any two randomly selected sites on the
Web are connected, on average, by 19 clicks.
The Notre Dame team says, on average, you can get
from one site on the Web to any other randomly
selected site in about 19 clicks.

Crackers still at it

One of Many Stories on the recent wave of DOS attacks on major web sites.

News.com also has a nice Wrap up story that explains how this kind of thing happens.

The weapons used to execute \"denial of service\" attacks, which crippled major Web sites this week, have existed in rudimentary form for decades. But security experts say several effective assault tools that help automate the launch of such attacks have been released only recently.

With names like Trinoo, Tribal Flood Network and Stacheldraht (German for \"barbed wire\"), these tools take advantage of otherwise innocent computers connected to the global network to launch a vast flood of traffic at their targets.

The Slashdot Effect

Slashdot.org is the inspiration for lisnews.com (as some of you were nice enough to point out). Forbes has a fantastic Story Here on slashdot, and the hordes of readers they have. If you\'ve ever visited slashdot, this story will be worth a read.

With an active readership estimated to be as high as 700,000--staggering by new-media standards--Slashdot has become a Web leviathan. \"[For] geeks like me,\" he chuckles, \"Slashdot is different. People who are just like you comment on it--people who actually know sometimes what they\'re talking about.\" -- Read More

Ebay hit with antitrust suit

infodude writes \"Auction aggregator Bidder\'s Edge has filed an antitrust lawsuit against eBay Inc., charging that the auction giant engages in unfair business practices and is trying to monopolize the online auction market.

The Computer World Article \"

EBay is trying to stop Bidder\'s Edge from accessing eBay and then placing eBay product and price information on its own site. In addition, eBay\'s lawsuit alleges that Bidder\'s Edge, which lists information from numerous auction sites, engages in unfair business practices and computer fraud.

Information Seeking on the web

First Monday, \"A Peer reviewed Journal\", has a short study on how people search. See it HERE,

This paper presents findings from a study of how knowledge workers use the Web to seek external information as part of their daily work. Thirty-four users from seven companies took part in the study. Participants were mainly IT specialists, managers, and research/marketing/consulting staff working in organizations that included a large utility company, a major bank, and a consulting firm.

The research presented here suggests that people who use the Web as an information resource to support their daily work activities engage in a range of complementary modes of information seeking, varying from undirected viewing that does not pursue a specific information need, to formal searching that retrieves focused information for action or decision making. -- Read More

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