Censorship

Catcher Gets to Stay on the Shelves

A panel of community members has determined the fate of JD Salinger\'s \"Catcher in the Rye.\" The verdict; it will remain on the Dorcester School District (SC) library\'s shelves. A school board member was campaigning to have the book removed. This is his second attempt, and he didn\'t fair any better the first time around. more... from The Charleston Post & Courier. ...I really must make it a point to read this book just to see what all the fuss is about...

Book decency rules weak, parents say

Washington Times is running This One on the never ending fight in the Fairfax County [VA] schools over appropriate reading material in school libraries.

A committee made up of school system staff came up with some new guidelines, while some members say they are happy with the guidelines, others say this does not address their concerns.
See also

Reading material causes airport security freakout

The Philadelphia City Paper reports that a man was prevented from boarding a plane because he was reading a book.

The book, Hayduke Lives!, has a picture of a bomb on the cover.

\"He told me to step aside,\" Godfrey says. \"Then he took my book and asked me why I was reading it.\" -- Read More

Censorship Through Concentration

Fran writes \"Discussion by Mark Crispin Miller regarding terrorism and civil liberties and the manner in which the media is excluding relevant events from reported occurrences.

Full Story
\"

Interesting look at how the strong media concentration has caused censorship to become largely privatized, that is the owners of the media and major advertisers censoring what we read. I guess this will free up the government to worry about passing more...new...better...faster laws (DMCA).
Oh, wait, no, that was bought and paid for by that same strong media concentration .

See Also.

Colleges provide chilly climate for free speech since attacks

FreedomForum has This One on all the college faculty and staff getting in trouble for expressing opinions on the terrorist attacks.

They call it an erosion of free academic expression that existed before Sept. 11.

\"These are real conflicts,\" he said, between \"what universities feel is civilized behavior and free speech that they feel we must protect. I think we still haven\'t sorted it out yet.\"

Remembering The Book Ban Case of 76

Newsday.com has A Story on the 1976 book-banning that became the basis for a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding students\' rights.

In 1982, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited public school officials\' authority to remove books they find offensive from school libraries.

\"There\'s always going to be censorship,\" said Steven Pico, who as a 17-year-old
junior at Island Trees High School became the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. \"That\'s
why there always needs to be people to resist the pressure.\"

Commemorating the Infamous Island Trees Book Ban of \'76

From Newsday, someone has written an article about the famous book ban of \'76 that resulted in a Supreme Court decision limiting the authority of school officials to ban material on the basis that they find it personally offensive. more...

Censorship in wake of terror attacks

stuart yeates writes \"
The BBC is carrying a story about how ``information about hazardous chemicals\'\' is being pulled from websites in the name of national security. There appears to be very little assessment of whether this censorship could be counterproductive, in that it lowers the threat visability and thus preparedness. It also fails to mention that many of the pages are cached on Google\" and similar engines.
\"

A tale of two Harry Potters in Jacksonville FL

The Associated Press reports that Duval County School District has decided to require a permission slip signed by a parent before any student can check out Harry Potter books. But that\'s not the end of this story... -- Read More

No Plague of Banned Books

entertainmentnewsdaily.com is running a Story that says never have more books by more authors on more subjects been more readily available to more people, and Banned Books Week is ALA hype.


\"In short, the fanatics and book-burners against whom Banned Books Week is meant to keep us vigilant are mostly parents who raise questions about their kids\' reading material. In the world according to the American Library Association, moms and dads are the enemy.\"

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