People N Patrons

Disgruntled library patron ready for court

Disgruntled library patron ready for court
He insists he returned several books in April 2010 by their due date. The Cudahy Family Library says he didn't. At the moment, Herle is on the hook for a $114 fine, plus $152 in restitution to the library.

"I am not responsible for their errors. Nor will I ever, for any reason, compensate them for their incompetence," he said in one of several lengthy emails he sent to me. He's invoking the Constitution and a couple of its amendments, not to mention probable cause, due process, equal protection, you name it.

Collecting Late Fees Too Much of An Aggravation in Boston

From the Boston Globe:

On a Saturday morning at the Gleason Public Library in Carlisle last month, Jason Walsh deposited a tall stack of materials on the returns desk and automatically reached for his wallet. It was the end of school vacation, and he was sure that at least a few of the books, CDs, and DVDs his three young daughters had consumed over the past week had accrued some fines.

But the librarian waved him off, explaining that Gleason had stopped charging for overdue materials five months ago.

Like many library patrons, Walsh was surprised. Aren’t overdue fines as integral to the fabric of the public library system as, say, Dewey decimal numbers or signs asking for quiet?

But Carlisle is not alone in its decision to stop charging for late returns. Over the past few years, Massachusetts libraries have been increasingly hopping aboard the fine-free bandwagon, including institutions in Dover, Littleton, and Westford.

Read more to find out why...

Why Is It So Hard To Donate Books to the New York Public Library?

From the New York Daily News: Interesting article based on the reporter's attempts to give a bagful of books and DVDs on African-American themes to a library on 125th Street in NYC.

Maybe someone wants to comment in response to the article in the NY Daily News?

What Will Happen To Patrons of the Philadelphia Library for the Blind?

From the Philly Post:

It is a plan so dastardly, so despicable, that state and local officials don’t want you to know about it. Pennsylvania has a plan in the works to gut the Philadelphia Library for the Blind, a vital service for the area’s visually impaired. The cover for the move is fiscal conservatism, but that makes no sense as the move may end up costing the state more money. The whole thing has the stench of political cronyism. Governor Tom Corbett and western PA Republicans want to move most of the operations out of Philadelphia to the Carnegie Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in Pittsburgh, nestled in the Governor’s home county. The two libraries share funds allocated in the state library budget. This isn’t about saving money; it is about shifting the majority of those funds to Pittsburgh.

I understand that elections have consequences. I understand party patronage. I don’t understand making the 13,000 visually disabled people who regularly use the Library suffer because of political gamesmanship. The Philadelphia Library for the Blind lent out 600,000 Braille and recorded books last year. That is 20 percent of the entire circulation of the Philadelphia Library System. -- Read More

Oshkosh Public Library gets $1.1 million gift

Oshkosh Public Library gets $1.1 million gift
life-long Oshkosh woman described as an avid reader and movie watcher made a $1.1 million bequest to the Oshkosh Public Library.

The library board decided Thursday to use the money from the estate of Marjorie M. Drexler to establish a memorial trust fund.
Drexler died Aug. 16, 2010, at the age of 87.

[Thanks Mark!]

Toronto library chair defends multilingual collection

Toronto library chair defends multilingual collection
"What proportion of our budget should go for non-English movies and books?" said Del Grande in a widely publicized statement.

"An argument can be made that this is what makes the city great, but I would dare say our common language is English, we’re spending tons of money for ESL, should we not have a discussion of how much of the library budget should go for non-English resources?"

Woman keeps small library alive with book donations

Woman keeps library alive with book donations
EARL PARK, IN (WLFI/CNN) – An Indiana woman's giving spirit and love for literature is helping a small town library flourish, despite a small budget.

Since retiring, Marian Delp has more time to sit down and read a good book. When she's done, instead of putting the books on the shelf, she donates them to the Earl Park Library.

"When I've read it, or listened to it, if it is an audio book, I would prefer to pass it on," Delp said.

Homeless Men Caught Watching Porn at CA Library

Homeless Men Caught Watching Porn at CA Library
Laguna Beach Public Library patrons say there's a big problem with homeless people watching porn on library computers. Police found eight homeless men gathered around a computer inside the library Saturday afternoon watching pornography. One was arrested for allegedly fondling himself.

Getting a Nap @ Chicago's Libraries

Chicago Tribune catches up on new snoozing rules at local libraries:

Fall asleep in the Chicago Public Library, someone will nudge you awake. Do it again, they'll show you the door. But drift off in Lombard's cozy library and you can slumber in peace.

"The library is a good place to at least catch up on the sleep you missed out on the night before," said Tammy Selio as she sat in the west suburban library on a recent Tuesday, a black suitcase filled with her belongings at her side.

Selio, 40, and other homeless patrons often gather there in the hours before a nearby shelter opens at 7 p.m. Sometimes their eyes grow heavy — especially as the days turn gloomy and colder and a comfortable library chair beckons.

Libraries tend to frown on behavior that disrupts other patrons, and that can include sleeping. But Lombard's Helen Plum Memorial Library is considering changing its rules to allow sleeping as long as it doesn't disturb others. Unofficially, it has already done so.

Stolen card brings $322 in late fees

This fine is not so fine
Lorain Public Library patron Caprice Anderson got a big surprise at the main library Wednesday.

It was a bill for $322 in late fees. But she said she hadn’t been to the library in months and she never checked out the items for which her card was used.

“I’m actually a frequent book reader, but I normally buy my books,” said Anderson, 27, of Lorain. “I was going to go to the library and find something I haven’t read. That’s when I found out my card was used.”

Anderson doesn’t know who used her library card, and filed a police report after coming across the staggering late fees.

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