Wireless

Revolution in Wireless Chip Size Announced By University of Michigan Engineering

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "

University of Michigan researchers have figured out how to build wireless systems even smaller while still retaining range and power efficiency.
  One obstacle to further shrink small wireless devices has been trying to fit all the components onto one chip but U-M researchers have built a tiny silicon-compatible antenna and frequency resonator that will do just that.
  The antenna and resonator are two of the most problematic off-chip components in wireless systems. The two components require large amounts of space off the chip---think of a cell phone antenna extending outward---thus limiting how small a device can be built.
  We could have cell phones almost the size of an earpiece," Flynn said. "You could have sensor nodes that are almost invisible, you could just sprinkle them around."
  Rather than using a traditional wire antenna, researchers built a slot antenna. In a slot antenna, instead of the metal wire, imagine covering an entire plane with metal, leaving only a slot or groove in the metal bare. Wire surrounds the groove so it's much more effective at radiating electromagnetic waves in a small antenna, Sarabandi said. Because of the antenna's shape, the wireless system does not need a network to match the antenna's frequency to the rest of the electronic device.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/04072 2085808.htm_____________________________http://www.eecs.umich.edu/RADLAB/bio/sarabandi.dir /saraband_hp.html________________________________"

Revolution in Wireless Chip Size Announced By University of Michigan Engineering

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "

University of Michigan researchers have figured out how to build wireless systems even smaller while still retaining range and power efficiency.
  One obstacle to further shrink small wireless devices has been trying to fit all the components onto one chip but U-M researchers have built a tiny silicon-compatible antenna and frequency resonator that will do just that.
  The antenna and resonator are two of the most problematic off-chip components in wireless systems. The two components require large amounts of space off the chip---think of a cell phone antenna extending outward---thus limiting how small a device can be built.
  We could have cell phones almost the size of an earpiece," Flynn said. "You could have sensor nodes that are almost invisible, you could just sprinkle them around."
  Rather than using a traditional wire antenna, researchers built a slot antenna. In a slot antenna, instead of the metal wire, imagine covering an entire plane with metal, leaving only a slot or groove in the metal bare. Wire surrounds the groove so it's much more effective at radiating electromagnetic waves in a small antenna, Sarabandi said. Because of the antenna's shape, the wireless system does not need a network to match the antenna's frequency to the rest of the electronic device.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/04072 2085808.htm_____________________________http://www.eecs.umich.edu/RADLAB/bio/sarabandi.dir /saraband_hp.html________________________________"

Holy City - becoming first Wireless City & Other Global Milestones

Note from Bill Drew: Is this a holy alliance or an unholy alliance?
http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "_______________________________________http://www.globes.co.il/serveen/globes/docview.asp ?did=816178&fid=942

WiFi project to link Jerusalem
  Service will be free during the first year, courtesy of Intel, Compumat and the Municipality of Jerusalem.
  A joint initiative by the Municipality of Jerusalem, Intel (Nasdaq:INTC),and Compumat Computers Ltd., together with the Jerusalem Business Development Authority, may turn the Holy City into the world's first wireless fidelity (WiFi) city within two years. Users in most areas of the city will be able to surf the Internet wirelessly.
  The project, based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)'s WiFi standard, will enable data transfer at a distance of 300-500 meters, at up to 54 megabit per second (Mbps).
http://www.emediawire.com/releases/2004/7/emw14209 2.htm________________________________NYC, CA. and Nigeria experiences WIFI PLUShttp://www.emediawire.com/releases/2004/7/emw14209 2.htmhttp://www.digitalmediadesigner.com/articles/viewa rticle.jsp?id=26491"

SD WIFI Card & Flash Memory in One - Being Introduced

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "..http://www.bargainpda.com/default.asp?newsID=2122

This July SanDisk Corporation brings to the market the first ever SD Wi-Fi card that combines 256MB of flash memory storage in the same card.  SanDisk gave us the chance to play with this new SD card before it hits the market sometime at the beginning of next month.  Using my iPaq 2215, which comes with integrated Bluetooth but no integrated Wi-Fi, I put this card to the test.
http://davesipaq.com/articles/000060/"

500 Mbps, 802.11n Wi-Fi Specification - w/ Backwards Compatibility

http:://search-engines-web.com/ writes "http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/040712/nym104_1.html

802.11n proposal incorporates MIMO technology to offer best combination of high data rates, spectral efficiency and backward compatibility for wireless consumer and enterprise applications
___________________________________http://www.convergedigest.com/WiFi/wlanarticle.asp ?ID=11687
Agere Proposes 500 Mbps, 802.11n Wi-Fi SpecificationAgere Systems announced a 802.11n proposal that would push raw Wi-Fi link rates to 500 Mbps while retaining backwards compatibility with existing Wi-Fi specifications. Agere said its proposal, to be submitted to the IEEE this summer, incorporates continued innovations in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques, as well as wide bandwidth channels, 5 GHz transmissions and numerous operating modes to ensure robust data throughput, increased network capacity and legacy protocol compatibility. MIMO increases data throughput on a single channel by creating more "air paths" for the data to be transmitted. Using multiple transmit and receive antennas, each path can carry a different set of data at the same frequency.
  Higher data rates are also achieved using 40/20 megahertz (MHz) channel widths. Agere's proposal supports both 20 and 40 MHz channel widths, allowing for worldwide operation and increased data capacity. The 40 MHz channels, consisting of two adjacent 20 MHz channels, will more than double the current 54 Mbps data rates to approximately 125 Mbps per transmission. In 2002, Agere demonstrated a 3x3 (three transmitter/three receiver) MIMO system supporting 162 Mbps wireless networking speeds.
  Finalization of the 802.11n specification is expected to be completed by the IEEE in 2006.
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New Revolutions in Wireless Technology Released

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "http://www.japancorp.net/Article.Asp?Art_ID=7758

NTT DoCoMo Introduces Embedded Wireless Packet Module ...has brought to market the DoPa Ubiquitous Module, a new embedded wireless packet communications module.
  The module measures 37.0x35.7x5.0mm, weighs 10g, and supports data communications at 9.6Kbps. Integrating a cellphone's wireless unit and data adapter, the module can be embedded into various devices on assembly lines.
  The company will promote applications including automotive navigation systems and vending machine inventory control systems. Also, when embedded into power and gas meters, the module will enable remote metering and the informing of current leakage.
___________________________________http://www.computerweekly.com/articles/article.asp ?liArticleID=131819&liArticleTypeID=1&liCategoryID =1&liChannelID=2&liFlavourID=1&sSearch=&nPage= 1
Fujitsu has developed a prototype wireless Internet Protocol (IP) telephone handset that can also be used with conventional cellular telephone networks.
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Stunning Achievements - Wireless & Routers Advancements

Anonymous Patron writes "http://news.zdnet.co.uk/hardware/storage/0,3902036 6,39157660,00.htm________________________________________

Maxtor and Linksys will collaborate to develop a hard drive with no physical link to a PC
  If hard-drive maker Maxtor and networking company Linksys have their way, your external hard drive is about to become very external.
  On Tuesday, the companies plan to announce a partnership featuring a $99 (£55) Linksys device designed to allow an external hard drive to connect to a wireless router, letting PCs tap into the storage and share files without any physical link to the drive.
  The joint effort is geared toward small offices and homes, markets overflowing with companies pitching home-networking technology. Maxtor and Linksys -- a Cisco Systems unit -- are marketing products together and tout a common set of instructions for tying drives to routers with what's dubbed the "Linksys Network Storage Link."
 
more info:http://www.linksys.com/press/press.asp?prid=159&cy ear=2004other wireless intoductions:http://www.linksys.com/press/press.asp?prid=161&cy ear=2004__________________________________________http://news.zdnet.co.uk/communications/networks/0, 39020345,39159399,00.htm
The networking giant has secured an entry for the highest capacity Internet router ever developed
  What does networking giant Cisco Systems have in common with Radhakant Bajpai of India, whose longest ear hair measures 5.19 inches at its longest point? They're both world record holders.
  On Thursday, Cisco announced that Guinness World Records, an authority for record-breaking achievement around the world, has certified the Cisco Carrier Routing System (CRS-1) as the highest capacity Internet router ever developed. The new router will be the first networking technology to be recognised by Guinness World Records.
  The CRS-1, announced in May, is designed to shuttle traffic across the backbone of the Internet. The company spent four years and $500m (£275m) developing the technology, and even created a new software operating system for the product. Cisco claims that the router can reach a routing throughput of 92 terabits, or 92 trillion bits per second. With this kind of capacity, the entire printed collection of the US Library of Congress could be downloaded in 4.6 seconds. The same feat using a dial-up modem would take around 82 years.
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JiWire to Go

This service from JiWire works very well. Find Hotspots without being connected to the internet. I just installed it on my laptop. It does require you to register for free.

http://www.jiwire.com/hotspot-locator-laptop.htm?cid=580001

"JiWire's Portable Hotspot Locator provides mobile professionals with an easy-to-use software application to find Wi-Fi access points (i.e. 'hotspots') around the world. Laptop-toting business travelers can search for hotspots by Country, State, City, Zip Code, Location Type (Cafes, Hotels, Airports...), or by specific Wireless Internet Service Provider. Once a desired location is found, users who have a live Internet connection can get maps and driving directions from JiWire's website."

Microsoft Patents Human Data Transmission/ Network

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes: "http://www.economist.com/science/displayStory.cfm? story_id=2876950

US Patent 6,754,472, issued to the company on June 22nd, is for a “method and apparatus for transmitting power and data using the human body�.

__________________________________________http://www.vnunet.com/news/1156286

Microsoft patents human body networkHuman networking conduit 'not a totally batty idea', says professorDinah Greek, vnunet.com 29 Jun 2004ADVERTISEMENTMicrosoft has been awarded a patent for a technology that could one day harness the natural electrical conductivity of the human body and skin to form a networking conduit.
  The patent for "a method and apparatus for transmitting power and data using the human body" was filed in 2000 and awarded last week.
  Microsoft proposes in the application that it would be possible for a variety of devices, such as a keyboard or separate speakers for a watch, PDA and radio, to be connected by electrodes to a power source carried on the body.
  Data and audio signals could be transmitted over the same power signal, and Microsoft suggested that the increasing number of portable devices people wear or carry with them make the idea plausible.
  The technology could significantly reduce the need for multiple power sources such as batteries, and reduce the need for output devices such as speakers to a single source.
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Des Moines-Area Library Goes Wireless

Jenne writes "The Urbandale Public Library has gone wireless! Patrons can bring in their laptop computers with wireless network cards and connect to the Internet. Up to 10 people can connect at the same time and the signal can be received throughout most of the library."

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