Email

What does your email address say about you?

What does your email address say about you?
Key Takeaways:
•Here’s our stereotype: older people (as defined by a propensity to still be using AOL, Yahoo or ISP email) are the “truth through proof” heard; they’re listening and ready to learn about your service, but they’re not ready to jump right in (whether that means purchasing quickly or telling their friends). However, once you’ve sold them, they are often the most loyal users in your database, so don’t discount them!
•We wish more people would sign up for Savored with work email addresses – it’s abundantly clear to us that people welcome the delicious distraction of dining reservations while punching the clock.
•Quite a few people still have/use Juno email accounts. Wow.

A Library Without Librarians Is Just A Bookstore

University of Western Ontario (UWO) librarians are still on strike.

Suggested RDA Improvements

Mac Elrod of Special Libraries Cataloguing responds to Tuesday's announcement that implementation of RDA, the successor to AACR2r, has been recommended to be delayed until 2013.

In Paris, A Display From Hockney's Pixelated Period

David Hockney thinks his current exhibition may be the first one that's ever been 100 percent e-mailed to a gallery. The 73-year-old artist is standing in the space in question — the Pierre Berge-Yves St. Laurent Foundation in Paris — trying to talk about the works, when his iPhone rings.

More from NPR's Morning Edition.

Facebook's 'Not Email': Simpler, Stickier & Bound for Success

This morning, Facebook announced its new messaging system. CEO Mark Zuckerberg made it clear that the system was "not email" and not intended as the media-hyped "Gmail killer". Zuckerberg did say, however, that "this simpler type of messaging is going to be how people shift their communication."

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Internet Can Be a Dangerous Place for Unsupervised Children

Internet predators are using more sophisticated means to lure children into dangerous situations says The News Chief of Winter Haven, FL.

In July, the Federal Trade Commission released a report concerning child safety on the Internet. The report stated that in 2004, 45 percent of American children had a personal cellular phone, while in 2009, the number of children with a phone grew to 75 percent.

Cellular phones have become more sophisticated, allowing the user to access the Internet, chat, text, e-mail, photograph and play games - all on one device. The report raises concerns about the amount of personal information teens and older children inadvertently may share by making online purchases and browsing the Web. In response, the FTC has concentrated its efforts in combating Internet predators by expanding its Internet lab and developing tools to assist in mobile-related investigations.

This is something Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd has been focusing on for much of his career. "There is no fail-safe protection from these predators," said Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Donna Wood. "This is a new frontier for crime.

Why Email No Longer Rules…

The WSJ says Email has had a good run as king of communications. But its reign is over.

In its place, a new generation of services is starting to take hold—services like Twitter and Facebook and countless others vying for a piece of the new world. And just as email did more than a decade ago, this shift promises to profoundly rewrite the way we communicate—in ways we can only begin to imagine.

Scholarly E-Mail Lists, Once Vibrant, Fight for Relevance

Once they were hosts to lively discussions about academic style and substance, but the time of scholarly e-mail lists has passed, meaningful posts slowing to a trickle as professors migrate to blogs, wikis, Twitter, and social networks like Facebook.

"While I am still on a few listservs, it is mainly because they give me no other option for receiving information," wrote Kay Cunningham, an electronic-resources librarian at the University of Memphis. "I find them increasingly annoying —even those with digest options, and for the most part I delete them unread."

Spam overwhelms e-mail messages

More than 97% of all e-mails sent over the net are unwanted, according to a Microsoft security report.

The e-mails are dominated by spam adverts for drugs, and general product pitches and often have malicious attachments.

The report found that the global ratio of infected machines was 8.6 for every 1,000 uninfected machines.

Apple Sued Over Touch-Screen Rights

Taiwanese firm Elan Microelectronics has sued Apple Computer alleging infringement of two of its touch-screen patents, a company spokesman said Wednesday.

The suit was filed late Tuesday afternoon in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, said spokesman Dennis Liu, speaking by phone from the chip design firm’s headquarters in Hsinchu, Taiwan.

“We couldn't find a common viewpoint with Apple, so we decided we had to take action,” he said, adding that the companies had been in licensing talks for about two years.

The lawsuit alleges that Apple products including its MacBook computer, iPhone and iPod Touch use technology that infringes on two of Elan’s “multi-touch” patents, the company said in a statement.

Wonder what this will mean for all those Apple products already in use.

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