Academic Libraries

Is U.S. History Becoming History?

The workings of government in the first decades of the information era have been poorly recorded, archiving experts say. Years of valuable public records may have already been lost, creating a gap in the country\'s historical record.

Archivists, government watchdog groups and investigative reporters worry that unless the problem is solved, the lack of information could make it more difficult to hold government officials accountable for their decisions and policies. [more...] from Wired News.

Libraries and the Assault on Paper

Two stories on \"Doublefold: Libraries and the Assault
on Paper\", a book that has some harsh words for some
library practices. The NY Times Story includes words from
James Billington, the librarian of Congress.


The
SunTimes
also has a Book Review and further
comments on the book.

Care of AV Materials For Broadcasting

Here\'s An Article I found on a part of librarianship
I\'m not sure I even knew exsisted.

They say content preservation is the main problem in
the management of audio-visual archives, and present
various options for taking care of your archives. Lots of
nice fancy charts and graphs in this one.

Medici Family Library and Archives

Lee Hadden Writes:
\"Today on Morning Edition from National Public Radio was an account of
the Medici Family Library and Archives, and their work to catalog this
unique and enormous collection of Italian history.\"

The archive is a collection of virtually
every letter sent or received by the Medici court and covers alot of Italian art and European history. They Hope to have the project complete by 2012, it takes up over a Kilometer of shelf space!

The
Medici Archive Project has a website: medici.org

Diverse Collections

Private Passions, Public Legacy is the first full-scale display of a collection of 447 rare books, manuscripts, and maps from the estate of Paul Mellon.


The Tiny Rosenbach Museum at 2010 Delancey Place in Philadelphia, that sounds like a neat place. They\'ve staging exhibitions of some relevance to its collections


Studying Malcolm X A Columbia Universtiy project delves into black leader\'s life and papers.

\'\'Very few historical figures are more powerful in death than in life, but Malcolm is one of them,\'\' Marable said, sitting in his book-lined office. \'\'How do you explain it? How does a man go from Public Enemy No. 1 to white America - to having his image engraved on a US postage stamp?\'\'

Priceless historical documents being left to rot

Charles Davis writes \"Tens of thousands of priceless historical documents are being left to rot,
fade and disintegrate in the attics of the French National Archives, according
to furious scholars who have described one of France\'s most famous
institutions as being in \"an appalling mess\".
Full Story at
The Telegraph \"

Library urged to save \'raw history\' of world

Ever-helpfull Charles Davis sent in this one From UK Daily Telegraph on a growing campaign to stop the British Library from throwing out thousands of historic
overseas newspapers was launched yesterday.
There is a legal obligation to keep a
copy of every British newspaper and the library is committed to keeping
Commonwealth papers, not so for foreign papers though.
I can\'t seem to find a link for this movement, anyone else know anything?

\"Michael Crump, director of reader services at the library, said such appeals
were \"sentimental\". \"The reality is that we have limited resources and limited
space. There are 32km [20 miles] of newspapers in the library and this is
growing by a third of a kilometre [364 yards] a year.\"

First airing since 17th century for music discovery

Charles Davis writes \"From
Ananova.com
a Story on a rare piece of music that popped up in The Bodleian Library. It\'ll now be performed for the first time since 1637!How\'s that for an encore?\"

A Day on the Job: Archivist

Someone writes \"Here\'s an interesting little story from CNN on an archivist in Alaska.\"

It\'s good to see some of the over looked parts of the LIS world get some attention. The story is on Kathleen Hertel, processing archivist in the Archives and Manuscripts Department of the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA).

Literary gems languish in library

Bob Cox sent along This Story on the Wilmington Institute Free Library\'s basement.
They have issues of Time dating from 1924 and Scientific American from 1846 and a full 20-volume original set of The North American Indian. They just don\'t have the money to properly maintain the archives.

\"Attics and basements are the worst places to keep your materials,\" Dimunation said. \"When you have extended spikes in either temperature or humidity, it subjects the paper and bindings to expansion and contraction. Those are the extremes we try to avoid when we store books in a rare book vault.\"

Syndicate content