Art Libraries

Baltimore Will Celebrate Native Son Zappa This Fall

A weekend-long celebration featuring live music, a symposium and art exhibit will celebrate the dedication of the Frank Zappa statue in Baltimore, organizers said. A bust of Zappa, a Baltimore native, was a gift from a Lithuanian fan club. After much deliberation, the city decided to place it in Highlandtown, outside the library. His wife said Zappa would have liked the location, because his mother, Rose Marie, was a librarian.

Zappa Plays Zappa, a tribute act fronted by Zappa's son Dweezil, will perform; Zappa's widow, Gail, will give a symposium; and the Southeast Anchor Library will launch an exhibit in conjunction with the Sept. 19 statue dedication, according to producer Sean Brescia.

"It's going to make it what it should be," Brescia said. "It's going to be a cool tribute weekend." Baltimore Sun.

New Walnut Creek (CA) Library Houses Art & Books


"Shhh...A Portrait in 12 Volumes of Gray," by Christian Moeller, is the centerpiece of the public art on display in Walnut Creek's new public library, which opens on July 17.

At one entrance, shown above, visitors to the library will be greeted by internationally recognized artist Christian Moeller's 26-foot-tall portrait of a cheeky librarian holding a finger to her lips. At another, they'll walk under a stream of colorful glass bottles riding a metal tidal wave. And in the children's area they won't be able to help but notice the playful sculptures of bees, dragonflies and flowers flitting across the walls. Twelve photo images and more on the new library from Contra Costa Times.

New Jersey Library Loans a Little-Seen Painting to the Metropolitan Museum

From Arts Journal: A few days ago, the Dover Free Public Library in Morris County NJ, took 'Emigrant Train Attacked by Indians' by Emanuel Leutze (painter of the more famous Washington Crossing the Delaware) down from its walls, packed it, and put it in a truck destined for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will be on loan there for five years. After that, no one is talking.

Why? Dover library director Robert Tambini told the Morris Country Daily Record that he was bothered that such an important painting, which hung in the library's reading room, was unrecognized, unseen by enough people. It was lent to the library in 1934, and given to it in 1943 by a local family, the Derrys, in memory of Olivia Smith Derry.

Recently appraised for insurance, it was valued at $2.5 million, up from $300,000 in 1988, according to the DR. Here's a link to the article in the Daily Record.

Bookplate Exhibit, University of Virginia

James M. Goode has assembled one of the finest private collections of American and English bookplates I have ever seen. If you click on the this link you will see a most informative video about his collection.

If you can get to the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia before July 31st, be sure to visit Three Centuries of the American Bookplate a representative exhibit of the Goode collection . It will be on view at both the Alderman and Harrison -Small Libraries. For summer hours check the following website:
Http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/hours Information about the exhibit is detailed in the bookplate blog posting dated 6/12/2010:

Http://bookplatejunkie.blogspot.com

Artist Chosen for Philip Larkin Statue

BBC reports: Sculptor Martin Jennings has been chosen to produce a bronze statue of the poet Philip Larkin for the Paragon Interchange in Hull.

Jennings was one of three sculptors invited by the Philip Larkin Society to submit designs for the artwork. Larkin, who lived in Hull for 30 years before his death in 1985, combined a celebrated writing career with his role as librarian at Hull University.

Designs by sculptors Graham Ibbeson and Jemma Pearson were also considered.

Jennings' work includes the statue of poet St John Betjeman at St Pancras station in London. He said: "I'm absolutely delighted to have been commissioned to make this sculpture of one of Britain's greatest poets.

Book Art Exhibit at Washington & Lee

"Beyond Text and Image: The Book as Art" opens on Thursday, Feb. 25, in Staniar Gallery, Wilson Hall, at Washington and Lee in Lexington, VA. Curated by W&L humanities librarian Yolanda Merrill, the exhibition showcases 30 works by nationally known book artists.

Merrill will give a curator's talk and slideshow on Wednesday, March 3, at 6 p.m. in the Concert Hall facing the Gallery. The lecture will be followed by a reception in Lykes Atrium, adjacent to the Gallery. The exhibit, curator's talk and reception are free and open to the public.

Merrill herself has many years of experience as a bookbinder and bookmaker, and has co-taught a course in the book arts at Washington and Lee. A selection of the student work made in the course is on display in the Lykes Atrium.

The focus of the exhibit is on sculptural books. However, there will also be photographs and other two-dimensional works in the show. Washington & Lee.

Who Belongs On Our "Blogs To Read In 2010" List?

(Why This List Matters.)

We're in the final stretch of putting together our annual list, "10 Blogs To Read in 2010".

What blogs do you read every day? What blogs help you learn? What blogs keep you informed? What blogs make you laugh? Who's the best writer out there?

Think of it this way: "I read many others, but these are the LIS blogs that read even when time is short"

I'm looking for input from as many people as possible so the final list doesn't miss any new talented bloggers. My goal again this year is simple, we'll list 10 blogs that, when followed as a group, paint a complete picture of what's going on in our little world. You can leave a comment below, hit the contact form, or send an email to btcarver@lisnews.com.

Before you nominate, take a look at past winners, they aren't eligible for 2010:

10 Blogs To Read in 2006
http://www.lisnews.org/node/17775

10 Blogs To Read In 2007
http://www.lisnews.org/node/20341

The LISNews 10 Blogs To Read In 2008
http://lisnews.org/node/28830

10 Blogs To Read In 2009
http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2009

At Nixon Library, Mao Statue Rankles Some

A statue of deceased Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong at the Nixon Presidential Library &Museum is the subject of a protest planned for Thursday, on the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

The statue has been in the Hall of World Leaders since the Nixon Presidential Library opened. Kai Chen – a Chinese-American organizing the protest – is the first person to launch a complaint about it, said Sandy Quinn, assistant director of the Nixon Library &Birthplace Foundation.

"To even mention Mao with democratic leaders such as Churchill and Golda Meir in the same breath is truly an insult to human intelligence and offensive to all the freedom-loving people in the world," said Chen, who emigrated from China in 1981 and lives in Los Angeles.

"Having several figures in the world leaders' (section) doesn't mean we endorse their policies," assistant library director Sandy Quinn said. OC Register.

Another article from the LA Times points out that the library,
once privately run, is making a transition to government operation..."and that has turned statues of Mao Tse-tung and Chou En-lai into political footballs".

Apocalyptic New Yorker Cover

In case you haven't seen it...from the June 8 & 15 issue~

Cover entitled “Future Generations” by Dan Clowes, part of a second generation of American underground comix artists.

Ruth Padel, First Woman Chosen As Oxford Professor of Poetry

First a filly wins the Preakness, and now, a 301-year male only streak is broken with the appointment of Ruth Padel as the new Oxford professor of poetry, the first woman to hold the post since it was established in 1708. Ms. Padel, the great-great-granddaughter of Charles Darwin, was chosen on Saturday following a controversial contest for the position.

The controversy surrounding the contest was the withdrawal of another candidate, Derek Walcott, after news surfaced about sexual harassment claims made against him by a Harvard student in 1982. A dossier containing the details had been sent anonymously to 200 Oxford academics. Mr. Walcott’s withdrawal left Ms. Padel and the Indian poet and critic Arvind Mehrotra in consideration.

Story from The New York Times.

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