Academic Libraries

New SACS Accreditation Criteria

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) has released a proposed new set of standards for accreditation for colleges in their region. The proposed standards are alarmingly weak concerning libraries, where the previous standards were quite good and expected a high level of professionalism in library services. Academic librarians in the region are up in arms, trying to get the proposed standards changed. They may turn out to be successful, and they may not. It is a scary reminder that the place of librarianship and libraries is anything but secure, regardless of how you conceive of libraries and library service. The latest Library Juice has an article from TEXLINE, a newsletter of the Texas Library Association, on the issue, with links to relevant SACS documents, followed by some discussion from COLLIB-L, the listserv of the ACRL college libraries section, which give some insight into what is happening and what can be done about it.

National Archives Week

I don\'t know how I missed it, but this is National Archives Week!

Archives Week is an annual, weeklong observance of the importance of archival and historical records to our lives.

Just so you don\'t miss it in the coming years:


ARCHIVES WEEK DATES, 2000-2003

October 8-15, 2000
October 7-14, 2001
October 6-13, 2002
October 5-12, 2003


Give your favorite archivist a Big Kiss!


National Archives and Records Administration

Challenges face Library of Congress

Philly.com has
a short but sweet interview with curator Harry Katz at LOC on the troubles with preservation these days.

\"As society becomes more digitalized, the library is increasingly looking at computer capacity as much as warehouse space in planning its future needs. \"One problem is the hardware,\" Katz said. \"Technology moves so fast that in a few years today\'s computers may be obsolete. No use keeping the disks if they can\'t be read. How much equipment do we have to preserve, too?\"\"


Interesting point I never considered, now they must save computers in order to read the disks in the future.

The Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

The
Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

is a look back at how things were a couple hundred years ago
at The Smithsonian. It\'s full of cool old photos and info
for all you history buffs.

Rare Free Offerings from the Behemoth(s)

Free content from legal publishing giants Lexis and Westlaw? It can\'t be
true... ahhh, grasshopper, but it can. Will it last, is the
real question. -- Read More

In-tents Librarians

R Hadden Writes:
The Wall Street Journal has an item on today\'s front
page (Tuesday,
August 29, 2000) in the \"Work Week\" column, about a
library.
\"Inspiration hit Charles \"Duke\" Oakley one day as he
cruised past a
Cirque du Soleil big top. Mr. Oakley, then facilities
director for the
University of California at Los Angeles, decided a tent
would make a fine
temporary library. So the school built a
36,000-square-foot vinyl fabric
affair, complete with aluminum skeleton, lights and fire
sprinklers....
UCLA\'s Mr. Oakley, now in private practice, ...misses
the temporary
library since it was taken down. \"It was a little festive,
and it was a
little unusual,\" he says.\"`

There is no indication of when this event
happened, nor any comments
from the library staff about library concerns such as
insect control or
humidity levels or potential for vandalism. -- Read More

Radical Archives

The Boston Herald has an interesting Archives Story. It seems that Brandeis and Clark universities are afraid of the writings and memorabilia of Abbie Hoffman. Instead they will be kept at the University of Connecticut, which has no connection to the late Chicago Sevenster.

``Good Lord, why didn\'t they give it to Brandeis?\'\' asked Boston University professor Joseph Boskin, who lectures on the counterculture and regards Hoffman as a hero. ``They (probably) didn\'t want to be associated with Abbie Hoffman. Maybe his ethics offended them. What other reason might there be?\'\' -- Read More

Law library for laymen

Here\'s a nifty story on the opening of York County (VA) law library. The library consists of a few computers and some printed materials. The library\'s computerized databases include Virginia Law on Disc; and Federal Law Solution, which has U.S. Code and information on U.S. Supreme Court and Fourth District Court cases. Print materials in the library\'s archives include the Code of Virginia; York County Code; and Michie\'s Jurisprudence, an encyclopedia of legal information for Virginia and West Virginia.

\"The software, in addition to Internet access, should be enough to get people started and answer a lot of questions, County Attorney James Barnett said.\" -- Read More

Law Librarians Sad on Salaries

Law.com has A Story from the ALA Meeting on Law Librarian Salaries. As you may have guessed, it is not a glowing report on the state of librarian pay. It\'s not just the pay in law offices, but many firms simply don\'t think the libraries are important.

\"\"We need to get away from the attitude that we are lucky to make what we make,\" says Elizabeth Kenney, the law librarian at the Boston office of Philadelphia-based Dechert -- Read More

Archiving Today\'s Digital Culture

Foxnews is carrying a Story on The 10,000-year Library Conference, hosted by The Long Now Foundation and Stanford University Libraries. They discussed how today\'s archival institutions will cope with preserving multimedia content such as digital audio and video files, photography, databases, Web pages and even links to related content. They say that most libraries are making a new \"digital library\" online, to preserve the information. This of course raises many new issues... -- Read More

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