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Why Amazon's Plagiarism Problem Is More Than A Public Relations Issue

Why Amazon’s Plagiarism Problem Is More Than A Public Relations Issue
Plagiarized editions for sale in Amazon’s Kindle store show how the company is still adapting to the world of original content creation. At the same time, the stolen books may also present a test of the retailer’s ability to rely on a widely used legal shield that protects content sites from being accused of copyright infringement.

Nancy Pearl's Publishing Deal With Amazon

Nancy Pearl and Amazon.com have struck a deal to republish some lesser recognized titles that are favorites of the Book Lust author and librarian hero.

However, not everyone is thrilled with the idea. As reported in The Seattle Times:

...Overnight, this 67-year-old Seattle grandmother has become a greedy betrayer of the small, sometimes-struggling, bookshops that so supported her. "Yes," says J.B. Dickey, owner of the Seattle Mystery Bookshop about such an assessment. "By aligning herself with Amazon, she's turning her back on independents. Amazon is absolutely antithetical to independent bookselling, and, to many of us, truth, justice and the American way."

If things sound like they've gotten a little heated over Pearl's latest project, they have.

On Wednesday, Amazon.com announced it was issuing "Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries series, a line of Pearl's favorite, presently out-of-print books to share with readers hungry for her expert recommendations."

About six books a year would be published in versions that include print books and eBooks, says the Seattle-headquartered merchandising Goliath that in 2010 had sales of $34 billion, or about $1,077 per second.

Harvard Bookstore Presents Anti-Amazon Video "Don't Be an iPhoney"

Also listen to an accompanying story via WBUR Boston Public Radio about the backlash over Amazon's Price Check offer.

Amazon Publishing mines yet another untapped resource

Amazon Children’s Book Deal a Low-Cost Route to Growth
While Amazon has made the bulk of its headlines at the end of 2011 thanks to its Kindle Fire tablet, a quieter story about Jeff Bezos’ great machine has been unfolding — one that has seen the company returning to its roots in books. Amazon Publishing, the company’s very own book imprint, has been growing at an exponential rate over the past 12 months. The latest territory taken by Amazon Publishing: children’s books.

Amazon’s Jungle Logic

From an op-ed in the NYT

Excerpt: Scott Turow supplied lawyerly perspective: “The law has long been clear that stores do not invite the public in for all purposes. A retailer is not expected to serve as a warming station for the homeless or a site for band practice. So it’s worth wondering whether it’s lawful for Amazon to encourage people to enter a store for the purpose of gathering pricing information for Amazon and buying from the Internet giant, rather than the retailer. Lawful or not, it’s an example of Amazon’s bare-knuckles approach.”

School Librarian Concerns About Amazon/Marshall Cavendish Deal

Amazon's decision last week to purchase 450 children's book titles from Marshall Cavendish has left librarians wondering how the ecommerce giant will handle the books' distribution channels, and whether they'll still be available from independent bookstores and major library suppliers such as Follett, Mackin and Baker & Taylor.

Full article in School Library Journal

Competing with Amazon is not an easy thing to do

Amazon has three pretty powerful things going for them, and two are entirely their own doing.

Number one: Amazon is, by far, the most book-industry-focused company that is actually active in endeavors much larger than the book business.

Number two: Amazon executes.

Number three: Amazon is the runaway market leader in the only two segments of the book business that are growing — ebooks and the online purchasing of print — and they are cleverly leveraging the leadership position they have to make challenging them even more difficult in the future.

Details on the three points

It's Not About Libraries, It's About Amazon

It's Not About Libraries, It's About Amazon

The Penguin move should be seen not as corporate verdict on libraries, but as a reaction to Amazon's entry into the library market. When Overdrive was distributing content to libraries on their own platform, the publishers were able to view Overdrive, and libraries in general, as a counterweight to Amazon. But the extension of Overdrive lending to the Kindle flipped libraries into the Amazon column. That's the best way to understand the Penguin decision, though you won't see them saying that.

Marketplace Fairness Act Gets Amazon, ABA Backing

The goal of leveling the playing field between brick-and-mortar retailers and online retailers came a step closer Wednesday with the introduction of the Marketplace Fairness Act by a bipartisan group of ten senators led by Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.). If enacted, states would be able to collect the sales taxes they are owed under current law from out-of-state businesses, rather than rely on consumers to pay those taxes to the states.

“Amazon strongly supports enactment of the Enzi-Durbin-Alexander bill and will work with Congress, retailers, and the states to get this bi-partisan legislation passed,” added Paul Misener, Amazon v-p of global public policy. “It’s a win-win resolution.” Amazon has staunchly oppossed state-by-state tax initiatives, but said it would back a national policy.

Full article

Amazon Announces the Kindle Owners Lending Library

And so, it begins.

Today, Amazon announced the Kindle Owners Lending Library.

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