Academic Libraries

UGA Mentor Program

This was posted to the newlib-l discussion list today and seems a very interesting idea that other institutions may want to look into:
\"The UGA Libraries’ Committee on Research and Professional Development is proud to announce the launch of The Mentor Program. Mentoring at the UGA Libraries encompasses counseling and guidance, collaboration,
research assistance, professional development needs and much more.
Feel free to look around and let us know what you think. We hope to have a well established and successful program in the near future.\"

Here\'s the link to the University of Georgia Libraries Mentor Program.

Lessons in Librarianship

LLRX writes \"Jan Bissett and Margi Heinen reflect on teaching librarians legal research, offering us insights into how they have selected and prepared teaching materials, the sources they have used, and the lessons they have learned. Published in the January 15, 2002 issue of LLRX.com

\"

Scholarly Work in the Humanities & the Evolving Info Environment

A December 2001 publication of the Council on Library and Information Resources:

As the scholarly information environment changes, so do the needs, expectations, and behaviors of users. Assessing and responding to those changes is essential for the academic library so that it may continue in support of the scholarly mission. The authors of this report have formally examined how humanities scholars conduct and collate their research. The study was based on a small sample of scholars; nonetheless, the results are powerfully suggestive of ways in which academic libraries can adapt to and develop in a rapidly changing environment. In particular, the findings emphasize how important it is for libraries to chart their evolutionary course in close consultation with scholarly user communities.

This study results from the fruitful cross-fertilization between the scholar concerned with aspects of information science and the librarian concerned with delivering operational information services.

More, with thanks to wood s lot.

Collection Management Initiative

Laura Fosbender writes \"From October 2001 through September 2002, about 300 print journals, for which electronic access and publisher data are available, have been temporarily removed from the shelves of the nine campuses of the UC system.

During the course of the experiment, faculty and students will rely on the digital versions of these titles to meet their information needs. -- Read More

20 Million Accessed 1901 UK Census in First Week

Or tried to, anyhow - a flood of genealogists has swamped the servers of the UK\'s Public Records Office, which unveiled the online version of the census this week:

The growing fascination with family history came to the fore this week when an estimated 20m people attempted to access the newly launched online version of the 1901 census.

Designed to cope with just 1.2m visitors a day, the site effectively seized up with a couple of hours and within 24 hours had been withdrawn for a quick overhaul that the Public Records Office said would allow more people to log on.

Plans to put all Victorian census records online are also to be speeded up to meet the obvious demand from a public fascinated with when their relatives were born, married and died and how they lived their lives . . .

More from the Guardian.

1901 UK Census Available Online, Heavily Used

An editorial from the London Evening Standard:

The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. Or so LP Hartley told us in the opening sentence of his novel The Go-Between, published in 1953. But we\'re now keener than mustard to catch hold of all our yesterdays.

Two days ago, the Kewbased Public Record Office was stunned by the overwhelmingly avid response to its decision to put the 1901 census on line (the most recent census released under the 100-year rule that protects individuals\' privacy). I\'m surprised at its surprise. The Public Record Office should have known that, these days, everyone wants to be a DIY historian . . .

More. The 1901 census data can be examined here, although as Ananova recently reported, heavy demand is making it difficult to use the site.

Review of Legal Portals

LLRX writes \"Weighing the
Benefits of Legal Portals

Cindy Curling reviews the major and minor legal portals, detailing the strengths and weaknesses in their respective services and content.
\"

Blessed be the ties that bind...

Lee Hadden writes: \"The Georgia State University library is undergoing repairs for
brickwork that was done only fifteen years ago. The repair work will cost
the state about 7 million dollars, compared to the $10 million it took to
build the library in the first place. Metal ties, used to keep brickwork
attached to the frame of the building, were unaccountably left out during
construction. Without them, some bricks and other debris have fallen from
the building. Blessed be the ties that bind...

The latest repair estimate for the 15-year-old building, which cost $10
million to build, is $7 million. Of that, $5.8 million has been set aside,
while the regents, GSU and the Georgia State Financing and Investment
Commission continue to try to find the rest.
Full Story

Historical \"ephemeral films\" archive - free .avi downloads.

Archive.org/movies
This site is just plain cool, it\'s a quirky historical archive of 
short, old movies and films (ads, educational, propaganda films, and others)
available in two different formats: .mpg (mpeg-2) and DivX
.avi\'s (mpeg-4).

From Archive.org\'s description:
\"This collection contains movies that the Prelinger
Archives
has digitized (about 956 now online) and donated to the Internet
Archive. The films focus mainly on everyday life, culture, industry, and
institutions in North America in the 20th century.\"

Browse through the looong title
list
or read \"About
This Collection
\". I especially enjoyed the article
by Bart Eisenberg where
the archivist, Rick Prelinger, \"calls himself a \"media archaeologist.\"

LISNews searches: movie
-|- film
-|- Archive.org.

-Hermit ;-)

Library of Congress adds \'Jaws,\' \'Apes\' & \'Animal House\' to Film Registry

Librarian of Congress James Billington has selected 25 films to be added to the National Film Registry. \"Each year Billington chooses 25 that are culturally, historically or aesthetically significant for inclusion in the Registry. For each title named to the Registry, the Library of Congress works to ensure that the film is preserved for all time.\" According to Billington, \"Our film heritage is America\'s living past. It celebrates the creativity and inventiveness of diverse communities and our nation as a whole. By preserving American films, we safeguard our history and build toward the future.\" Click below for the list of this year\'s movie titles. -- Read More

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