Academic Libraries

Academic Peer-Review Crowd Sourced

Academic Peer-Review…Crowd Sourced

Sympoze: a network of high-quality academic publications that utilizes crowd sourcing for the peer-review process. Crowd sourcing the peer-review process improves a number of problems with the current academic publishing model.

Reduced referee burden
Reduced review time
Speed up finding qualified referees
Eliminate the bad luck of being assigned to a biased or overworked referee
More diverse feedback
Decisions better reflect opinion of the field
Sympoze will also offer…

High-quality peer-reviewed scholarship by experts in the field
Immediate open-access publication (for pieces that pass the review process)
Yearly print volumes for each discipline in traditional book and e-book formats

New Services Are Diluting And Hurting Academic Librarianship

Bike Sharing Comes to the Academic Library

"The problem with offering great coffee, comfy chairs, and bicycle rentals to the library is not that these amenities are unwelcome — indeed, they are appreciated by most patrons. The problem is that they start diluting the brand of the academic library. And a dilution of the academic library brand may make it more difficult to justify hiring, retaining, and compensating highly trained academic staff."

You want to go to the library at 3am Britains the place

You want to go to the library at 3am? Britain's the place

A quarter of UK universities offer round-the-clock opening for flexible study. Matthew Reisz reports. An international survey of universities has revealed a striking difference between the library services offered by British institutions and those in the rest of the world. Although it remains unusual, a far greater proportion of British universities now keep their libraries open 24 hours a day than their counterparts elsewhere, the poll suggests.
[Thanks Ender!]

Zombie Guide to Miller Library

Follow the link to enjoy our finished Zombie Guide to Miller Library! There is also a link on the main menu of the library website. Let us know what you think on our facebook page.

The print version will be available this fall, so get ready for that, as well.

Finishing Strong: Manage The Ending

Finishing Strong: Manage The Ending
When you design your next instruction session or presentation, or in giving thought to how you end reference transactions or consultations, consider giving as much if not more thought to your finish as you do to your beginning. They say you only get one chance to make a first impression. But your first impression will likely be less well remembered than the one with which you choose to end. So design and manage that last impression well.

Calibrating Students BS Meters

Calibrating Students' B.S. Meters
Showing students how to read critically and formulate research queries is part of the teaching function of college libraries. But how do you teach students to read critically that which has no text?

That is the challenge Frances May, an adjunct librarian at the University of North Texas, took on when she decided to adapt her library’s orientation program to meet what she sees as a growing demand for “visual literacy” among today’s college students.

Who Will Referee the Referee The ACS As Publisher and Approver

Who Will Referee the Referee? — The ACS As Publisher and “Approver”
"How big a deal is this? The conflict of interest is blatant in the case of Chemical Abstracts and Journal of Chemical Education, and it is somewhat subtler in regard to the “Highly Recommended” journal list, 63% of which is comprised of ACS titles. But in both cases the conflict is real, and seems to have gone largely (though not entirely) without public comment up until now. It may be that ACS is handling these conflicts honorably, but how can we know for certain? At the very least, this issue seems to bear more and wider discussion."

Library Brings Civil War Day-By-Day

What was happening in the South 150 years ago on any given date during the Civil War?

A website posting just that has made its debut.

The Civil War Day by Day, drawing on the vast holdings of the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will present samples of the Civil War’s documentary remains every day for the next four years.

The chronicle begins at the war’s outbreak, the first military engagement at Fort Sumter, S.C., on April 12, 1861. It will continue through April 9, 2015, 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender.

The four years of war will be recounted through pamphlets, books, photographs, sheet music, letters, diaries, telegrams, order books, and much more, as these items are found in the Library’s stacks and reading rooms. Readers will be invited to walk with those who lived the war, and are encouraged to share their own reflections about these documents and their significance a century and a half after the war

See the posts at http://www.lib.unc.edu/blogs/civilwar/

Scoring The Taiga Forum Provocative Statements

Check out http://www.agiat-forum.org/

You may already be familiar with The Taiga Forum, it's a community of AULs and ADs challenging the traditional boundaries in libraries. The Taiga Forum meets annually.

So, Taiga Forum Provocative Statements. When they come out, there’s a crowd that shrieks in frustration at them, every single time. Well, now it’s been 5 years since their first batch… How’d they do? The Agiat Forum is going to score them. If they’re both right and wrong in the same statement, they get 0 points. If they knocked it out of the park, they get one point. If they’re so wrong it’s baffling, they get -1.

Total Taiga Score from 2006, out of a possible 15: -1
They fail: Wrong more often than right. So. There’s one woman’s fast pass at this. What do YOU think? How did Taiga do 5 years ago? Do you hate them less? More? Are you ambivalent? Why?

With Latest Donation, N.Y.U. Food Library Joins Big Leagues

With Latest Donation, N.Y.U. Food Library Joins Big Leagues
Anna Bennett, a senior at New York University, was puzzled about where to find research material for a nine-page paper. “The topic was ‘Write whatever you want about a food group, recipe or ethnic food,’ ” she said. “The first thing that came to mind was Ethiopian food.”

She went online and started an instant-message chat with a librarian deep inside the university’s fortresslike Bobst Library, across West Fourth Street from Washington Square Park: Do you have any cookbooks?

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