Academic Libraries

Smithsonian Museum and E-Bay Acquire Florida\'s Voting Machines

One of the voting machines used in the Florida year-2000 Presidential election is being immortalized in the Smithsonian Institute\'s Museum of American History. The remaining 3,499 machines are being auctioned off on E-Bay. \"The county is asking a minimum bid of $300 for a voting machine with brass plaque, a butterfly ballot, a certificate of authenticity, 25 sample punch-card ballots and a signed photo of the canvassing board. For a $600 minimum bid, they\'ll throw in all that, plus an aluminum ballot box.\"
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Bush Clamping Down On Presidential Papers

From yesterday\'s Washington Post:

The Bush White House has drafted an executive order that would usher in a new era of secrecy for presidential records and allow an incumbent president to withhold a former president\'s papers even if the former president wanted to make them public.

The five-page draft would also require members of the public seeking particular documents to show \"at least a \'demonstrated, specific need\' \" for them before they would be considered for release . . .

\"The executive branch is moving heavily into the nether world of dirty tricks, very likely including directed assassinations overseas and other violations of American norms and the U.N. charter,\" said Vanderbilt University historian Hugh Graham. \"There is going to be so much to hide.\"

More.

Safeguarding European Photographic Images for Access

Mark writes \"SEPIA (Safeguarding European Photographic Images for Access) is a EU-funded project focusing on preservation of photographic materials. On this website (http://www.knaw.nl/ecpa/sepia/) you will find information about :

research: \'scanning equipment and handling procedures\', \'preservation aspects of digitisation\', \'ethics of digitisation\' and \'descriptive models for photographic materials\'

news and events: containing announcements and press releases about the latest SEPIA news, a calendar of events and references to relevant resources
training: about SEPIA workshops, seminar and national SEPIA training events
orginal proposals for SEPIA I and SEPIA II
SEPIA partners and associate partners: cooperating SEPIA institutions
This website is also a platform and a source of information for anyone who wants to know more about the preservation of photographic materials.
\"

Milestones of Academic Librarianship

The ALA (Actually The ACRL) has put together Over 100 years of progress, a list of milestones of academic librarianship.

They run from 1876
• American Library Association founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Among its founders were three major figures in American librarianship: Justin Winsor, William Frederick Poole, and Melvil Dewey.

Up to 1998
• Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 and Copyright Term Extension Act.

They seem to have missed, Nov 2 1999, LISNews is launched

Re-inventing the wheel

I\'ve been meaning to post this story for a while as it annoyed me so much when I first read it, I even contemplated writing a letter to the editor. In this recent story, The Stanford Daily describes Bookshare, an initiative set up by students last year. The students relate how they came up with the idea;
\"[we] were sitting in our room, staring at our full bookshelves and feeling depressed over the amount of money we had spent on textbooks for one quarter\"
So, they came up with a radical solution: create an alternative to buying books at the campus bookstore by setting up an online database of books available for students to loan out to one another for a fixed period of time.
Apparently other University campuses are interested in the system, which is described as being \"based on Napster\". The system is being expanded to Movieshare, Gameshare and CDshare. Sound familiar? Can anyone say \"library\"? Argh! Anyone else feeling this frustration? Don\'t they realise what libraries are there for?

Glasgow University fire destroys Darwin manuscript

Charles Davis writes \"A fire at Glasgow University has destroyed first edition
works of Charles Darwin.
The fire caused £8m of damage, and university officials
describe the losses of original manuscripts as \'tragic\'.
It\'s thought the fire started in roof space used for storage in the 100-year-old Bower building.
Professor John Coggins has told The Daily Telegraph
about the lost documents.
\"Some of these would have included works by Darwin but
what is more irreplaceable is the loss of original
manuscripts, \" he said.
More at
The Telegraph


\"Although we may have duplicates of these in the university\'s library, it is tragic that we have lost the originals.\"

Can LOC Preserve its 35 terabytes?

Luis Acosta writes \"Short article in MIT\'s Technology Review on the Library of Congress\'s effort to figure out how to preserve digital information:\"


Congress recently gave the library $100 million to figure out what to do with all that stuff.

\"With that money we\'ll be able to gather the technical people and the archivists and start to develop a prototype,\"

USC Library Reopens After \"Seismic Retrofitting\"

The University of Southern California\'s Edward L. Doheny Memorial Library has been outfitted to withstand earthquakes:

The 650,000-volume library, a focus of research in the humanities and social sciences, has been a striking example of Italian Romanesque architecture on the campus since it opened in 1932 . . .

The library was damaged like so many other Los Angeles buildings in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. USC used funds granted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cover most of the costs of building 17 shear walls to strengthen the structure against lateral movement from earthquakes.

More from the Los Angeles Times.

Ethiopian University Plans to Expand Library Facilities

The Institute of Ethiopian Studies at Addis Ababa University has begun a fundraising campaign to finance the construction of a badly needed new library:

The Institute of Ethiopian Studies on Monday September 24, 2001 held a pre-launch of a fund raising campaign to build a new library that is estimated to cost USD 5 million. The open house held by the IES on Monday attracted over 250 guests, who were entertained by Ethiopian singers, musicians, and dancers . . .

President of Addis Ababa University, Prof. Eshetu Woncheko, emphasized the importance of the IES, which has the largest collection of Ethiopian artefacts in the world, and the need to provide a new library. The library is currently in Ras Makonnen Hall, a palace donated by Emperor Haile Selassie to the university. The hall was not designed to display or hold the weight of the growing IES collection of manuscripts, books and periodicals.

More from allAfrica.com. More details on AAU library collections can be found at the IES library homepage.

Letter by Letter

The Great Bob Cox sent along This One from U Of Chicago Mag on the University Library\'s Special Collections.

They have a $125,000 grant from the Save America\'s Treasures Program, and librarians have begun going through the collection piece by piece, putting it into order and preparing it for microfilming. By next June they plan to have the entire collection on film. The oldest paper-like documents in Regenstein are fragments of flattened papyrus from the second century a.d.

No word on plans to put the collection online.

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