Information Science

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Information Literacy For The Mythical Digital Natives

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 10/05/2011 - 07:27

I wish I could've used this as the title for this post: "Designing information literacy instruction without understanding that feral place where many library users reside is about as effective as taming a wolf. We can do it, but what good does that do for the wolf?"

GREAT post from Joe Grobelny: Feral "Information Literacy"

Violate Terms & Conditions, Get Indicted

Submitted by StephenK on Tue, 07/19/2011 - 16:43
The Bits Blog online with The New York Times reports that programmer Aaron Swartz was indicted for allegedly stealing 4 million documents from MIT and JSTOR. According to documents posted to Scribd, the arrest warrant cites alleged violation of 18 USC 1343, 18 USC 1003(a)(4), 18 USC 1003(a)(2), 18 USC 1003(a)(5)(B), and 18 USC 2. The Boston Globe summed up the charges stating:
Aaron Swartz, 24, was charged with wire fraud, computer fraud, unlawfully obtaining information from a protected computer, and recklessly damaging a protected computer. He faces up to 35 years in prison and a $1 million fine.
Activist group Demand Progress, of which Swartz previously served as Executive Director, has a statement posted. Internet luminary Dave Winer also has a thought posted as to the indictment. Wired's report cites the current Executive Director of Demand Progress as likening the matter to checking too many books out of a library. (h/t Evan Prodromou and Dave Winer) (Update at 1641 Eastern: The Register has reporting here)

Trending Terms, Digital Books & Historical Data Crunching

Submitted by Pete on Wed, 12/22/2010 - 09:20

NPR's OnPoint Radio program today looks at Google and the way of words. They look at what 500 years of word usage tells us about our culture with the Google NGram Viewer. It airs live today, Wednesday December 22nd at 11:00 AM EST with an online stream and will be available later in the day as a podcast.

Information Isn't Knowledge

Submitted by StephenK on Tue, 08/24/2010 - 15:46
Andrew Orlowski at The Register discusses the Wikileaks situation. A key point made is that data alone is useless without contextualization. A key quote from the piece:
The nature of news and journalism hasn't really changed. We want the world explained, the dots joined, and factoids are a poor substitute, no matter how sensational the trappings. We know that information isn't knowledge, and sometimes barely causes a ripple.

Why we probably won't have a Semantic Web.

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 08/17/2010 - 14:31

Why we (probably) won't have a Semantic Web.
Some crazy librarian:

My point is that our understanding of the purpose of the Web is wrong. And our understanding of machines is wrong. Just as our understanding of other people is wrong. We can't possibly know the purpose of the Internet. First, we didn't make it. Second, it was designed with only one purpose, to make access to data easier.

A Revised Taxonomy of Social Networking Data

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 08/10/2010 - 08:21

A Revised Taxonomy of Social Networking Data: Lately Bruce Schneier has been reading about user security and privacy -- control, really -- on social networking sites. The issues are hard and the solutions harder, but he's seeing a lot of confusion in even forming the questions. Social networking sites deal with several different types of user data, and it's essential to separate them.