Information Architecture

A Tool to Verify Digital Records, Even as Technology Shifts

Simple-to-use digital technology will make it more difficult to distort history in the future.

On Tuesday a group of researchers at the University of Washington are releasing the initial component of a public system to provide authentication for an archive of video interviews with the prosecutors and other members of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Rwandan genocide. The group will also release the first portion of the Rwandan archive.

This system is intended to be available for future use in digitally preserving and authenticating first-hand accounts of war crimes, atrocities and genocide.

Such tools are of vital importance because it has become possible to alter digital text, video and audio in ways that are virtually undetectable to the unaided human eye and ear.

Full story here.

LibraryThing Calls for New Cataloguing Scheme

With all the talk of Dewey or Don't We...

Gawd I'm getting tired of that phrase.

Anyway, with all the talk of whether or not libraries should use DDC, LCCN, BISAC, or something else for their collections and then the possibility of using open databases instead of OCLC, it seems like cataloguing is on everybody's mind.

It is over at LibraryThing too, where they've issued a call for the creation of OSC, or the Open Shelves Classification. They're looking for a few librarians who are of a mind to create a system that's free, "humble," modern, open source, and crowd sourced. Indeed, they want something that the library profession has needed for a long time - a modern system capable of changing, and changing easily.

So if you're of the cataloguing bent, check it out.

Happy Holidays: FBI Gives Web Site Attack Preventative Measures

The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center puts out press releases from time to time relative to online security. The one released today contains 12 recommendations for hardening online presences against attack. With some vacation periods coming up, the vulnerability of library systems may be higher than usual which would necessitate at least some action.

LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #51

This week's episode is characterized by variety. The episode kicks off with a recap of stories that might have flown below the radar. After that the program talks to Evan Prodromou, the creator of the Laconica software that operates sites site as TWiT Army and Identi.ca. From there the podcast took a look at a musical program at the West Charleston branch of Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. After that there is a mix of Linux and open source news followed by another installment of Tech for Techies. After Tech for Techies the episode wraps up.

Links referred to:
Site to download Laconica
Guitar Society of Las Vegas
Download location for openSUSE 11.1-RC1
Download location for stable openSUSE releases
Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope Daily Builds
OpenSolaris download site
Download location for TinyMe
Koha download site
Evergreen download site
Greenstone download site
OpenOffice.org download site
MarcEdit download site
Details about the Free Culture Showcase competition
The referenced wiki page showing all competitors entered so far
Announcement from TWiT Live about their mixer
MacBreak Weekly recorded without a mixer

36:25 minutes (8 MB)
mp3
[audio-player]

Social network site Pownce to close on December 15th

Leah Culver wrote at the Pownce blog that the Pownce service will be shut down on December 15th. Prior to that date users will be able to export their data from Pownce to another system like Wordpress by visiting http://pownce.com/settings/export/. The blog of services provider Six Apart notes that two of the developers of Pownce will be joining the team there on Vox and that Kevin Rose as well as Daniel Burka will be advisers to Six Apart.

{UPDATE@2200UTC: The developer behind Identi.ca has a blog post up mentioning migration possibilities and Identi.ca possibly accelerating its growth in response. RSS inventor Dave Winer also has some thoughts}

The Online Search Party: A Way to Share the Load

OPPORTUNITIES for social networking abound on the Internet, but not when it comes to one standard job: using a browser and search engine to comb the Web for information. That task is still typically done solo, because browser displays and search procedures have traditionally been designed for a single user.

Now tools are being developed by Microsoft and other companies that let people at different computers search as a team, dividing responsibilities and pooling results and recommendations in a shared Web space on the browser display as they plan a family vacation, for instance, or research a medical problem.

Full story here.

Also in article: SearchTogether, by contrast, actively supports a group search, said Michael Twidale, an associate professor at the graduate school of library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, who studies people’s strategies for conducting research jointly.

“SearchTogether addresses a real need,” he said. “People searching for information often want to interact with other people. But most of our information retrieval systems fail to recognize this.”

OCLC Claims Ownership of Data In OPACs

OCLC may be trying to pull something sneaky with its new policy of claiming contractual rights over the subsequent use of data created by OCLC. In other words, the data in library catalogues couldn't be used to make anything which competes with OCLC in any way.

Needless to say, this would have a hash chilling effect on the creation of open databases of library content.

As you might expect, the library blogosphere is on fire with the news. The podcast presenter at LISNews gave a commentary in the matter during LISTen #47.

Story from Slashdot.

Greenstone 2.81 Released

David Bainbridge from the Greenstone team posted a release noting that a new version of the package was released. Greenstone originates from New Zealand at the University of Waikato. Relative to the changes in the new release, Bainbridge wrote:

The main focus has been on multilingual support. Improvements include handling filenames that include non-ASCII characters, accent folding switched on by default for Lucene, and character based segmentation for CJK languages.

This release also features our new installer, which is 100% open source. Previously we had relied on a commercial program for this, which incurred a significant cost in keeping up to date; consequently we decided to develop our own installer, based on the excellent open source installer toolkits already available.

There are many other significant additions in this release, such as the Fedora Librarian Interface (analogous to GLI, but working with a Fedora repository). See the release notes for the complete details.

The post gives details on downloading the release as well as daily builds.

Night of the Living Map

Dan Roam, the author of The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures, has an author's blog on Amazon. He has a blog entry called "Night of the Living Map", that is about the electoral map that was used during the election and how he viewed election information on the night of the election.

Second Generation Kindle?

Cali Lewis of GeekBrief.TV highlighted the leak of possible photos of a new Kindle model. Cali's source has more.

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