Academic Libraries

So Many Great Movie Scenes in Libraries

The Guardian has put together a composite of library scenes from a variety of movies here, including The Breakfast Club, Ghostbusters, The Squid and The Whale.

There are many reasons we need to save our libraries, not least because of their cinematic history. From thrillers to epic romances to teen comedies, the library is cinema's go-to location when it wants somewhere with history, gravitas and a glass door that can shatter when you scream. They're sacred places, spooky places – they're downright sexy places. Characters can find the meaning of life and death in them, clues to help solve cases in them, or just have a big old sing song in them. With such a rich history, one does wonder what would happen if writers and directors no longer felt the need to use them in films. What would they use instead? The internet can never compete visually – who wants to see their leading man/lady finding out facts on Wikipedia? Discovering the murderer on an app? Searching the shelves of … Amazon? It just won't do.

So sign every petition you can, borrow as many books as possible, keep libraries alive and open, on our high streets and in our cinemas. In other words, don't ssssh.

A Stealth Librarian Manifesto (from Confessions of a Science Librarian)

"Stealth librarianship is a way of being...the principles of stealth librarianship apply to all branches of the profession, each in particular ways...the core is the same: to thrive and survive in a challenging environment, we must subtly and not-so-subtly insinuate ourselves into the lives of our patrons. We must concentrate on becoming part of their world, part of their landscape..." *

A timely and very thought-provoking list from John Dupuis via Confessions of a Science Librarian.

*Included with permission from the author.

Building a Large-Scale Print-Journal Repository

From the Chronicle of Higher Education:
Academic libraries in the western part of the United States are one step closer to having a large-scale regional trust for print-journal archives. The University of California libraries announced last week that it has received a three-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to implement plans for the Western Regional Storage Trust, or West. The grant is about $700,000, according to Brian E.C. Schottlaender, the university librarian at UC-San Diego and a key member of the planning team....Read more here

IT's Role in the Library of the Future

Podcast from the Chronicle's Tech Therapy series featuring Sue Stroyan, information-services librarian for Illinois Wesleyan University speaking about the trend to merge IT and Library services at academic institutions.

Listen here

Does Harvard Tell Yale? Last of the Ivies to Join Borrow Direct

From Yale: If the roughly 12.5 million volumes in Yale's libraries weren't enough for Yale students, they will now have access to 17 million more thanks to the Harvard Library. The decision comes nearly 10 years after the rest of the Ivy League began participating in the interlibrary sharing system Borrow Direct.

Harvard is the last Ivy League college to take part in the program, which allows students and staff to request volumes from other schools' libraries. There are more than 45 million volumes currently in the system.

Some, like professor of German art and culture Jeffrey F. Hamburger '79 GRD '87, who chaired a Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences library advisory committee, told the Crimson that the university had concerns its library would be a net lender rather than a borrower.

"That said, there are areas in which other libraries have stronger collections than we do, and I think time will tell whether it’s the right decision," he added.

I want to be an academic librarian

Amusing video about an imaginary interview http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=it4WZ68MlkU

From a recent articlea in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

New Librarian for Yale Beinecke Library

The new year is bringing a new librarian to the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library according to the Yale Daily News.

Edwin C. Schroeder will serve a five-year term as Librarian of the Beinecke and Associate University Librarian, which began Jan. 1. Schroeder has filled a number of positions of increasing responsibility in Sterling Memorial Library and Beinecke library since arriving at Yale in 1989. He began as a catalogue librarian in Sterling, and most recently has been head of technical services for Beinecke library since 2004.

University President Richard Levin notified the Yale community of the appointment a Dec. 20 email, just five weeks after the death of University Librarian and former head of Beinecke library Frank Turner GRD '71.

“E.C. looks forward to building on Frank Turner’s accomplishments,” Levin said in the e-mail. “We look forward to sustaining the unique excellence of the Beinecke.”

Levin added that Schroeder, who was the chair of the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries, brings an “impressive breadth of rare book and managerial experience” to his new post.

Books aren't dead at university libraries

Books aren't dead at university libraries
To understand why so much money is being poured into the modern university library (the U.'s library costs more than $18 million a year to run), you have to expand your concept of a library beyond print.

This isn't to say the modern university library doesn't have books. They do. But the way students use a library goes beyond books to include e-books, research databases, classes, studying and socializing.

Death by Irony: How Librarians Killed the Academic Library

Death by Irony: How Librarians Killed the Academic Library

The academic library has died. Despite early diagnosis, audacious denial in the face of its increasingly severe symptoms led to its deterioration and demise. The academic library died alone, largely neglected and forgotten by a world that once revered it as the heart of the university. On its deathbed, it could be heard mumbling curses against Google and something about a bygone library guru named Ranganathan.

Law Librarian at Several Ivies, Morris L. Cohen Dies

From the New York Times: Morris L. Cohen, a book lover who shunned the practice of law because it was too contentious and became one of the nation’s most influential legal librarians, bringing both the Harvard and Yale law libraries into the digital age, died Dec. 18 at his home in New Haven. He was 83.

Morris L. Cohen, at the University of Pennsylvania's law library in 1971, went on to be law library director at Harvard and Yale. The cause was leukemia, his wife, Gloria, said.

Mr. Cohen had worked at his Uncle Max’s law firm and on his own in Brooklyn in the 1950s before deciding that enough was enough. “He wasn’t cut out for practicing law,” Mrs. Cohen said. “He was not confrontational.”

Instead, he would become director of the law libraries at four universities: the former University of Buffalo, the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard and Yale. He brought to those positions a fascination with legal history — as evidenced in the six-volume Bibliography of Early American Law (1998), which he researched and compiled for 35 years — and with modernizing law libraries. He also brought that fascination to his classes in legal research.

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