Employment & Work Stories

Interested in an Internship at Library of Congress This Summer?

Here's an opportunity for talented college-age students headed for the field of LIS:

This summer the Library of Congress once again is offering special 10-week paid internships to college students. For a stipend of $3,000, the 2011 class of Junior Fellows Summer Interns will work full-time from May 29 through Aug. 3, 2012, with Library specialists and curators to inventory, describe and explore collection holdings and to assist with digital-preservation outreach activities throughout the Library.

In addition to the stipend (paid in bi-weekly segments), interns will be eligible to take part in programs offered at the Library. Applications will be accepted online only at usajobs.gov , keyword: 308129000, from Friday, Jan. 27 through midnight, Monday, Feb. 27. For more details about the program and information on how to apply, visit www.loc.gov/hr/jrfellows/. Questions about the program may be sent to interns2012@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is an equal-opportunity employer. Women, minorities and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply. [ed. note: not positive about transgendered individuals, see previous story on LISNews.] -- Read More

Students Save School Librarian's Life

Students Save School Librarian’s Life
Students at Piper Elementary are being recognized for their life saving efforts. The school held an assembly on Friday to honor Mrs. Ward’s first grade class.

The librarian had an apparent heart attack while the students were using the library a couple of weeks ago.

Trolley helps lighten load for librarians

Trolley helps lighten load for librarians
Moving up and down, depending on weight, meant the book needed was always on top, at an easy-to-reach level, he said.

He said the prototype trolley would put an end to bending and stretching into deep book bins, a daily problem for librarians.

Mataura librarian Julie de Villiers approached the engineering company about the problem.

"She had heard about hydraulic-based bins in the UK libraries but could not find anything like them in New Zealand, so she came to us," Mr Clarkson said.

Egyptian librarians found first union

Egyptian librarians found first union
Over 200,000 librarians, archivists and information specialists in Egypt today can organise themselves via an official union. In the presence of Minister of Culture Shaker Abdel-Hamid and head of the National Library and Archives Zein Abdel-Hadi, who is also a librarian by profession, the founding conference of the new union was held at the National Library premises with representatives from the governorates of Monufiya, Daqahlia, Qena, Kafr El-Sheikh and others.

Gift Cards for Library Employees a No-No

Good intentions. Bad idea. Those words summarize the recent attempt by Live Oak (GA) Public Libraries Director Christian Kruse to spend nearly $23,000 in library funds on gift cards for 166 employees.

The cards were valued at $50, $100 and $200 and were meant to recognize part-time and full-time employees after about three years of stagnant salaries and increased health care costs, Kruse said.

He said the cards were meant to be a small token for the work the staff does and were paid for with surplus revenue from a special fund from book sales, fines and fee revenue. Finance Director Neal Vickers later said revenue from copying and printing fees was used.

One problem is the gift cards may have violated restrictions on the use of public funds, according to state officials.

The gratuities clause of the Georgia Constitution prohibits the use of public funds for gifts or bonuses, said Ronald Watson, director of the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts’ education division. A state audit of the library probably would cite the purchase as improper, he said.

Any money that comes from library operations, which are state supported, should be invested in operations, and gift cards don’t qualify, Watson said. More from Savannah Now.

Welcome to Amazon Town

"Retired 'Workampers' Flock to Remote Towns for Temporary Gigs...a sort of modern-day migrant worker. Many of them are retirees who spend all or part of the year living in RVs and taking odd seasonal jobs around the country. While some workers really need the money, others said they take the gigs to help fund their adventures or just for fun."

More from the Wall Street Journal.

Few takers for library science in India

Few takers for library science
If estimates presented in a study by the librarian at the Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad (MICA) Shailesh Yagnik are to be believed, currently 2,22,350 people are engaged in libraries in higher secondary institutions, general colleges, professional colleges, central libraries and district and town libraries.

According to him, despite the higher potential of growth in LIS education, students are not interested in taking up the course.

If I were a poor, out-of-work librarian

Holy Crap. Some guy at Forbes wrote an article called, "If I Were A Poor Black Kid." Why a poor, black kid? Why didn't he just say, "If I were a kid"? If you remove "poor black" from his essay, it still makes grammatical sense AND it doesn't sound like some WHITE guy just got total amnesia about our history. So if you read the article, just try to ignore that it's completely misplaced advice, but try to focus on the details. Otherwise, damn, he sounds stupid.

With that in mind, I'm going to attempt to solve all the problems of the out-of-work librarian. And it will probably sound just as stupid.

IF I WERE A POOR OUT-OF-WORK LIBRARIAN.

If you're a librarian and unemployed, I don't need to tell you that there are lots of other librarians out there looking for a job.

If I were a poor, out-of-work librarian, I would read "If I Were A Poor Black Kid." And I would do what the author says to do about "getting technical." Most of this stuff can be learned through your local library. I hope you knew that.

If possible, I would learn another language. As much as I could. I would give up my free time and devote every second to making myself the most attractive candidate for the job. But for now, I'll assume you've made it past the application stage and have been called for an interview. -- Read More

Howard facing lawsuit after librarian found guilty of sexual misconduct charges

Howard facing lawsuit after librarian found guilty of sexual misconduct charges
Five Howard University students have filed suit in federal court alleging that school officials did not do enough to protect them from an employee later convicted of sexual harassment and assault.

The students, all women, say that a librarian, their work-study supervisor at Howard University’s Founders Library, verbally and physically assaulted them from September 2010 to April 2011. The suit alleges that even though students complained about his conduct, nothing was done until D.C. police were notified.

Talking About Salaries...in Topeka

With two master’s degrees and her own business, Terry Miller can help a small business owner make a marketing plan or a new entrepreneur perform market segmentation analysis.

And Kathy Jennings knows of at least a dozen manuals on building a deck and where to find the best recipes for apple pie.

Both are ready and willing to share their expertise with the people of Shawnee County — for free.

They are librarians at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library.
Eighty-one employees at the library make more than $40,000 a year, while 49 make more than $50,000 a year. Twelve, mostly managers and administrators, make more than $70,000. CEO Gina Millsap has the highest salary — at $129,549 this year.

Millsap said those wages reflect the market — a competitive price to hire the best and brightest to staff what she described as “a world-class library.” Millsap’s 2010 salary of $125,776 is less than the average Midwest library director’s salary by $12,000, according to the Allen County Public Library National Survey for 2010.

More from Capital-Journal Online.

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