Academic Libraries

The battle of the book: the research library today

The New Criterion has an Interesting Story on the \"war\" between Books and Computers
The author, Eric Ormsby, says that each format has come to stand for something in the minds of its adherents: if not a style, then a stance.
The full story isn\'t online.

\"The zealous computer fanatic sees the book lover as troglodytic; the staunch book lover regards the computer fanatic as barbaric. As you might suspect, both sides are right and both sides are wrong.\"

Hanging Out at the Bodleian

In a National Post article, Julia McKinnell, a summer student at Oxford, describes the joys of being in the Bodleian Library.

She reports having to \"swear before a man in a gown that I wouldn\'t \"kindle fire therein\" or \"undertake to injure objects.\" After taking this solemn oath, she requests a few books for the fun of it.
You can read the whole article here. -- Read More

Online Academic Libraries Colloquy Tomorrow

\"Are College Libraries Too Empty?\"

The Chronicle of Higher Education will be holding an online colloquy on this subject tomorrow (Thursday, November 15) at 2 p.m. U.S. Eastern time. The guests will be Council on Library and Information Resources president Deanna B. Marcum and Association of College and Research Libraries president Mary Reichel.

Click here to submit a question to be answered during the online session.

Library Kids Art Display is Wall-to-Wall

In an effort to promote art and libraries, the Natrona County Public Library in Casper, WY, in partnership with schools recently placed some 12,000 works of art, created by kids, on display in the library. The article includes tips for others who may be interested in such a project. More from Today\'s Librarian.

Special Librarian Job Board

Adam Wright has set up a Special Librarian Job Board, a free resource for libraries and librarians.
If you\'re a special library in need of a librarian, or a special librarian in need of a library, check it out.So far, not many jobs, but keep in mind it\'s just getting started.

U of T\'s porn test

Bob Cox sent along This Story from The Toronto Star on the largest collections of modern pornography in Canada now being cataloged at the University of Toronto, \"behind a door marked Do Not Enter — Alarmed Directly To The Toronto Police Service\".

Its acquisition makes U of T the first Canadian institution to own such materials, though the academic study of smut is well advanced in many places of higher learning in the United States.

\"Some of it is from Italy and goes back to the earliest days of filmmaking — there\'s one that I\'m guessing is from 1910 or 1915 because it\'s very jerky,\" says the professor. \"Oh, I guess I shouldn\'t use that word.\"

Caffeinating Library Gate Count

Hermit;-) adds some more on the empty library problem\"The Chronicle has an article lamenting student\'s decreasing attendance at libraries and voicing the familiar debate \"about what the rise of databases and the decline of reading rooms means for academics.\"
It mentions some of the things directors are doing to draw patrons back into the brick and mortar including using \"sofas-and-lattes\". The colloquy section asks the question \"Should college libraries try to attract more students by opening coffee bars and cafes?\"
Thursday, Nov. 15, 2 p.m. U.S. Eastern time is a \"live, online discussion\": \"Are College Libraries Too Empty?\" w/ the presidents of the ACRL & CLIR\"

The Deserted Library

Martin Raish writes \"As academic libraries spend more money on electronic resources, and less on \"traditional\" materials, our students are spending less time in the reading room and more in the computer labs. \"The shift leaves many librarians and scholars wondering and worrying about the future of what has traditionally been the social and intellectual heart of campus, as well as about whether students are learning differently now -- or learning at all,\" says Scott Carlson.

Chronicle of Higher Education, 16 November \"

SAA Responds to Presidential Paper Restrictions

An excerpt from SAA President Steve Hensen\'s letter to Congress:

I write to express the grave concern of the Society of American Archivists with respect to the President’s recent Executive Order 13233 on Presidential Papers . . .

Our apprehension over this Executive Order is on several levels. First, it violates both the spirit and letter of existing U.S. law on access to presidential papers . . . This law establishes the principle that presidential records are the property of the United States government and that the management and custody of, as well as access to, such records should be governed by the Archivist of the United States and established archival principles—all within the statutory framework of the act itself. The Executive Order puts the responsibility for these decisions with the President, and indeed with any sitting President into the future. Access to the vital historical records of this nation should not be governed by executive decree; this is why the existing law was created . . .

Second, on a broader level this Executive Order potentially threatens to undermine one of the very foundations of our nation. Free and open access to information is the cornerstone to modern democratic societies around the world . . .

More. Thanks to librarian.net.

Smithsonian Museum and E-Bay Acquire Florida\'s Voting Machines

One of the voting machines used in the Florida year-2000 Presidential election is being immortalized in the Smithsonian Institute\'s Museum of American History. The remaining 3,499 machines are being auctioned off on E-Bay. \"The county is asking a minimum bid of $300 for a voting machine with brass plaque, a butterfly ballot, a certificate of authenticity, 25 sample punch-card ballots and a signed photo of the canvassing board. For a $600 minimum bid, they\'ll throw in all that, plus an aluminum ballot box.\"
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