People N Patrons

I Spy: Library Edition

Yesterday was incredibly busy. There was a children's program in the morning and it was raining book returns from the sky. The door count just eked over the 1500 threshold.

But it was a good Saturday because certain managers were not working which can just make your day.

With the masses of people coming through the doors, it was a great opportunity to people watch, if you weren't too busy trying to explain to patrons why they have late fees. I had one lady get so upset over a .75 (7-5 CENTS, 3 quarters) late fee, that she didn't want to borrow the items she brought to the Circ desk and stormed out of the library.

I spotted this one patron and he really stood out, I asked one of my coworkers, "Hey, did you see that guy in the zebra print button up?" I mean, how could you miss something like that? She said she didn't and asked where he went, I pointed her in the direction of the study desks in the corner of the library.
On her way back to the Circ desk, she stopped by the Info desk to ask another coworker if she saw him as well, to which our Info coworker said, "No but did you see the homeless guy with a tampon stuck up his nose?"

It was at this point that I could only concede that that trumped my find and I lost this round of 'I Spy' but I'll be back (shakes fist towards the Info desk).

Borrow Books, and a Kindle To Read Them On @ Your library

The Shaler Library is letting Phil Breidenbach, 54, of Glenshaw PA and a handful of other patrons experiment with an Amazon Kindle, a hand-held device for reading online books. Shaler will be the first local library to lend such gadgets to the general public when it introduces them during National Library Week in mid-April.

"If books move to a format that doesn't take up space, that will free up libraries to do other things," said Marilyn Jenkins, executive director of the Allegheny County Library Association, a group of suburban libraries, including Shaler. Story from Pittsburgh Live.

The Subconscious Shelf (Or, What Your Books Say About You)

The New Yorker débuts a new photo feature on it's blog today... you submit a photograph of your bookshelf, and we (The New Yorker) tell you what it says about you.

Less than 50 minutes and no charge, if you're picked.

Separated by Distance, But Reading Together with Readeo

Shelf Awareness children's editor Jennifer M. Brown is working with Readeo's CEO and founder Coby Neuenschwander to launch the new service, which promotes shared reading over the Internet.

Readeo (try it for free) allows two people who are separated geographically (such as a grandparent and grandchild or a military parent and his or her child) to share books together in real time while connected in a BookChat (in which they can see each other via a video connection). On the screen, they see the same digitized picture book and turn the pages together.

Readeo is launching with well-known titles from four publishing partners: Blue Apple Books, Candlewick Press, Chronicle Books, and Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing. In her role as editor on the site, Brown works with Readeo's publishing partners to select the titles she believes best enhance the read-aloud experience.

Social Workers @ Your Library

Important story from the Associated Press about the San Francisco Public Library hiring a social worker to help homeless library patrons.

Every day, when the main library opens, John Banks is waiting to get inside. He finds a spot and stays until closing time. Then his wheelchair takes him back to the bus terminal where he spends his nights.

Like many homeless public library patrons, all Banks wants is a clean, safe place to sit in peace. He does not want to talk to anyone. He does not want anyone to talk to him. The day he decides he wants help, he knows what to do: ask for the library's social worker.

The main branch of the San Francisco Public Library, where hundreds of homeless people spend every day, is the first in the country to keep a full-time social worker on hand, according to the American Library Association.

Cities across the country are trying different approaches to deal with patrons who use bathroom sinks as showers or toilet stalls as drug dens. In Philadelphia and San Francisco, libraries have hired homeless patrons to work as bathroom attendants who guide others to drop-in centers or churches where they can bathe.

A Literary Approach to Speed Dating

Reading a good book is like falling in love - it’s exciting and keeps you on your toes. A real page-turner will have the reader staying up late nights and hardly able to concentrate on anything else for long.

But even an excellent book is no substitute for real love.

The Franklin Community Library in Elk Grove, CA hosted a speed-dating event for book lovers on Feb. 16 so that readers could share the titles that make their hearts throb.

Guests were instructed to bring their favorite, or least favorite book, to discuss during each five-minute date. Elk Grove Citizen.

If you were looking for love...what book would you bring?

Library User Privacy in the Age of Social Networking Fanaticism

There are some librarians who want to empower library users by giving them the freedom to expose all of their library borrowing records to the world. Or they want readers to share their book selections and DVD rentals with complete strangers. And I have very mixed feelings about this.

I love getting comments on my blog. And I think library patrons would enjoy being able to link their borrowing records to some social networking widget that lists all (or some) of their books on our library site or embedded within the online catalog or launched out into cyberspace and posted on Twitter or Facebook or LibraryThing or wherever and to comment on what everyone else reads or watches. So on this, I agree with the empowering librarians; I think it would be a fun thing to do.

I would love for my patrons to share their thoughts and ideas with others who may despise them and use those thoughts and ideas as weapons to wage personal attacks, and possibly combine those attacks with the minimal research needed to attack my patrons at their homes or at their places of business. Because I love freedom.

As you can see, I have no faith in mankind to behave with civility. So my role as a protector of borrower privacy is pretty much set in this framework: "I will protect your privacy because you don't understand the dangers associated with losing it." -- Read More

This Book is Overdue! Contest-Contest-Contest!

Whoopee! Three contests in one...enter to win a free mousepad (and who knows what other fame and fortune).

Three ways to win: Here is a contest for This Book Is Overdue! 1) on the Facebook fan page, and another one on the 2) blog page of the This Book Is Overdue website...pick your contest location and ENTER TO WIN!!!!!!!!

The author, Marilyn Johnson, will personally mail a mousepad stamped with the zooming librarian to the person who posts the sweetest true story of a librarian helping a patron in these digitally challenging times.

And to make it a triple threat, we'll add the ability for entrants to enter the contest RIGHT HERE by posting their story about helping a patron as a 3) COMMENT BELOW THIS STORY. Contest is open through March 15.

Man to Serve 140 Days in Jail for Beating Houston Librarian

He must serve 140 days in county jail for brutally beating a librarian in December. Here's the story about the assault incident.

The sentence against the man was finalized Wednesday after he reached a plea deal with prosecutors for his misdemeanor assault causing bodily injury charge. The 57 days he already has spent in jail will be credited toward his sentencing.

He pummeled a librarian at the Houston Public Library's Robinson-Westchase Branch after she warned him twice about his disruptive behavior. Houston Fox reported on the sentencing.

Getting the Stats on Connecticut's Libraries

Stamford Times: The libraries are always keeping records. They know how many books go out, how many are returned and which ones are overdue. They know how many people come to their programs, and they know how many people walk through their doors.

But how many people use the public library on a single day? On Feb. 18, the state's libraries will find out.

Next Thursday, 150 of the state's 285 public and academic libraries will closely monitor their activities for one day. The event is called Snapshot Day.

"It's like a slice of life," said Linda Avellar, spokeswoman for both Stamford's Ferguson Library and for the Connecticut Library Association's publicity committee. "[We want to] get a sense of how heavily our libraries are used."

Snapshot Day -- a joint project of the CLA, the Connecticut State Library, and the Connecticut Library Consortium -- is meant to collect specific data.

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