Academic Libraries

Appeal seeks to keep classical music treasures in the UK

Charles Davis Sent in this Story from
Ananova on an appeal launched to buy a unique collection of classical music treasures.

The Royal Philharmonic Society archive could be split up or
leave the UK unless the cash appeal succeeds, the British
Library said today.


Deborah Bloom also sent in A Second Story on the same thing.

Romans Clash Over Musical Treasures

Charles Davis passed along
This One
on the president of one of Romes most venerable musical institutions, who has sparked a row with
another organisation over the custody of valuable music artefacts.
He had joked that in their new home, musical treasures would be preserved and available for
research, unlike the original manuscript of Bellinis Norma, which he said is currently being gnawed
by mice under the very noses of the librarians.

But a journalist took the comment seriously and the librarian of the Conservatorio was asked to
respond.

Campaigners urge action to preserve digital heritage

Charles Davis writes \"from
Ananova Story
With More at the \"The Guardian\" where they say

Academics are warning that more needs to be done to
preserve Britain\'s digital heritage.

The Digital Preservation Coalition fears over-reliance on
technology means important contemporary records could
be lost to future generations.

\"

Spies, Lies and the Distortion of History

Luis Acosta writes \"The Washington Post, in a story about a KGB archivist who meticulously collected and smuggled out information concerning the KGB\'s activities in Afganistan after the 1979 Soviet invasion, calls the archivist\'s work \"one of the most impressive acts of heroism ever performed by a librarian.\" More generally, the story highlights the difficulty of reconstructing history when events are manipulated by layers of misinformation by competing intelligence agencies.
See Steve Coll, \"Spies, Lies and the Distortion of History,\" Washington Post, February 24, 2002, page B1, or On The Web \"

Art In Libraries

Charles Davis passed along this Ananova Story on Ten Leonardo da Vinci drawings from the Royal Library at Windsor Castle that are going on show to mark the Queen\'s Golden Jubilee.


In other art/library news, A boy of 10 discovered a long-lost Victorian painting worth up to £600,000 hanging above a bookcase in his school library.

The work, The Fate Of Persephone, was by leading British painter Walter Crane and had last been heard of in Germany in 1923 and is estimated at between £400,000 and £600,000.It will be put up for auction at Christie\'s in London on June 12th, just in case you have a few hundred thousand pounds in your fines jar you don\'t know what to do with.
That\'s about 856,850 US Dollars now.

Texas Archives Release Chummy Bush / Lay Correspondence

The Texas state archives have released documents suggesting that Bush\'s ties to Enron\'s Kenneth Lay are much closer than he\'d have us believe. He appears to be trying hard to bury any additional evidence. Thanks to Metafilter.

SAA 2001 Diversity Roundtables Report Available

The report on the Society of American Archivists\' diversity roundtables at the 2001 convention are available (as a PDF.)

Battling Over Records of Bush\'s Governorship

From the New York Times (registration required):

The stacks of the Texas State Library and Archives groan with boxes of carefully preserved papers dating back to James Pinckney Henderson, the first governor, who served from 1846 to 1847. But anyone trawling for insights into the most recent former governor, George W. Bush, or say, his ties to Enron in the years he ran Texas, would have to travel 118 miles east to College Station. Even then, it might be months, maybe even years, before many of the records are available. The papers . . . are at the center of a tug of war between Mr. Bush and the director of the Texas state archives. By placing them at his father\'s presidential library at Texas A&M University, Mr. Bush is putting them in the hands of a federal institution that is not ordinarily bound by the state\'s tough Public Information Act . . .

\"Who needs a shredder when you have Daddy\'s presidential library?\" said James Newcomb, an official with the Better Government Association in Chicago, which relies heavily on freedom-of-information requests . . .

More.

A new chapter for libraries

SFGate is running A Detailed Story on the New Breed of Academic libraries.

They say librarians are urgently looking for ways to keep students coming through their doors. They also talk about
the cost of online information, which they point out is significantly more than their printed counterparts. An example is the Oxford English Dictionary, which cost about $1,000 for the 20-volume set and had two editions in the 20th century. The online version costs about $10,000 a year -- but it is searchable and includes words as they stream into the language.

\"I think everybody on campus is worried about the new generation -- that they won\'t get what they think are the most important things in their field. And in the library field, (that) is the habit of acquiring information that has a good chance of being reliable,\" said Thomas Leonard, university librarian at the University of California at Berkeley. \"If we can\'t pass on that habit, then the library fails, even if it looks like a great temple.\"

Archivists Demand NYC Reclaim Giuliani Papers

From the New York Times (registration required):

A group of archivists and historians yesterday angrily denounced the transfer of Rudolph W. Giuliani\'s mayoral papers out of city custody and said that they intended to hold Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg responsible for retrieving the documents, which are being stored at a warehouse in Queens.

The group also held out the possibility of a lawsuit or other legal action should Mr. Bloomberg and his corporation counsel, Michael A. Cardozo, fail to address their concerns . . .

More.

Syndicate content