Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management

Search Questions often Both Wacky and Weird

Submitted by birdie on Mon, 08/03/2009 - 09:27

From MSN: “Search engines have pretty much transformed the way people get information,” says Patricia Wallace, psychologist and senior director of information technology at Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth.

“If you had a crazy question like ‘Why did my toenail fall off?’ 10 years ago, what would you have done? You might have gone to the library or maybe asked your doctor in an embarrassed sort of way, but you probably wouldn’t have asked a friend.”

Seeing the Future in NPR’s Custom News Podcast

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sun, 12/21/2008 - 14:35

National Public Radio has introduced a nifty little feature that lets you create your own custom podcast of NPR content on topics that interest you. Type in Obama or Madonna or whatever, and you can sign up for a stream of NPR clips that match your keywords that can be downloaded to your computer, smartphone, iPod or Zune.

Greenstone 2.81 Released

Submitted by StephenK on Thu, 11/13/2008 - 15:26
David Bainbridge from the Greenstone team posted a release noting that a new version of the package was released. Greenstone originates from New Zealand at the University of Waikato. Relative to the changes in the new release, Bainbridge wrote:
The main focus has been on multilingual support.

Google's growth makes privacy advocates wary

Submitted by reellis67 on Fri, 11/07/2008 - 14:33

Most people today appear to me to love Google, but how much do people really know about this 'indispensable' tool? I'm not going to post an extended rant about how evil Google is in some people's eyes, but I do think that this AP story is worthy of consideration, especially considering the integration that Google is developing with libraries.

Google's growth makes privacy advocates wary

Summary:

This article discusses how information that is collected by Google could be used in violation of current privacy statutes. Some Google tools, such as their Chrome web browser transmit your keystrokes before you press the Enter key. This information is then analyzed by their systems to predict your search terms and offer suggestions. There is an option to turn this feature off, but the activity still occurs, just without user notification, giving the sense that web activity is now 'private'. Along with the information typed into the web browser, your computers Internet address is also recorded, creating a history much like what is visible in your local web browser, but on their servers.

Key concepts from the article:

"It's about having a monopoly over our personal information, which, if it falls into the wrong hands, could be used in a very dangerous way against us,"

“Court says that with all its products, Google has more opportunities than its peers to capture personal information without users realizing it. “

Science 2.0 Gains Another Search Engine: Q-Sensei From Lalisio

Submitted by Jay on Thu, 08/21/2008 - 20:29

Science 2.0 Gains Another Search Engine: Q-Sensei From Lalisio

"While the 2 million-plus article content nowhere near reaches the size and scope of behemoths such as Elsevier’s Scirus or Google Scholar, the Q-Sensei search engine (http://literature.lalisio.com/oai.html) has a metadata orientation that offers some interesting search capabilities."
and "At present, the Lalisio social network of scientists seems to be the most active side of the operation (www.lalisio.com)."

Running Digital Library Software On An Ipod?

Submitted by StephenK on Wed, 07/30/2008 - 20:19

Writing in the Greenstone Blog, Dr. Ian Witten of the University of Waikato brought light upon a paper presented at the recent Joint Conference on Digital Libraries held in Pittsburgh. Dr. Witten noted that New Zealand had more contributions to the conference accepted than South America, Africa, and Australia combined.

If You Have a Problem, Ask Everyone

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 07/23/2008 - 23:41

John Davis, a chemist in Bloomington, Ill., knows about concrete. For example, he knows that if you keep concrete vibrating it won’t set up before you can use it. It will still pour like a liquid.

Now he has applied that knowledge to a seemingly unrelated problem thousands of miles away. He figured out that devices that keep concrete vibrating can be adapted to keep oil in Alaskan storage tanks from freezing. The Oil Spill Recovery Institute of Cordova, Alaska, paid him $20,000 for his idea.

The Web Time Forgot

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 06/16/2008 - 23:54

On a fog-drizzled Monday afternoon, this fading medieval city feels like a forgotten place. Apart from the obligatory Gothic cathedral, there is not much to see here except for a tiny storefront museum called the Mundaneum, tucked down a narrow street in the northeast corner of town. It feels like a fittingly secluded home for the legacy of one of technology’s lost pioneers: Paul Otlet.